Kelly Moffitt

Online producer for St. Louis Public Radio's talk shows St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape.

It was Thursday night, the day before Holocaust Remembrance Day on Friday, Jan. 27, 2017. St. Louis-based Jewish educator and technologist Russel Neiss and his friend across the country, Rabbi Charlie Schwartz, had put their heads together.

Last week, President Donald Trump signed a series of executive orders that sent the lives of many into chaos — in St. Louis and across the world.

A Parkway School District and Mizzou Veterinary School grad, James Rollins, is a bestselling author of over 30 books, including the Tucker Wayne and Jake Ransom novels. He recently released his 33rd book, “The Seventh Plague,” the next book in the Sigma series.

On Tuesday, he joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss the novel, his writing process and how he has managed to become such a prolific author in so little time.

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine is back and ready to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants during the month of February.

On Thursday, Catherine Klene and Matt Sorrell, the magazine’s managing editor and staff writer, respectively, will join St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss the openings and closings of restaurants you should know. Here's the full list with explanation from Sauce about why you should try the places they recommend.

The past year, 2016, will set a record for the number of drug overdose deaths in the St. Louis region. While still collecting data, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse – St. Louis Area is expecting a total of 630-640 deaths from overdoses in the past year, most of them opioid related and most impacting younger St. Louisans.

Nathaniel Ayers may not yet be a household name in classical music, but you surely know who he is. The  prodigy’s story was depicted in the 2009 film “The Soloist” by actor Jamie Foxx. It was Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez who discovered Ayers in 2005 and originally wrote a book about him, by the same title.

Some 2,000 St. Louisans boarded busses to attend the March for Life in Washington D.C. last Friday. The anti-abortion march marked its 44th year this year. It was originally created in protest of the United States Supreme Court’s decision legalizing abortion in Roe v. Wade.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard from two local participants in the national march. Reagan Barklage is the western regional director of the Students for Life of America.

The St. Louis Theater Circle on Friday released its 2017 award nominees for locally produced professional theater in 2016. This is the fifth year of the awards.

Max & Louie Productions’ “Grey Gardens,” received the top number of nominations, with 11, followed closely by The Rep’s “Follies,” with 10. Some 60 productions received nominations.

The production company leading nominations numbers was The Rep, with 24 nominations, followed by St. Louis Shakespeare, with 11 nominations. In total, 27 production companies had nominations.

For eight years, Sauce Magazine has put together its “Ones to Watch” list, highlighting up-and-coming talent in the St. Louis dining industry. On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard about some of the chefs, brewers, general managers and bakers.

American trust in the media is falling to new lows, unaided by President Donald Trump’s outspoken negative views of the press and news organizations. But in a time where “fake news” and “alternative facts” swirl about us like smoke from a fire, the need for journalists fact-checking and combing through truths and lies is more important than ever.

If you’re from St. Louis, you know that the region was the epicenter of the nation’s first pop music in the 1800s — ragtime. But St. Louis has contributed much more to the nation’s music legacy.

The Sidney Street Shakers, a local jazz group that solely plays St. Louis jazz of the 1920s, want to bring awareness to that legacy.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the idea of “smart growth” in the St. Louis region with organizers of an upcoming conference called the New Partners for Smart Growth Conference.

The conference was started in 1995 by the Environmental Protection Agency but has grown to include many other partners. This year, it will take place in St. Louis from Feb. 2-4. 

If you’ve ever wondered where in the world the “natural bridge” in Natural Bridge Road comes from, you’re not alone. The answer is tied to Missouri's abundance of caves and the underground world of St. Louis.

It’s a question Joe Light, vice president of the Meramec Valley Grotto and member of the Missouri Speleological Survey, gets asked all the time. Several Curious Louis questioners have wondered the same thing.

On Tuesday, St. Louis on the Air’s monthly legal roundtable returned to address pressing issues of the law.

This April, for the first time in 16 years, voters in the city of St. Louis will elect a new mayor. St. Louis Public Radio, along with 13 other community and media organizations will host a mayoral forum on Feb. 22, with candidates who qualify.

The trend of rural to urban migration across the world has been well-documented and is going strong. But what about people who migrate the opposite way? Or who choose to live a life outside of the traditional American economy? These people choose a different life with different challenges, but they also make up a community all their own.

Telling stories has been a part of human communities since time immemorial. Today, intentional groups are forming to preserve and enhance the art in St. Louis.

This segment originally aired on ​St. Louis on the Air on Sept. 8, 2016. It will be rebroadcast at 10 p.m. on Jan. 20, 2017.

Norris Roberts’ mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease nine years before she died. Over that time period, Roberts and his father tried to do everything right.

Every other week, they’d take her to the beauty shop she always went to so she could socialize. They bought her similar-styled clothes when the old ones no longer fit. They even kept up her tradition of Sunday night family dinners.

Love it, hate it, don’t get enough of it — we can all agree that a healthy relationship with sleep is integral to a successful life.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the latest in sleep research and answered your questions about sleep with Paul Shaw, an associate professor of neuroscience with Washington University’s School of Medicine.

Daniel D’Oca, a professor in the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, recently turned his Fall 2016 Urban Planning and Design Studio into a case study in making accessible solutions for fair housing and urban segregation — in St. Louis.

He and a group of students studied the history of housing policy in the metropolitan area and how segregation contributed to the protests in Ferguson.

Tuesday, Aug. 9, marked two years since the police shooting death of Michael Brown. What's changed over those two years? What hasn't? What feelings does the day bring up for you?

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh and Pastor F. Willis Johnson, of Wellspring Church in Ferguson, reflected on the day and listened to your thoughts, two years later, about policing, protest, Ferguson, St. Louis and how our nation has changed since the death of Michael Brown.

The results of Missouri’s primary are in and there were some pretty big surprises on city, county and state levels.

On July 6, St. Louis Public Radio hosted Missouri's GOP gubernatorial contenders ahead of the August primary so you could hear their stances during a debate. Scroll down to listen to the audio, watch a video of the debate or read our reporters' analysis of the night.

The Missouri legislative session starts on January 6 and ends in mid-May. As politicians converge on Jefferson City prepared to debate bills in the state House of Representatives and Senate, “St. Louis on the Air” assembled a panel to discuss the upcoming session.

On Monday’s show, we discussed what’s likely to happen, what’s unlikely to happen and what to keep an eye on. Joining the show:

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