Kristofor Husted

Harvest Public Media Reporter

Before joining KBIA in July 2012, Kristofor Husted reported for the science desk at NPR in Washington. There, he covered health, food and environmental issues. His work has appeared on NPR’s health and food blogs, as well as with WNYC, WBEZ and KPCC, among other member stations. As a multimedia journalist, he's covered topics ranging from the King salmon collapse in Northern California to the shutdown of a pollution-spewing coal plant in Virginia. His short documentary, “Angela’s Garden,” was nominated for a NATAS Student Achievement Award by the Television Academy.

Husted was born in Napa, Calif., and received his B.S. in cell biology from UC Davis, where he also played NCAA water polo. He earned an M.S. in journalism from Medill at Northwestern University, where he was honored as a Comer scholar for environmental journalism. 

Ways To Connect

Samantha Sunne / KBIA

Water use has become a hot issue among Midwest farmers after this summer's drought. Nebraska irrigates more acres of farmland than any other state in the nation. Kansas is also near the top. And that Irrigation infrastructure helped some farmers keep the drought at bay this year. Their fields stayed green long after others withered away. But as Grant Gerlock reports for Harvest Public Media, using so much water now may force some farmers to use less water in the future.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

While the tables may be turning for U.S. Rep. Todd Akin as he regains some GOP support in his race for the U.S. Senate, the Democratic Party has filed ethics complaints against the congressman.  At Thursday's campaign stop in Columbia, the congressman remained positive about his campaign but vague about his definition of earmarks.

The complaints -- filed Wednesday -- allege Akin reversed his stance on earmarks to receive money from a Super PAC. Akin says he has never changed his position.

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

To dock or not to dock? That is the question.

Well, that’s the question some Midwest dairy farmers are debating now that the National Milk Producers Federation has taken a stand against the widespread practice of cutting off cow tails -- or tail docking. It started decades ago as a method to stop the spread of disease because the tails often becomes slimed with manure. Recent studies suggest the practice isn't necessarily effective, but many dairy farmers still employ the technique to avoid a face full of slimy cow tail.

Pumping gas
File Photo / KBIA

There’s a new kind of gas on the market, with more ethanol in it than the gas we usually put in our cars. That’s beneficial for corn farmers who grow the corn that ethanol is made from and want more of it in your gas. But while the ethanol industry fought for years to bring this fuel to the market, now that they’ve won… good luck finding it. Even in Corn Country, pickings are slim.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

UPDATE: 3:00 pm, Tuesday September 18:

Former Mamtek CEO Bruce Cole was arrested at his home in Dana Point, California on Tuesday after the Missouri Attorney General charged him with theft and fraud.

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster told reporters that Bruce Cole -- the former CEO of the now defunct company Mamtek -- has been charged with stealing and four counts of securities fraud.

CraneStation / Flickr

Growing across the Midwest is a strain of hybrid corn that should perform well under the driest conditions. Harvest Public Media’s Rick Fredericksen says this summer’s parched farmland is providing an ideal test.

Ladies, if the thought of showing up at a party or a picnic with a box of wine seems a little gauche, there's now a product for you: Vernissage's "bag-in-a-bag" of wine. It's boxed wine, shaped like a handbag.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • West Nile Virus strikes Mo. again
  • Sen. McCaskill visits MU to talk student loans
  • MU invests $2.5 million in online education

jeremy.wilburn / Flickr

Students in the Columbia Public School system who took Advanced Placement exams in 2012 outscored their peers across Missouri. Some of the district’s highest scores came in Psychology and Biology.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Sen. McCaskill roots out wasteful wartime spending
  • More Mo. youth covered by health insurance
  • Planned Parenthood supporters deliver petition to Rep. Akin

Adam Procter / Flickr

Updated 8/29/12 3:00 p.m.

The University of Missouri says it will keep its academic publishing business open and drop plans for a new reimagined publishing operation.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • New state laws take effect Tuesday
  • Rep. Akin reiterates stance on abortion, Sen. McCaskill talks veteran affairs
  • First Mo. death from West Nile

Kristian Molhave / Opensource Handbook of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

When fresh water animals, such as worms and mussels, were exposed to water loaded with carbon nanotubes, their health suffered, according to a new study published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. In fact, the bottom-dwelling critters didn’t grow as quickly and they didn’t survive as long as their counterparts living in cleaner water.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Apologetic Rep. Todd Akin chastised for "legitimate rape" comment
  • Sen. Claire McCaskill: Akin should be allowed to stay in race
  • MU enrollment numbers are up

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Missouri receives $6 million for transportation projects
  • Health care measure's language battled over in court
  • Quicksand popping up along rivers

As public school starts Thursday in both Columbia and Jefferson City, those school districts are dealing with a surge in student enrollment. To deal with this, the districts have hired several teachers at the last minute to maintain a healthy ratio of students to instructors.

Although enrollment numbers are expected to fluctuate for the next few weeks, Columbia and Jefferson City have added several teachers at the elementary level to accommodate the influx of younger students.

Camille Phillips / KBIA

The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education released the state’s 2012 school test scores Tuesday. And while the data show a small but fairly consistent improvement across most subjects, Columbia still has some work to do in a few categories.

The Missouri Assessment Program, or MAP, tests students from third grade through high school in areas such as communication arts, math and science. For the 2012 school year, the Columbia district met all 14 state standards to remain an accredited district.

Ben Skirvin / WFIU

A Missouri County jail inmate is back in custody after hijacking a car from a sheriff’s deputy.

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