Kelly Moffitt

Online producer for St. Louis Public Radio's talk shows St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

A new business accelerator program seeks to put entrepreneurs on a fast track to advancing innovative energy solutions.

The application deadline to the competitive Ameren Accelerator program is May 12th.

Each year for the next three years, five to seven recipients will receive office space in the Cortex Innovation Community and $100,000 in exchange for 8 percent equity in the company – all told, about $1 million in perks and benefits that are part of the highly structured 12-week program.

On Friday’s “Behind the Headlines” with St. Louis on the Air, we took an in-depth look at some of the top news stories of the week.

Joining us on this week’s edition was St. Louis Public Radio Political Reporter Jason Rosenbaum.

This weekend, St. Louis will play host to a local People’s Climate March. The event is spearheaded by a new local grassroots group called 350 STL, which is part of an international organizing collective called 350.org.

Next Tuesday, St. Louis will play host to Story Collider, a traveling storytelling show that records stories about science.  The event’s theme is “Eclipse” and will feature five storytellers from the St. Louis region, in partnership with the 38th annual St. Louis Storytelling Festival, which takes places May 3-6.

This weekend will be the last for a performance of “My Country: A Devised Work,” a play presented by the UMSL's Theatre and Cinema Arts department, which was inspired by Sam Beadle’s poem “My Country.”

There are neighborhoods in St. Louis that are thriving and those that are very much struggling, but what about neighborhoods that fall somewhere in the middle? On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the idea of "middle neighborhoods," which comes from a recent research study called "On the Edge: America's Middle Neighborhoods," published by American Assembly.

Irish singer and fiddle player Eimear Arkins first came to the United States to Missouri for university. After completing her degree, she headed home to Ireland for a while, returning to St. Louis in 2014 to stay. With her, Arkins brought her fiddle and a singing voice steeped in Irish folk singing tradition from County Clare.

On Wednesday, St. Louis on the Air’s monthly legal roundtable returned to address pressing issues of the law with a panel of local legal experts.

U.S.-China political and economic relations may make headlines frequently today, but the connection between the two countries is hundreds of years old in terms of immigration, business and culture.

On Saturday, the St. Louis Blues defeated the Minnesota Wild, moving on to the next level of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Next, they’ll take on the Nashville Predators.

“The Minnesota Wild are a really strong team with a lot of weapons,” said Blues President and CEO Chris Zimmerman. “It took great goaltending and our guys stepping up to get by them. For many people that was a surprise to see us winning in five games. Nashville is playing really well. You don’t sweep the Chicago Blackhawks without being an outstanding team.”

At first, it might be hard to understand the appeal of kombucha, a food trend that has made its way from the coasts to St. Louis. A fermented tea drink that’s made using a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast sitting atop brewed tea that often tastes like vinegar? Sounds iffy.

Last April, KSDK Anchor Anne Allred hadn’t given a thought to organ donation. She was preparing to have a baby in August and balancing life as an evening anchor of KSDK news.

A year later, everything is different for Allred as she marks this year’s National Donate Life Month. In the past year, she faced the premature birth of her daughter, Nora, and her extended stay in the NICU, severe renal failure due to a rare kidney disorder, dialysis and an eventual kidney transplant.

On Friday’s “Behind the Headlines” with St. Louis on the Air, we took an in-depth look at some of the top news stories of the week.

This week, for the first time in 16 years, St. Louis saw the inauguration of a new mayor: Lyda Krewson. She also happens to be the city’s first female mayor ever.

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The concept of a library is over 5,000 years old, but that doesn’t mean these community institutions are stuck in the Stone Age. On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard from librarians from two different communities in the region, in Ferguson, Mo., and Fairmont City, Ill., and how they are innovating exactly what the concept of a library is.

Spring is here and that certainly means one thing: St. Louis Cardinals baseball season is upon us.

In honor of the season, on Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we’ll hear from former St. Louis Cardinals pitcher -turned-outfielder Rick Ankiel about his new book, “The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips and the Pitch that Changed My Life."

When Meredith Littlejohn died, her parents Steve Littlejohn and Stefanie London had spent over a year in and out of the hospital with her for treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia. It wasn’t AML that killed Meredith, but rather an antibiotic-resistant infection she developed in the hospital while her immune system was compromised.

Antibiotic-resistant infection is a rising issue in American society and thousands of people die each year when they develop infections that no antibiotic can control.

Filmmaker Henry Hampton grew up in segregated St. Louis, Richmond Heights to be specific, during the 1940s. He would go on to found a film production company called Blackside, Inc. in Boston. His company produced over 80 documentaries and other productions and most notably created “Eyes on the Prize.”

The 14-part documentary is considered one of the most influential and definitive documentaries about the 30 years encompassing what Americans call the civil rights movement era, from Emmett Till to the Black Panthers.

In her daily work at College Bound, Keisha Mabry, the organization’s director of innovation, administers a text messaging app for students called Bridgit 2 College, which connects high school graduates who’ve been accepted to colleges with people to send them reminders about deadlines to meet and experiences to prepare for when they go to college.

This week, health-care professionals and families are making a point to talk about a subject that can be very difficult for some: end-of-life decisions. This week marks National Healthcare Decisions week.

Miles Davis. Katherine Dunham. Jackie Joyner-Kersee. These are three household names you may know who have connections to East St. Louis. But they are not the only African-American East St.

When people think of the issues faced by veterans in their return to civilian life, the mind often goes to stereotypes: trauma, PTSD, disability. That’s not the only story to tell, said Jonathan Hurly, president of the Saint Louis University Veterans Association.

On April 7, the world lost Patricia McKissack, a famed children’s book author who made her home in St. Louis. She died of a heart attack at age 72.

On Friday’s "Behind the Headlines" on St. Louis on the Air, we  took an in-depth look at one of the top news stories of the week.

On this week’s program, St. Louis Public Radio Statehouse Reporter Marshall Griffin joined us to give us an update on the political happenings Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City. No Missouri budget has yet been passed, but the the General Assembly has been busy passing other bills.

Read more of Marshall's reporting this week here

Thursday, April 13, 2017 marked the 274th anniversary of the birth of American founding father Thomas Jefferson.

On St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh looked back on the complicated legacy of the United States' third president and explored the impact of his presidency regionally with Washington University professor Peter Kastor.

A recent report by the United Way and the Public Policy Research Center at the University of Missouri-St. Louis found that 43 percent of all St. Louis metropolitan area households (encompassing 16 counties) do not have the monthly income to meet their basic living expenses. Basic living expenses include housing, food, transportation, taxes, health care and child care.

Last month, with the launch of the aptly-titled “Weatherbird One,” the St. Louis Post-Dispatch made a foray into a new newsgathering realm: drone journalism.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the ethics of drone journalism with David Carson, photographer with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and Mickey Osterreicher, general counsel with the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA).

Here’s a glance at what that looks like: 

The Department of Housing and Urban Development recently awarded a $29.5 million grant to a team of developers to revitalize and transform the Near North Side neighborhood, which encompasses an area directly north of downtown St. Louis. The area runs from the riverfront to Jefferson Avenue on the west side and Washington Avenue on the south side to St. Louis Avenue near the Old North neighborhood on the north side.

Last week, ProPublica and Consumer Reports released a first-of-its-kind analysis of car insurance premiums and payouts in California, Illinois, Texas and Missouri. Following a nearly year and a half investigation into premiums in those states, ProPublica found that residents of minority neighborhoods, on the whole, had to pay more for their car insurance premiums compared with white areas with similar “riskiness.”

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, NPR Newscaster Jack Speer joined host Don Marsh to discuss his career, reporting from Washington D.C. post-election and how things are going at NPR.

Speer, who prior to joining the newscast unit in 2007 worked for NPR’s business desk since 1998, has covered the nation’s top business and economic news.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by St. Louis’ longest-serving mayor, Francis G. Slay. This interview happened during Slay’s last week in office, after his 16-year tenure at the helm of the city.

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