Lara Hamdan

News intern

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Wednesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Since the fatal shooting of students in Florida in February, many young activists have organized walkouts, rallies and calls to action. On March 24, young people all over the country will take to the streets again in a nationwide rally they’re calling “March For Our Lives.”

Even with more awareness and updated policies surrounding the issue of sexual harassment, offensive advances and interactions in the workplace have not gone away. But have employers overlooked other ways to deal with the matter?

This segment will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Among the most notable celebrities to be born in St. Louis, Josephine Baker is at the top of the list.

It takes less than 20 minutes to drive between the Lewis Place and Holly Hills neighborhoods in St. Louis. Yet that relatively short trip from north to south  – or vice versa – is one that many people in the Gateway region are unlikely to take.

That’s according to Lewis Place resident Al Willis, who took a bus tour of Holly Hills along with a group of his neighbors in an effort to bridge economic, racial and geographic divides around the region. A contingent of Holly Hills residents participated in a tour of Lewis Place on the same day, and for both groups the experience proved eye-opening.

As National Catholic Sisters Week wraps up, host Don Marsh discussed the history and work of the 15 orders of Catholic Sisters in the St. Louis region on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air. Their work ranges from working with incarcerated women to children in shelters and elders.

This segment will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Tuesday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, producer Alex Heuer talked with science journalist Jon Cohen, a staff writer for Science Magazine, and documentary filmmaker Carl Gierstorfer about their work on HIV, AIDS and Ebola.

Both have received support from the Pulitzer Center for their reporting projects. Their work takes a look at the causes of diseases, the factors that allow them to spread and the stories of those impacted.

St. Louis-based Centene Corporation found itself in a precarious situation this week when a BuzzFeed News investigation uncovered that a troubled compounding pharmacy the company now owns sold drugs used in executions to the state of Missouri.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the potential impact of House Bill 2179. It would prohibit Missouri from entering into contracts over $10,000 with companies that engage in the boycott of, divestment from and sanctioning of Israel, an ally of the United States.

Filmmaker Paul Crane didn’t know much about homelessness until he happened across a tent city while walking around taking pictures in downtown St. Louis.

The blue tarps set up along the Mississippi riverfront sparked Crane’s curiosity and eventually led him to direct the documentary, "Living in Tents.”

For more than two decades, Nurses for Newborns have stepped in to help more than 100,000 families lacking in resources to care for their newborn babies.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the special election to replace the St. Louis 8th ward alderman. Joining him for the discussion were St. Louis Public Radio reporters Rachel Lippmann and Jason Rosenbaum.

The mother of a south St. Louis woman believed to have shot her infant, her husband and herself earlier this month says that her daughter suffered from postpartum depression.

“There’s no doubt about it,” Polly Fick told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday when asked if her daughter had postpartum depression. “But because of her background and working as a social worker, I think she was of the opinion that she could handle things.”

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about a St. Louis themed variety show featuring blues music, comedy and discussions about life in a divided city.

Joining the discussion were:

Encouraging young people and addressing racial equity are the tenets of Creative Reaction Lab’s (CRL) mission to create youth leaders that impact and shape their community’s futu

St. Louis has a history that involves grand stories of love – and loss. Renegade STL will “celebrate” those stories at an upcoming event at the Novel Neighbor on Feb. 14.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed interesting and obscure love and breakup stories that happened in St. Louis with Renegade STL. Joining the discussion were the organization’s founder Amanda Clark and business partner Elizabeth Eikmann.

Scott Kennebeck’s career as a singer is inextricably linked to his faith. The tenor is executive director of St. Louis Cathedral Concerts and he is the cantor at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Kennebeck about his multi-faceted career and the various audiences he’s performed for – ranging from Pope John Paul II’s St. Louis visit, a papal mass at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome to a St. Louis Blues game.

The St. Louis Chamber Chorus' will explore the human condition at a performance commemorating Valentine’s Day. The concert is highlighted by the world premiere of "Ardor Amis," a work the chorus commissioned from British composer Francis Pott.

The state of Illinois’ general primary elections are set to take place on March 20, 2018.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh went Behind the Headlines to discuss the Illinois governor’s race and other political issues in the state. Joining him for the discussion was WWTW “Chicago Tonight” correspondent Amanda Vinciky to talk about campaign specifics.

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Monday talked about renovations taking place at the Gateway Arch in advance of a planned reopening date of July 3.

KSDK news anchor Rene Knott is in South Korea covering the 2018 Winter Olympics.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, producer Alex Heuer talked with Knott about the highlights of his trip thus far. The biggest thing that stuck out to Knott was his visit to the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), a 2.5 mile wide border across the peninsula that separates North and South Korea.

The Olympic Games are historic festivals that showcase a wide variety of athletic talent – but they also go beyond sports entertainment.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, producer Alex Heuer talked to UMSL professor Susan Brownell, who is attending the Olympics in South Korea and plans to study them from an anthropological point of view.

The heart is a familiar symbol of love, but the diseases of the organ can kill. February is Heart Health Month, and we invited our heart expert Dr. Andrew Kates, professor of medicine and cardiologist with the Washington University Heart Care Institute at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, back on the program to help explain the matters of the heart.

The St. Louis Sports Commission (SLSC) announced that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) is granting each city that has hosted the games the chance to display two grand sculptures of the Olympic rings. St. Louis is among those cities and was even the first city in the United States to host the historic athletic competition.

Writer, producer and director Mark Krenzien’s 40-year-film career has led him on a long list of adventures. He’s worked on the “Making Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’” documentary, swam alongside humpback whales and often filmed in far-flung locations, including war-torn Iraq, earthquake ravaged Haiti and a giant NASA clean room.

The Women's Voices Raised for Social Justice advocacy program continues to bring awareness to critical issues in the region – this time for injustices disadvantaged youth in St. Louis are facing. Their upcoming program Juvenile Injustice: Kids in Crisis from School to Courts will address inequities in quality of education, rate of school suspensions and more.

The City of Kirkwood faced a tragic night a decade ago, when a gunman went on a shooting rampage at a city hall meeting, leaving six people dead and two others injured. The shooter, Charles Lee "Cookie" Thornton, was a disgruntled resident of Meacham Park, a predominately black neighborhood in Kirkwood.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the issues raised by the shooting at Kirkwood City Hall and how they may have been addressed.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh went Behind the Headlines to discuss the aftermath of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) decision on a partial removal of World War II-era radioactive waste at the West Lake Landfill, in northwest St. Louis County.

Pages