Jason McLure

Managing Editor/Host, Global Journalist

Jason McLure is the managing editor and host of Global Journalist. A New Hampshire native, he previously worked as a domestic correspondent for Reuters and as an Africa correspondent for Bloomberg News and Newsweek. His work has also appeared in The Economist, Legal Times, the Center for Public Integrity and the New York Times.

Ways to Connect

Shahzaib Akber / EPA

Every year, a handful of journalists from around the world are selected to be Alfred Friendly Fellows. These journalists are partnered with American news outlets in the hopes that they can learn and help spread U.S. news ideals, namely fair and accurate reporting.

Marco Ugarte / AP

It's a startling number: according to Mexico's National Citizen Femicide Observatory, six women are killed every day in the country. Despite that alarming statistic, only 24 percent of those deaths are investigated, and only 1.6 percent of those cases lead to an arrest and sentencing from 2012 to 2013. On this episode of Global Journalist, we look at what's being called an "epidemic of violence."

Our guests this week:

Matilde Campodonico / AP

This summer, the United States Supreme Court will make a decision on whether to legalize same-sex marriage. But some countries in Latin America have already done that, with Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay being three that have made gay marriage legal. In this edition of Global Journalist, we look at gay rights in the region, and how some countries are actually going backwards in terms of gay rights.

This week's guests:

Argiris Mantikos / Eurokinissi via AP

They come from impoverished and war-torn countries like Sudan or Syria, in hopes of a better life. But for some migrants, their journey ends in death on the Mediterranean. On this edition of Global Journalist, we look at why these people are making the trek in the first place, and if there are any solutions to the growing problem.

This week's guests:

Abir Sultan / EPA

In the wake of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu surprisingly wide election victory, Global Journalist examines whether Israel's politics have fundamentally shifted to the right on everything from security to the possibility of a Palestinian state.

Our guests this week:

A New Cuba?

May 7, 2015
Desmond Boylan / AP

After more than 50 years of hostility and frozen ties with the United States, Cuba is preparing to open up to the world. In this edition of Global Journalist, we look at what it’s like reporting in the Communist country, and what the restoration of diplomatic relations means for Cuba's economy and people.

This week's guests:

Covering Syria

Apr 23, 2015
Ibrahim Khader

  The four-year long civil war in Syria has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives and forced millions to flee. But coverage of the conflict has waned, as other news stories have taken center stage. Global Journalist looks at how journalists are covering the war, and how it's affecting people on the ground.

This week's guests:

Jerome Delay / AP

Ethiopia's parliamentary elections are set to be held May 24th, but there is little doubt the ruling party will win an overwhelming majority amidst a crackdown on independent media and political dissidents. This week on Global Journalist, we look at why and how the restrictions on the media in Africa's second-most populous country began, and speak with a journalist who spent more than a year in prison for reporting.

Jon Chol Jin / AP

North Korea has long been a forbidden land for journalists, human rights advocates, and pretty much anyone who publicly disagrees with the regime’s philosophies and practices. But there have been more and more cracks in the facade, and people are beginning to share their stories with the rest of the world.

Ciro Fusco / EPA

Two years after Pope Francis was selected to lead the Roman Catholic church, Global Journalist's Jason McLure sits down with three Catholic news agency journalists who to examine his popularity and how he interacts with the media.  

This week's guests:

Deported for a Tweet

Mar 27, 2015
AP/Today's Zaman

This week on Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg takes you around the world for a series of stories on the challenges of journalism in a rapidly changing world.

*Mahir Zeynalov, an Azerbaijani columnist for Turkey's Today's Zaman newspaper, speaks with Global Journalist's Jason McLure about being deported from Turkey for his Twitter use.

Yemen on the Brink

Mar 19, 2015
Hani Mohammed / Associated Press

The small Arabian peninsula nation of Yemen has gone through a lot of turmoil in the past decade. One president was ousted in 2012 during the Arab Spring, in January a second was overthrown by the Houthis, an Iranian-backed militia. Meanwhile al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, perhaps the terror group's most deadly affiliate, has seized the opportunity to expand its presence in Yemen.

What is the future of this country, and what does it mean for the West if it becomes an Iranian ally or descends into Somalia-style chaos?

European Pressphoto Agency

After the recent attacks in Copenhagen and France involving terrorists targeting Jewish people, Global Journalist looks at whether this is indicative of a broad rise in anti-Semitism in the region.

We examine recent incidents in France, the Netherlands and Denmark and discuss the threat from Islamic extremists and far-right and far-left political groups.

AP

Our focus this week is on China and the restrictions it places on the media inside the country, and how it affects not only journalists but Internet users. From the Great Firewall to denying visas to critical foreign journalists, what is the future of freedom of expression in the world’s most populous country?

Ukraine Divided

Feb 26, 2015
Petr David Josek / AP

The advance of pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine makes it more apparent than ever that the country is splitting up. With more than 5,000 people dead in the war, is there hope that a ceasefire can end the bloodshed?

Joining us to discuss the battle on the ground and over the airwaves are:

Dolores Ochoa / AP

Many people know Ecuador as the home of calm and picturesque sights, from the Galapagos Islands and lush Amazonian rain forest to soaring Andean peaks.

Courtesy NPR

We talk to Audie Cornish, recipient of a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal, about her work at NPR and the future of radio.

Kin Cheung / AP Photo

The Guardian is a well known and highly respected newspaper that received a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal for services to journalism. We interviewed James Ball, special projects editor at The Guardian, about his newspaper's work and mission. We also spoke to Ball about his connection to Julian Assange and Edward Snowden; he's worked for Wikileaks and with the Guardian team that published the groundbreaking stories about the National Security Agency's mass surveillance program based on leaked documents from Edward Snowden.

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