Kristofor Husted

Harvest Public Media Reporter

Before joining KBIA in July 2012, Kristofor Husted reported for the science desk at NPR in Washington. There, he covered health, food and environmental issues. His work has appeared on NPR’s health and food blogs, as well as with WNYC, WBEZ and KPCC, among other member stations. As a multimedia journalist, he's covered topics ranging from the King salmon collapse in Northern California to the shutdown of a pollution-spewing coal plant in Virginia. His short documentary, “Angela’s Garden,” was nominated for a NATAS Student Achievement Award by the Television Academy.

Husted was born in Napa, Calif., and received his B.S. in cell biology from UC Davis, where he also played NCAA water polo. He earned an M.S. in journalism from Medill at Northwestern University, where he was honored as a Comer scholar for environmental journalism. 

Ways To Connect

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

The pork business certainly has its challenges. Hog farmers continually grapple with high feed prices, environmental hiccups and criticism from animal welfare groups. But some producers are creating a path to profitability by pursuing smaller, more specialized markets. From Iowa, Harvest Public Media’s Amy Mayer has the story of Eden Farms.

If you really love your peaches and want to shake a tree, there's a map to help you find one. That goes for veggies, nuts, berries and hundreds of other edible plant species, too.

Abbie Fentress Swanson / Harvest Public Media

Gluten-free diets. They bar most beers, breads and cakes among other foods, because they contain wheat, rye and barley. The trendy diet is wildly popular today which is surprising, given that experts estimate only about 1 percent of the U.S. population suffers from Celiac disease, the disorder that causes their immune systems to reject the pesky gluten. But as Harvest Public Media’s Abbie Fentress Swanson reports, this diet fad and others are largely driven by Americans’ growing appetite for food solutions to their health woes.

Reinventionstories.org

Hostess. Nordyne. Fuqua Building Systems. AP Green.

The shutdown of all these plants signaled the loss of hundreds of Missouri jobs. Now imagine if it was just one powerhouse plant that helped define a city – a city known for its innovation and production.

“Dayton, Ohio has a big legacy of invention,” filmmaker Steve Bognar says. “From the car starter, to the step ladder, to the pop top can, to the cash register [having been] invented here.”

But imagine that plant closes. How does a city of inventors reinvent itself in this new time?

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

Before the American Revolution, before the Civil War, before Lewis and Clark came through here, a huge tree has been standing in central Missouri, growing to 90-feet tall. The beloved bur oak – which everybody calls "The Big Tree" -- has survived floods, lightning strikes and all kinds of punishments during her 350 years on the prairie. But, as Harvest Public Media’s Peggy Lowe reports, last year’s record drought was especially hard on the Big Tree.

Over the last year or so, at least 20 states have introduced bills that would require labeling of genetically modified food. The common point of contention is the pervasiveness of grains that have had their DNA altered. But some of these proposed laws – including one in Missouri – take aim specifically at genetically engineered meat or fish. And that got Harvest Public Media’s Abbie Fentress Swanson wondering: How close are we to actually eating genetically engineered animals? What she found out might surprise you.

Coming up we’ll delve into a small school district trying to get a bond passed for the third time.

But first, grain elevators across the country store billions of bushels of farm products like corn and wheat. They’re a staple of rural communities. But the dust that piles up in grain storage facilities is highly combustible – it can be six times more explosive than gun powder. Just one spark can send a blast that will shake the ground for miles.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Missouri House rejects Democratic effort to expand Medicaid
  • Mamtek CEO makes bail
  • Rep. Hartzler and Mayor McDavid call for funding to keep airport tower open
Maria Altman / St. Louis Public Radio

Whole Foods Market recently announced that by 2018, all products in its U-S and Canadian stores containing genetically modified organisms will be clearly labeled as such. The decision by the grocery chain -- which has been labeling some products as non-GMO for years now -- has pushed this strongly debated food labeling issue into the shopping aisle.

The real action, though, is heating up in state legislatures across the country. Harvest Public Media’s Abbie Fentress Swanson explains.

Not many of us are chemists.

The Crash Reel on Facebook

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

When professional snowboarder Kevin Pearce crashed in the half-pipe in 2009, his life’s trajectory took a turn for the uncertain. After barely surviving a devastating head injury from the fall, Pearce’s recovery ultimately became more than just returning to full health.

Enter filmmaker Lucy Walker. In “The Crash Reel,” the Oscar-nominated documentarian opens a door to Kevin and his family as they struggle with how to handle Kevin’s injury and recovery. The intimate interactions between family members highlight the horrors of traumatic head injuries and the effects they have on loved ones.

Money
Andrew Magill

Coming up we’ll tackle sequestration which is set to occur March 1. But first, when a large group of farmers in the Southeast banded together to sue a powerful dairy cooperative a few years ago, many hoped that the case would bring big changes to the industry. But as Peggy Lowe of Harvest Public Media reports, the recent settlement of the case involving Kansas City-based Dairy Farmers of America has resulted in some money for small farmers in the short term but little long-term reform.

Courtesy of The Expedition to the End of the World

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

For three weeks, Danish filmmaker Daniel Dencik and his film crew drifted on an old wooden schooner through the remote arctic waters of Greenland. Also on board, a group of artists and scientists studied the changing landscape of northeastern Greenland and used it to answer questions for scientific research and existential definition. Dencik’s job was to capture this age-old tradition of artists and scientists searching for truth and meaning in a rarely navigated locale. (Think Columbus and other early explorers.)

dbking / Flickr

Airports in Columbia, Kansas City and St. Louis reopened but passengers were told to expect several cancellations, particularly in the morning.

American Airlines flight 3215 from Columbia to Dallas was canceled this morning, but the remaining flights are scheduled to take off and arrive as planned.

Lambert International Airport in St. Louis and Kansas City International Airport both closed Thursday after a massive snowstorm hit Missouri.

Women and Children's hospital
Wikipedia

Update Feb. 22 11:16 a.m.: 

The following Boone Health centers will remain closed today: Boone Convenient Care, Moberly, Boone Family Practice, Boone Infectious Disease, Boone Primary Care, Boone Pulmonary Clinic, Moberly Specialty Clinic and the Wound Clinic. Staying open for Boone Health is Boone Convenient Care Columbia, Boone Internal Medicine Associates, Centralia Family Health Clinic, Southern Boone County Family Care Clinic and Boone Hospital Home Care & Hospice.

Feb. 22 9:40 a.m.:

MU Health Care clinics are closed until Monday, Feb. 25. MU Health Care hospitals and emergency rooms remain open.

Original post:

In response to the winter storm, MU healthcare system officials activated the system’s command center to mobilize staff at 11:45 a.m. this morning.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency in Missouri Thursday in response to the severe winter storm hammering the state.

The storm system has been dumping a mix of snow and sleet since early Thursday morning. Weather forecasts predict parts of the state could see up to 10 inches of snow. Many roads and highways already are covered with snow.

Nixon’s emergency management team has been keeping the governor up to speed with the latest information on the storm and its effects. The State Emergency Operations Center has been monitoring the storm system since Wednesday.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Coming up we’ll kick off a three-part series from Harvest Public Media on the Science of the Seed. For the introductory report, Amy Mayer explores the origins of gene transformation.

But let’s first start in Columbia where as of February, landlords are required to maintain a list of all tenants. It’s part of a new occupancy limitation disclosure ordinance recently passed by the City Council. KBIA’s Andrew Yost reports that the ordinance deals with several overcrowding issues concerning neighbors.

Lukas Udstuen / KBIA

The most recent U.S. census shows the nation’s population is in flux. While some cities across the country are growing, many small towns are dwindling. KBIA’s Lukas Udstuen takes us to Goss, one of the smallest towns in Missouri. You might miss it if it weren’t for a few road signs marking its location along Route 24 in Monroe County. And you’re most likely out of luck if you stop in Goss for directions because the 2010 Census reported the town has zero residents.

Check out more details about how Goss came about and see an audio slide show here.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

Later, we check in with a revised Environmental Protection Agency standard that could help some wastewater treatment facilities struggling to comply with part of the Clean Water Act’s deadline.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • House GOP trying again to require photo IDs for voting
  • SEC entry yields another hefty gift for Mizzou
  • Gov. Nixon defends new plane purchase

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Sanders to remain Mo. Democratic Party leader
  • Beef labeling rule is caught in bureaucratic limbo
  • Economist casts doubt on Mo. business incentives

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Mo. House Speaker Tim Jones to give GOP response to state of the state
  • Mo. SOS Jason Kander giving public comment period on ballot initiatives
  • KC Medical School looking to open up shop in Joplin

roy blunt
TalkMediaNews / Flickr

The pentagon announced Thursday the lifting of a ban on women serving in combat. With the policy reversal, women will have the opportunity to serve in combat if they meet certain "gender-neutral standards."

Abbie Fentriss Swanson / Harvest Public Media

Farmers and ranchers across the country expected to start the New Year with a new farm bill, the all-important legislation setting agricultural policy for the next five years.

As House and Senate negotiators worked feverishly at the turn of the year to come to a fiscal cliff deal, word leaked that the Agriculture Committees had finally come to an agreement on a long-awaited new farm bill. But the final fiscal cliff deal ditched new legislation and merely extended parts of the bill that expired in October. Jeremy Bernfeld reports the extension left many farmers frustrated.

Regional new coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Gov. Nixon sets the special election date for Jo Ann Emerson's seat
  • Revamped GED to launch in 2014
  • Increase in passengers at St. Louis' Lambert Airport

Jay Nixon
KBIA file photo / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon plans to set June 4 as the special election date to fill the vacant seat in the Eighth District in southeast Missouri.

Rep. Jo Ann Emerson sent Nixon a letter Tuesday notifying him that her resignation from the seat would be effective at 11:59 p.m.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Columbia mayoral candidate Sam Allison has announced his withdrawal from the city-wide race.

students in classroom
Brad Flickinger / Flickr

Columbia Public Schools announced Wednesday an expansion of an electronic reading program throughout the district.  With the myON reader program, students can log on to a website and have access to thousands of free electronic books.

Superintendent Chris Belcher calls it “amazon.com” for kids. He says the district has purchased a password to access the site for every 4-year old in the district.

Jacob McCleland / KRCU

The lingering drought continues to keep the Mississippi River at historically low levels. But now the Army Corps of Engineers says the river will likely stay open for transportation at least through this month. But many grain and energy industries that send products up and down the river aren’t yet breathing a sigh of relief. Iowa Public Radio’s Clay Masters reports from the Corn Belt where a lot of grain begin its journey south down the Mississippi.

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Nixon Sworn In As Mo. Governor, Begins Second Term
  • Jovan Belcher autopsy results show he was drunk at time of crime
  • State Sen. John Lamping calls out Gov. Jay Nixon on Twitter

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Nixon calls for lengthening Mo. school year
  • Mo. auditor confirms insolvency of disability fund
  • Republican: Akin 'partly right' on rape comment

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