Kelly Moffitt

Online producer for St. Louis Public Radio's talk shows St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

This Friday, in St. Louis and across the nation, the first nationally-distributed documentary about the protests, activism and aftermath in the wake of the police shooting death of Michael Brown Jr. in Ferguson will be released.

Former Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson recently published the book “Policing Ferguson, Policing America: What Really Happened—and What the Country Can Learn From It.”

Father Augustus Tolton was born into slavery just outside of Hannibal in Ralls County, Missouri in 1854. He would go on to become the first recognized African-American priest to be ordained by the Roman Catholic Church in the United States in 1886 at the age of 31.

Research by the Centers for Disease Control finds that one in nine women experience postpartum depression, a depression that occurs after having a baby. Some postpartum depression experiences last longer and are felt in different ways than others.

Dr. Matthew Broom, SLUCare pediatrician at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital said that anywhere between 15 and 30 percent of women experience some sort of postpartum depression.

We all know staring directly in the sun is a bad thing, right? But, on the other hand, we’re told that viewing the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 will be an awesome sight to behold. How do you reconcile the two?

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed proper eye safety for the upcoming eclipse and answered your questions. Joining the program to share their insight were Dr. Carl Bassi, director of research for the UMSL College of Optometry, and Dr. Larry Davis, dean of the UMSL College of Optometry. 

Here’s what you need to know:

For the past 32 seasons, St. Louis Shakespeare has presented Shakespeare plays and other classics. This season, the company’s 33rd, kicks off on Friday night with the non-Shakespearean production of “Is He Dead?”

The Paris-set play was originally written by Missouri’s own Mark Twain, lost for 100 years, and recently adapted by David Ives. Edward Coffield is directing the production for St. Louis Shakespeare featuring a cast of 10.

Wednesday, Aug. 9 marks the third year since the police shooting death of Michael Brown Jr. in Ferguson, which set off a wave of protests and activism in the St. Louis region and across the nation.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed how these events have changed (or not changed) St. Louis in the three years after. We heard from myriad listeners through tweets, emails, voicemails and calls about the changes they've seen in their lives. You may click through some of their reflections in the slideshow above.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we’ll go “Behind the Headlines.” This week, we discussed the current issues impacting African-American people in the LGBTQ community.

This week, St. Louis is host to a national conference sponsored by the Metropolitan Community Church of Greater St. Louis called “Grounded in Love,” running through Aug. 5.

If you have someone in your life who is living with dementia, it can oftentimes be difficult to connect with that person. A new design movement, using person-centered techniques, seeks to aid that process for dementia patients and for the people who care for them.

A new UMSL graphic design class pairs design students one-on-one with dementia patients at a local nursing facility.

This segment was originally produced on November 26, 2016 and re-aired on August 8, 2017.

Charles Clement Holt was many things: an engineer, a draftsman, a surveyor for the St. Louis Streets Department. He became so good at the latter that he eventually became head of the Streets Department.

Whether you’re new to St. Louis or you’ve been here a long time, you’ve probably heard the factoid that Forest Park is bigger than New York’s Central Park by nearly 500 acres, clocking in at a total of 1,293 acres. It’s one of the many things we love about the park.

But how did the park come to be and how has it changed over time to become what it is today?

If you’ve happened to glance through an old family album, it is likely you’ve found photographs still around from over a century ago. Perhaps, too, you’ve found old letters your grandparents wrote one another or an old ticket stub to the movies.

These artifacts help build a more complete story of the lives of those from yesteryear. Those stories are important on a personal and institutional level when it comes to collective memory.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, our friends at Sauce Magazine joined host Don Marsh to discuss the restaurant openings and closings you should know to plan your nights out in August.

Managing editors Catherine Klene and Heather Hughes joined the program to fill us in on this month’s “Hit List.” Here are their recommendations:

On May 2, St. Louis Public Radio hosted The Story Collider, a national podcast and live storytelling group, for an evening of personal stories about science told on stage under the theme of "Eclipse." The event was sponsored by the St. Louis Storytelling Festival.

Eli Chen, St. Louis Public Radio’s science and environment reporter, shared a story at the event. We heard her story on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air. Listen here:

Last week marked the 64th anniversary of the end of the Korean War. St. Louisan and Korean War veteran Leonard Adreon recently published a memoir reflecting on his participation in America’s “forgotten war" as a Marine Corpsman, providing medical aid in battle. 

Next week, the Open Highway Music Festival will return to St. Louis for its sixth year at Off Broadway.

John Henry, a local musician and talent buyer at Off Broadway, is one of the festival organizers. He joined St. Louis on the Air contributor Steve Potter to discuss how the festival has evolved over the years and what to expect this year.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, our Legal Roundtable convened to discuss pressing issues of the law.

The conversation turned to Missouri's new abortion regulations, government and religion, President Trump's tweeted ban on transgender soldiers in the military, new standards for Missouri’s municipal courts, turnover in Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner's office, St. Louis' Medium Security Institution, a new chief justice of Missouri Supreme Court, and more.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines with a top news story from the week. This week, we delved into the effects on pro abortion rights advocates and organizations of the legislation passed on July 25 to place further restrictions on abortion in Missouri.

July 27 marked the 100th day in office for St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson.

She joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh in-studio for the full hour on Thursday, discussing her accomplishments thus far, missed opportunities and what challenges she foresees ahead.

While on the program, she addressed:

If you’ve undertaken any kind of home renovation project, you’ve probably encountered a few, well, we’ll call them pleasant surprises.

But they’re likely nowhere near the size of the surprises that Josh Wilson and Jason Watson, the executive director and Beyond Jobs director at local nonprofit Mission: St. Louis, have found in a move they recently made from a 5,000-square-foot building in the Forest Park Southeast neighborhood to a historic. 87,000 square-foot building in the JeffVanderLou neighborhood.

Come Aug. 21, NASA will be in Jefferson City, one of seven cities chosen from which to broadcast a live feed of the total solar eclipse.

Puns. You may laugh. You may cry. And if one is particularly bad, you may even groan.

For St. Louis punny-man Fred Firestone, a well-done pun should never be considered the lowest form of humor.

“Commonly-held wisdom is that you hear a pun and associate it with a groan, but our objective is that it can be knee-slapper if done right,” Firestone told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

For 35 years, Joe Finnigan spent time at the top of the FleishmanHillard food chain, handling such prestigious and controversial accounts as Anheuser-Busch in the 1970s and 80s and growing the public relations firm to national prominence.

In his recent memoir, Feisty: Chronicles & Confessions of an Old PR Warhorse, Finnigan shares what it was like as a VP and senior partner at the St. Louis-based company.

Could a St. Louis game producer be responsible for the next Cards Against Humanity or Minecraft? On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed what turns out to be a bustling independent game production community in St. Louis.

There are several dozen tabletop game developers and hundreds of professional (and hobbyist!) digital game developers located in the St. Louis region. At the last St. Louis Game Jam, a weekend-long meetup where people develop a game, over 300 people attended, making it the second biggest jam in the country.

It has been 37 years since the classic comedy “9 to 5” hit the big screen, starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and Dolly Parton as three working women fantasizing (and living out!) dreams of overthrowing their sexist boss. The film is the 20th highest-grossing comedy film and, in 2009, it was turned into a successful Broadway musical.

This April marked 100 years since the United States declared war on Germany and officially entered into World War I. But before the United States officially entered the war, the country was preparing heavily for involvement. An exhibit at the St. Louis County Parks’ Jefferson Barracks Historic Site highlights those efforts and what eventually drew the country to war.

When St. Louisan Gabe Weil was a child, he was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a severe form of the hereditary disease that decreases muscle mass and produces progressive weakness over time. Life expectancy for those with the disease is short, but Weil made it his goal to get a college degree.

In December 2013, Weil did just that, graduating from Washington University, at which point doctors also told him he was misdiagnosed and might live well into his 50s. He had to start rethinking how he would approach his life knowing he had many more years.

A local non-profit is teaching essential life and job skills through a year-round artist apprenticeship program that pays teens to work on art projects around the region and matches them with artistic mentors. The program is called St. Louis ArtWorks.

"Atomic Homefront" director Rebecca Cammisa grew up in New York and had long been familiar with environmental remediation efforts there before she first came to St. Louis to shoot a film about the legacy of nuclear waste here.

Her documentary, which was acquired by HBO, and will be screened tonight at the St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase, charts the history of atomic waste in St. Louis associated with the Manhattan Project and the citizen activist movement here to have it dealt with.

Maybe you've heard it suggested that as the impacts of climate change are felt more keenly in the coming century and sea levels rise, that people living on the coasts will move inward to the Midwest … a place like St. Louis, for example.

A recent New York Times article suggests that prospect may even be a little warmer than initially expected. What can we expect the St. Louis of the future, under the impacts of climate change, will be like?

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