Gary Grigsby

Reporter

Gary Grigsby began his second stint on the Missouri School of Journalism faculty in February 2004. He was previously on the faculty from 1990-92 when he was the executive news producer for KBIA-FM, MU’s NPR-member station affiliate. Before that, Grigsby was an assistant professor in the Department of Journalism at the University of Mississippi from 1987-1990.

Grigsby started his broadcast career as a reporter at KGAN-TV in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he worked for four years. He also worked as an assignment editor at WEVU-TV in Ft. Myers, Fla.

Grigsby teaches the Broadcast News I course. He is also at KOMU-TV one day a week on assignment with students in the field helping with photography, reporting and production.

Grigsby graduated with a master’s degree in journalism from the Missouri School of Journalism.

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Beth Lago

Getting messy for a cause.  That's what a couple of hundred or so folks did a couple of months back when they got up early on a Saturday morning and cleaned-up a stretch of the Missouri River near Boonville.

It was one of eight major clean-ups of the Missouri River in 2014 coordinated by the Columbia-based organization Missouri River Relief. 

Missouri River Relief

Some of the volunteers who work with a Columbia organization called Missouri River Relief refer to themselves in a manner that some might find interesting.

"We are kind of a tribe, 30-40 of us.  Crew," said Tim Nigh who is one of the founders of the organization. 

Gary Grigsby / KBIA

Electronic waste is a fancy term for everything from computers and monitors to printers and cables.  Well, anything you want to get rid of anyway.


Gary Grigsby / KBIA

For a long time in this country, landowners have taken steps to preserve their land from ever being developed.

Gary Grigsby / KBIA News

You might be surprised to find out that on many a Saturday in Columbia throughout the year, kids are getting up bright and early to take part in science-related activities.

And, it's not even required!  One of these events took place in late April when some Columbia Water and Light employees in conjunction with Columbia Public Schools helped about 15 students construct solar panels. 

With all the bickering taking place in Congress about what to do or what not to do about climate change, you might think federal agencies wouldn't be dealing with it either.

Gary Grigsby / KBIA News

You've probably read the headlines about the drought in California.  It got me to thinking about what many of us probably take for granted, our water supply.

Bert van Dijk / flickr

In Missouri, certain businesses, schools, churches and government agencies are required by law to properly manage electronic waste or e-waste.

Gary Grigsby / KBIA NEWS

Before the early settlers arrived in the Missouri Ozarks fire naturally moved through the area every few years or so creating more open space.

Gary Grigsby / KBIA News

The Washington D.C based Citizens Climate Lobby says if you want to take action on climate change one simple step you can take is to contact your members of Congress and ask them to support the Climate Change Act.

Kenton Lohraff

The Eastern Hellbender is a giant salamander that has been around for millions of years. 

bird
Gary Grigsby / KBIA News

Listening to birds sing and talk is probably something we all take for granted at times.

tree
Gary Grigsby / KBIA News

As you watch a a tree grow you can grow attached to it.

tree
Gary Grigsby / KBIA

 

In much of mid-Missouri during June, July and August, rainfall was well below normal.