Kristofor Husted

Harvest Public Media Reporter

Before joining KBIA in July 2012, Kristofor Husted reported for the science desk at NPR in Washington. There, he covered health, food and environmental issues. His work has appeared on NPR’s health and food blogs, as well as with WNYC, WBEZ and KPCC, among other member stations. As a multimedia journalist, he's covered topics ranging from the King salmon collapse in Northern California to the shutdown of a pollution-spewing coal plant in Virginia. His short documentary, “Angela’s Garden,” was nominated for a NATAS Student Achievement Award by the Television Academy.

Husted was born in Napa, Calif., and received his B.S. in cell biology from UC Davis, where he also played NCAA water polo. He earned an M.S. in journalism from Medill at Northwestern University, where he was honored as a Comer scholar for environmental journalism. 

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The massive Trans Pacific Partnership , or TPP, trade deal could require some countries to accept more genetically engineered crops. The TPP is the largest free trade agreement in history, and while not yet approved by Congress, includes the U.S. and 11 other countries along the Pacific Ocean. Here’s how genetically engineered crops figure into the equation:

New federal guidelines for healthy eating announced Thursday do not urge Americans to eat less meat, delivering a big win to Midwest meat farmers and ranchers. Initial recommendations by scientific advisors suggested Americans could be more environmentally friendly by cutting back on meat. Although the final version of the dietary guidelines issued every five years by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services propose teenage and adult men reduce their intake of protein, there is no specific request to eat less meat.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

At the Country Club Plaza shopping center in Kansas City, Missouri, customers bring their purchases to Melissa Anderson. She’s been wrapping gifts here for five years. Today she’s wrapping a box from a clothing store. The off-white paper has ornately interlocking gold lines. She said opening a gift is an experience.

Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

After the patent on one of the most popular versions of genetically engineered soybeans expired this year, U.S. universities are creating new generic GMO soybean varieties, many of which are designed to guard against specific, local pests. Ninety percent of soybean seeds planted in the U.S. are genetically engineered to withstand herbicides . Often that’s glyphosate, the weed-whacking ingredient in Roundup, developed by the behemoth seed company Monsanto . The glyphosate-resistant trait...

Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

The amount of ethanol blended into the U.S. fuel supply will go up under new rules issued Monday. In releasing the details of the Renewable Fuel Standard , the policy that sets the amount of biofuels oil refiners must blend into the fuel supply, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to continue to increase the proportion renewable fuels, most of which is comprised of corn ethanol.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

As the dust settles at the University of Missouri this week, two university administrators’ jobs have been left in the wake . Students have been protesting a lack of action on the university’s part to racist incidents on campus. The situation made national headlines when the school’s football team got involved to support the cause. Experts say that kind of student-athlete influence is growing and universities have to pay attention to that economic and cultural pull.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

On the same day the University of Missouri System president resigned, the chancellor of the Columbia campus has also announced he will be stepping down at the end of the year. Just hours after UM System President Tim Wolfe announced his resignation , Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin said he will also be stepping down.

tim wolfe
Janet Saidi / KBIA

University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe issued an apology Friday for his behavior with the group Concerned Student 1950. Members of the group blocked his car during the homecoming parade in protest of how the administration has handled incidents of racism at MU. Wolfe also notes in his apology that he has met with graduate student Jonathan Butler, who has been on a hunger strike calling for Wolfe’s resignation or removal.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

The immigrant workers that pick crops like cotton and melons in the U.S. can have a tough time finding a place to live. The rural areas where they can find work often lack the social services and affordable housing. That means many farm worker families end up in dilapidated buildings, which can come with health risks.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

All week, Harvest Public Media’s series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet. While the average American eats hundreds of pounds of meat every year, many U.S. consumers are starting to cut back as health experts learn more about the risk of a diet high in proteins from meat and environmentalists challenge the way most meat is raised. That leaves farmers and ranchers to raise meat animals with health-conscious meat-eaters in mind.

Flickr / Natalie Maynor

The US Department of Agriculture awarded a grant to help low-income families access affordable, healthful food in Boone County. About $150,000 dollars was granted to better connect families in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, to fresh food at the farmers market.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

After years of work, U.S. negotiators on Monday announced agreement on a trade deal with 11 Pacific Rim nations that is expected to expand export opportunities for U.S. farmers. The 11 countries included in the deal, called the Trans-Pacific Partnership or TPP , already import some 42 percent of U.S. agricultural exports at a value of $63 billion, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department .

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Map of Community Improvement Districts and Registered Voters Full screen map view When property owners in commercial neighborhoods want to clean up their block, they sometimes turn to creating special tax districts. These districts use tax hikes to pay for aesthetic and safety improvements. But what happens when you cut out the public from having a voice on those taxes? That public exclusion has created a mess in Columbia’s Business Loop District and locals are irked about the process.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

The Obama administration is challenging America to reduce food waste by half in 15 years. In an announcement Wednesday, officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency said they would team up with food retailers, charity groups and local governments to meet that goal.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Creators of Columbia’s Business Loop Community Improvement District, or CID, say the borders of the district were drawn specifically to include parcels of land fronting the Business Loop 70 – not to explicitly cut out voters. Critics of the CID have said borders were drawn keep voters from having a say in a sales-tax election. Chairman Tom May said Thursday at a board meeting that the properties included in the district were meant to include the businesses on plots of land that sat directly on Business Loop 70.

vote here sign
KBIA file photo

A majority of the 14 registered voters living in Columbia’s Business Loop Community Improvement District, or CID, have been casting ballots over the past few years. If the CID board were to pursue a half-cent sales tax increase, these 14 voters could cast the deciding votes. Without voters in the district, property owners could push through the tax hike. After one voter was discovered, the board postponed the election. A recent KBIA investigation revealed an additional 13 voters in the district bringing the total to 14.

Image and Interactive Map by James Gordon; CID boundary from City of Columbia, Voter data from Boone County Clerk

Thirteen additional voters have turned up in the controversial Business Loop Community Improvement District, or CID, after an investigation by the KBIA newsroom. The board of the Business Loop CID has been criticized for gerrymandering to exclude all voters. In doing so, property owners in the CID would legally be able to levy a sales tax increase of a half-cent without voter approval.

Sarah Kellogg / KBIA

After learning that a single resident has the ability to vote on a half-cent sales tax, the Columbia Business Loop’s Community Improvement District Board decided to postpone the election. When the board members originally proposed a half-cent sales tax for the Business Loop 70 district, they didn’t think anyone lived in the district. In that case, the vote would be left to property owners. But it turns out, University of Missouri student Jen Henderson lives within the Community Improvement...

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

To the chagrin of some of the nation’s largest farm organizations, the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday forged ahead with a plan to oversee more of the nation’s waterways, saying it will enforce new pollution rules in all but 13 states covered by an ongoing court case. On the day the so-called “Waters of the U.S.” rules, or WOTUS, were set to go into effect, the EPA stuck to the deadline, despite a court order issued late Thursday.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

The end of summer is state fair season across the Midwest. That means lots of fried food, carnival rides and livestock competitions. But at most fairs, there’s also a whole lot more. If you missed the fair… fear not. Here are some of the sights and sounds of the Missouri State Fair.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

Kendra Lawson doesn’t have the typical schedule of a nine–year-old. With just a week of summer left, she spent her days working with her dad and mom on the farm and preparing her pigs to show at the state fair. Here in central Missouri, the Lawson family raises cattle and pigs with a lot of help from Kendra. I met her at her house near Centralia, Mo., where she had just come back from helping her dad in the hay fields.

Wikimedia commons / Ken Hammond

The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing stricter regulations for pesticide applicators. Under the guidelines, workers who spray some of the most hazardous pesticides would need to be at least 18 years old, renew their certifications every three years and take specialized training for certain chemicals.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

Chert Hollow Farm sits nestled between rows of tall trees and a nearby stream in central Missouri. Eric and Joanna Reuter have been running the organic farm since 2006. That means they don’t plant genetically modified crops and can only use a few approved kinds of chemicals and fertilizers .

Missouri Supreme Court
Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

The Missouri Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that state’s so-called Right To Farm amendment remains constitutional. The Right to Farm amendment is meant to protect Missouri farmers from new laws that would change current farm practices. It was added to the state Constitution in August 2014 by a slim margin of votes. Critics, including many small farmers and animal rights groups, say the ballot language was misleading to voters and opens the door for foreign corporations to exploit Missouri farmland.

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

In the U.S., one in six people struggles with hunger. Food pantries across the country pass out food to help these people put meals on the table. But what if they could help teach the pantry visitors how to grow their own food, too? Grow Well Missouri , a program that travels to food pantries around central Missouri, is trying to do just that, passing out seeds and starter plants to low-income locals. On a recent wet, spring morning, the group was set up in Columbia, Mo. Four volunteers for Grow Well Missouri worked under a blue popup tent outside of Central Pantry, repotting about 50 starter tomato plants into larger containers. They had a steady stream of visitors stopping by, curious about what’s going on.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

When it comes to hazardous work industries, farming is in the top three with transportation and warehousing, and mining. And many times after an accident, farmers end up as amputees. But when farmers and ranchers lose a limb on the job, they have a limited selection of prosthetics to help get them back to the fields. Farmer Brian Fleischmann lost part of his right arm in 1996. He still farms today just outside Jefferson City, Mo. “I continue to try to do everything I used to do before the accident,” he said. “I'll be honest with you. It takes me a lot longer and it's a lot harder on me.”

Kristofor Husted/KBIA/Harvest Public Media

On May 20th , KBIA held a community conversation event in Kennett , Mo. The goal was to bring local residents and leaders of rural southeast Missouri to the same table to discuss difficulties in access to health care, the struggling rural economy and how to fix it. It's an event we called Health Barriers: Symptoms of a Rural Economy.

chickens
Grace Hood / Harvest Public Media

Tyson Foods, the country’s largest poultry producer, says it will stop feeding its chickens antibiotics that are used to treat humans. The company says it plans to eliminate the drugs in its broiler chicken flocks – chickens grown for meat – by September 2017.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

When President Obama announced late last year that he would work toward ending the embargo on trade with Cuba, it wasn't just tourists perking up their ears. Midwest farmers and ranchers see communist Cuba as an untapped market for goods from the American Heartland. Harvest Public Media's Kristofor Husted reports on how agriculture interests are looking to cash in.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA/Harvest Public Media

When President Obama announced in late 2014 that he would work toward ending the embargo on trade with Cuba, it wasn’t just tourists perking up their ears. Midwest farmers and ranchers see communist Cuba as an untapped market for goods from the American Heartland. One of those farmers is Paul Combs, a rice farmer from southeast Missouri. Cuba can be an important market for farmers like Combs, who already depend on exporting their products. “We’re excited about normalized relations with Cuba,” Combs said. “Until 1963, Cuba was the biggest market for U.S. rice.”

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