Kyle Felling

Program Director

Kyle Felling was born in the rugged northwest Missouri hamlet of St. Joseph (where the Pony Express began and Jesse James ended). Inspired from a young age by the spirit of the early settlers who used St. Joseph as an embarkation point in their journey westward, Kyle developed the heart of an explorer and yearned to leave for adventures of his own. Perhaps as a result of attending John Glenn elementary school, young Kyle dreamed of becoming an astronaut, but was disheartened when someone told him that astronauts had to be good at math. He also considered being a tow truck driver, and like the heroes of his favorite childhood television shows (The A-Team and The Incredible Hulk) he saw himself traveling the country, helping people in trouble and getting into wacky adventures. He still harbors that dream.

Kyle's love of television also brought him into contact with a show called WKRP in Cincinnati. That show's fun depiction of a small Cincinnati radio station coupled with frequently being told that he had a "face for radio," planted the seeds of a broadcasting career in Kyle's head. (To this day Kyle considers WKRP's vision of radio to be eerily accurate, most notably in its depiction of sales staff.) Kyle began volunteering at KBIA during his first semester at the University of Missouri, and has been on the air on a regular basis ever since. His first air shift was 10 p.m. to 1 a.m., playing the Smooth Jazz likes of Kenny G, Russ Freeman and Candy Dulfer. In 1999 he began serving as the local host of All Things Considered, and has recently taken on added responsibility as KBIA's Program Director.

In his spare time, Kyle enjoys reading H.L. Mencken and T.S. Eliot, listening to the Violent Femmes, watching the Power Puff Girls and spending time with his niece Kylee Johnson. Kyle is a St. Louis Cardinals fan, a Macintosh partisan and can recite from memory Bob Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues," R.E.M.'s "It's the End of the World As We Know It (I Feel Fine)," and the St. Crispen's Day Speech from Henry V. He hopes to one day be an astronaut, Senator, or to marry the monarch of a small principality.

Ways to Connect

Missouri Department of Conservation

Head outside in mid-April and you’ll notice many trees springing into bloom. 

 

This week on Discover Nature, we pay special attention to an unwelcome invader: the Callery pear tree. 

 

Callery pears, which include the commonly known Bradford pear, are easily identifiable right now: deciduous trees reaching mature heights of 30-50 feet, with a pyramid-shaped crown covered in clusters of tiny white flowers with an unpleasant odor. 

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

As nighttime temperatures begin to climb and soil warms in Missouri’s woods, a fungal favorite of foragers begins to emerge. 

 

This week on discover nature, keep an eye to the ground for morel mushrooms. 

 

Morels are hollow-stemmed mushrooms, with a somewhat conical cap, covered with definite pits and ridges, resembling a sponge, pinecone, or honeycomb.  

 

These choice-edibles grow in a variety of habitats including moist woodlands and river bottoms. 

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on discover nature one of the oldest fish species alive today, and Missouri’s official state aquatic animal, is on the move. 

 

Paddlefish are related to sturgeon and sharks and are historically found in the big rivers of our state. 

 

This large bluish-gray fish with an elongated paddlelike snout, or rostrum, has no bones in its body, and adults have no teeth. Paddlefish swim slowly through water with their mouths wide open, collecting tiny crustaceans and insects in their elaborate gill-rakers. 

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

The lonesome calls of Missouri mornings on the prairie – once produced by hundreds of thousands of birds across our state – now hold the haunting story of a species nearly eliminated from our landscape

Each spring, male prairie chickens return to breeding grounds, called leks, to perform unique mating rituals. Each male defends his territory from competing cocks, inflating bright orange air sacs on his neck, and producing distinct “booming” call. 

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on discover nature, celebrate the first week of spring with a nature hike.

 

 

Spring brings new life to the outdoors: watch for young river otters near lakes and streams, bats leaving hibernation caves, wild turkeys, and turtles becoming active. 

 

The sounds of spring, alone, offer reason to rejoice. Listen for pileated woodpeckers drumming to establish territories, mourning doves cooing from their crop field nests, and the serenade of spring peepers at sunset.  

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

For thousands of years, fire has shaped natural communities in Missouri. This week on Discover Nature, watch for smoke and fire on the landscape. 

 

The first European explorers to document the Missouri wilderness noted American Indians’ use of fire to preserve grasslands for bison and promote regrowth of fruits, berries, and many other natural foods that flourish from periodic fires. 

 

Today, this ancient tool remains relevant as ever in managing pastures and woodlands for wildlife and food production, and combating invasive species. 

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature take a walk outside, and you may hear one of the first serenades of spring on the horizon.

  

   

 

Spring peepers have spent the winter burrowed under soil – a natural antifreeze in their blood keeping them thawed.  

 

One of the first species to begin calling in the spring, this small, slender frog can appear pink, gray, tan, or brown, with a dark ‘X’ on its back.

 

Roughly one-inch in length, they breed in fishless ponds, streams and swamps with thick undergrowth.  

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, we take a look at Missouri’s cousin to the kangaroo. 

 

The Didelphis virginiana, or the Virginia opossum, is the only marsupial found in Missouri.  These furbearers grow to 2-3 feet in length (including their 9-15 inch-long tails).  They prefer wooded areas near streams for habitat, though they’re common across the state and in urban areas.  

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

In the waning weeks of winter, one of North America’s most important game fishes begins to get active in Missouri. This week on Discover Nature, walleye are on the move. 

 

These slender, yellowish or olive-brown fish have large mouths with prominent teeth, and especially reflective eyes. 

 

Residing in large streams and reservoirs throughout the state, these nocturnal fish feed in shallow water at night, and retreat to deeper pools during the day. 

 

Missouri Department of Conservation

This week on Discover Nature, seldom-seen salamanders find love in late winter.


Radiolab on KBIA!

Apr 11, 2012

KBIA is excited to add Radiolab to our schedule. Radiolab is consistently one of the most engaging and enlightening programs on the radio and we’re thrilled to be able to share the new thirteen week season with our listeners.  Every episode of Radiolab is an exciting journey of discovery put together by some of the most innovative and talented people in public radio.  KBIA embraces the spirit of curiosity and exploration that has made Radiolab such a success and we’re confident that our listeners will embrace it as well.  Listen to Radiolab at Noon on Saturdays starting May 12.