Erin McKinstry

Erin McKinstry / KBIA

A couple of decades ago, trash cluttered the banks of the Missouri River.

Tires, alcohol bottles, cigarette butts and plastic interrupted the natural scenery for boaters and proved toxic for wildlife.

But, in recent years, the trash situation has taken a turn for the better. And one mid-Missouri group might have something to do with it.

 


Erin McKinstry / KBIA

It’s a hot day at Cooper’s Landing.

The Missouri River stretches to the right. A bluegrass band and crickets hum in the background. And people are scattered about listening, drinking beer and fanning away the heat. I glance around for Sara Dykman, who’s just arrived from Jefferson City by bike and who’s heading toward Mexico. I don’t see her, but I do see her bicycle.

The bike is bright pink and loaded down with stuff. Suddenly, Sara appears with a Mr. Pibb in hand, catching me in the middle of snapping photos.

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