Marilyn Geewax

Marilyn Geewax is a senior editor, assigning and editing business radio stories. She also serves as the national economics correspondent for the NPR web site, and regularly discusses economic issues on NPR's mid-day show Here & Now.

Her work contributed to NPR's 2011 Edward R. Murrow Award for hard news for "The Foreclosure Nightmare." Geewax also worked on the foreclosure-crisis coverage that was recognized with a 2009 Heywood Broun Award.

Before joining NPR in 2008, Geewax served as the national economics correspondent for Cox Newspapers' Washington Bureau. Before that, she worked at Cox's flagship paper, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, first as a business reporter and then as a columnist and editorial board member. She got her start as a business reporter for the Akron Beacon Journal.

Over the years, she has filed news stories from China, Japan, South Africa and Europe. Recently, she headed to Europe to participate in the RIAS German/American Journalist Exchange Program.

Geewax was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard, where she studied economics and international relations. She earned a master's degree at Georgetown University, focusing on international economic affairs, and has a bachelor's degree from The Ohio State University.

She is a member of the National Press Club's Board of Governors and serves on the Global Economic Reporting Initiative Committee for the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

Overtime or comp time? Which one suits you best? Both you and your boss may agree it would be best for you to work a sixth day when a big project is due in March, and then take off for a long weekend in June. No big deal. But under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 , private employers must pay time and a half to workers who put in more than 40 hours on the job in any one week. In most cases, workers are eager to get that overtime pay. But some might want more flexibility about how they get...

The U.S. Congress — a body not exactly known for its swift feet — raced Friday to complete legislation to help travelers avoid delays at airports. The House voted 361-41 to approve legislation that the Senate passed without objection late Thursday. The bill gives the Federal Aviation Administration more spending flexibility to cut its budget while avoiding furloughs of air traffic controllers. President Obama plans to sign the legislation to help quickly end the disruptions tied to thin...

Most U.S. workers fit snugly into the middle class, but they worry a lot about falling out of it, according to a poll released Thursday. After years of watching home prices slide and job creation stall, 6 in 10 Americans say they fear tumbling from the middle class in the next few years, the Allstate-National Journal Heartland Monitor Poll suggests. And the negative sentiment is increasing: Only 29 percent of respondents say the country is headed in the "right direction." Back in November,...

Some air travelers faced delays Monday as furloughs of air traffic controllers began taking effect. The Federal Aviation Administration said that with fewer eyes on the skies, it was forced to delay some flights. Travelers checking the FAA website saw alerts such as: "Due to STAFFING, there is a Traffic Management Program in effect for traffic arriving Charlotte Douglas International Airport, Charlotte, NC (CLT). This is causing some arriving flights to be delayed an average of 22 minutes."...

Many revolutions begin with the sound of explosions and marching boots. Now, another revolution is shaking up the world, and it's moving forward to the beep of alarm clocks and the clack of heels heading out. Legions of women around the world are leaving their homes to join the paid labor force. Worldwide, 4 in 10 paid workers are female; in the coming decade, an estimated 1 billion more women will enter the formal workforce , pushing up economic growth. That's among the most powerful trends...

Still haven't filed your taxes, eh? Well, you have until 11:59 p.m. Monday to get it all done — or at least file for an extension that gets you off the hook until Oct. 15. To help all of you procrastinators, here are answers to a few of your questions. If I'm filing by mail, can I come skidding into the post office at 11:58 p.m. and still make the deadline? Maybe — depending on where you live. Most post office locations will keep regular hours; some will stay open until 7 p.m. or 8 p.m. to...

When President Obama on Wednesday unveils his blueprint for the government's 2014 budget, he'll offer lots of ideas for changes in taxes and spending. But the proposal likely to grab the most attention will be the one dealing with cost-of-living adjustments for Social Security recipients. Many economists would applaud a change in the way Social Security officials measure inflation, but many older Americans may hiss, fearing a new formula will cut their benefits. If Congress were to approve it...

The 11.7 million Americans searching for work got discouraging news Friday morning when the Labor Department said employers created only 88,000 jobs in March. The weak job growth comes at the same time benefits for the long-term unemployed are shrinking. The smaller-than-expected increase in payrolls was a big disappointment, coming after a long stretch of much better results. Over the past year, employment growth has averaged 169,000 jobs a month. Hopes for an improved labor market in 2013...

The millions of Americans who lost factory jobs over the past decade may find this hard to believe, but U.S. manufacturing is coming back to life. The chest compressions are applied by the pumping of cheap, domestic natural gas. "We are entering a new era," says economist Jerry Jasinowski, a former president of the National Association of Manufacturers, a trade group. He and other optimists are cheered by the increase in industrial production, which has grown at a 5 percent annualized rate...

This week, optimists had no trouble finding fresh evidence to suggest that the housing market is recovering. On Thursday, they learned from a Realtors' report that existing home sales hit the highest level in more than 3 years . And earlier this week, a Commerce Department report showed homebuilding permits have been rising at the quickest pace since June 2008. But not everyone is convinced that the sector's momentum has staying power. Skeptics point to reasons why the housing sector might...

Ask Americans to point out Cyprus, and most would have to spin a globe several times before noticing the small island nation, east of Greece and south of Turkey. But whether or not you have ever given a thought to the 1.1 million people living there under the warm Mediterranean sun, Cyprus might send a chill up your spine this week. That's because a Cypriot banking crisis has the potential to disrupt global financial systems, which are still trying to recover from the crisis of 2008-2009....

If you enjoy having a good argument, Friday's report on the labor market gives you plenty to chew over. Find a debate partner and let's get started. First, these are the facts: The Labor Department data showed February was a good period for job creation . During the short, cold month, employers added 236,000 jobs — far more than the 160,000 most economists had been predicting. And the unemployment rate fell from January's 7.9 percent to 7.7 percent — the lowest level since December 2008. OK,...

Getting economists to agree with each other isn't easy. But Congress and the White House have managed to unite them. More than 95 percent of top U.S. economists believe growth is "likely to be negatively affected" by the automatic federal spending cuts that are scheduled to kick in Friday, according to the latest survey by the National Association for Business Economics. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke joined the economists' chorus Tuesday, telling Congress that the spending cuts' harm...

Those baggage fees, cramped seats and tiny pretzel bags to the contrary and notwithstanding, airline passengers enjoyed good times in 2012, according to an annual recap from Airlines for America, the industry trade group. Last year was good because no U.S. commercial airline crashed, nearly 82 percent of flights arrived on time and only about three bags were mishandled for every 1,000 domestic passengers. Back in 2007, only 73.4 percent of flights were on time and seven bags were lost for...

American Airlines and US Airways on Thursday announced they plan to merge to create the country's largest airline, with a route network stretching from coast to coast, and covering large swaths of Latin America, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean and Africa. The merger would knit together American's parent company, Fort Worth, Texas-based AMR Corp., and Tempe, Ariz.-based US Airways Group Inc. to form a new company worth about $11 billion. The combined carrier — with more than 6,700 daily flights...

So maybe the Great Recession really is over. After more than five years of recession and painfully slow recovery, President Obama has sent a powerful signal that he thinks the U.S. economy is now in much better shape — good enough, at least, to provide workers with raises. In his State of the Union address Tuesday night, Obama called upon Congress to boost the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour by 2015, up from the current $7.25. The wage would rise in steps, and after hitting the maximum in...

Business leaders involved in homebuilding, oil drilling or automaking are happy about the way 2013 has kicked off. Lower- and middle-income consumers, on the other hand, are feeling like the year has kicked them in the head. "Consumers have not rebounded with the arrival of the new year," says Ed Farrell, director of consumer insight at the Consumer Reports National Research Center. "Middle-income Americans were particularly hard hit this month and appear to be losing ground." Why, at a time...

Here in the depths of winter, U.S. economic numbers aren't looking so hot. This week, new reports showed growth started to freeze up last fall, and the unemployment rate rose a bit in January, to 7.9 percent. But most economists say you shouldn't let those cold facts fool you: This spring's data could look much brighter if the housing market continues to heat up . A stronger real estate sector typically means increased hiring as companies add carpenters, bricklayers, real estate agents, loan...

If you were dreaming of flying soon in a Boeing 787 Dreamliner, you have to wake up: Federal Aviation Administration isn't rushing its review of the grounded aircraft. "We need to get to the bottom of the recent issues with the batteries in the 787 and ensure their safety before these aircraft can be put back in service," U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said today at an Aero Club luncheon in Washington. The FAA issued an emergency airworthiness directive last week , grounding the...

Maybe you were hoping you'd never hear the phrase "fiscal cliff" again after Congress passed legislation Jan. 1 to address that tax-break-expiration deadline. Sorry. Three more cliff-type deadlines are fast approaching. They involve: 1) raising the federal debt ceiling 2) modifying automatic, across-the-board spending cuts and 3) funding the government to avert a shutdown. The deadlines all hit between Valentine's Day and Easter, which means new rounds of chaotic congressional negotiations...

If you're searching for work in this new year, the Labor Department's final jobs report for 2012 suggests: The trend is your friend in 2013. The jobs outlook is actually "pretty positive," said John Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, an employment consulting firm. Challenger said that, after 34 straight months of job growth, the positive trend is well established and likely to continue. The Labor Department said Friday that in December, employers added 155...

As Americans continue to sort out the contents of the fiscal cliff legislative package passed by Congress Tuesday, they are finding elements they like and some they hate. There's one exception. Everyone is glad Congress finally found a permanent fix for the alternative minimum tax. That one portion of the U.S. tax code — always intended to affect only very wealthy people — had turned itself into a dreaded stalker. The AMT became a constant threat to millions of middle-class taxpayers who...

Suddenly, the new year is looking a bit brighter — at least in the eyes of most economists and investors. On Day 1 of 2013, Congress voted to veer away from the "fiscal cliff" by passing a package of provisions that avoided broad tax hikes and big spending cuts. And on Day 2, stock prices shot up . "There's a lot of relief," said Mark Hopkins, senior economist with Moody's Analytics. "The worst-case scenario has been averted." Yes, there will be new budget battles in February, after President...

After years of recession and slow recovery, maybe you didn't notice. But it turns out, 2012 was a fairly good year for the U.S. economy. The Standard & Poor's 500-stock index has risen nearly 14 percent this year and the unemployment rate has fallen to 7.7 percent, the lowest point in four years. Inflation and interest rates have stayed low, allowing families to cut their debt loads. "Consumers are feeling better now," said Nariman Behravesh, chief economist for IHS Global Insight, a...

(Scroll down for a Tuesday morning update.) On Wall Street, investors appear to be listening closely to the growing talk in Washington about curbing assault weapons. Share prices for gun makers were down when the stock market closed Monday, on an otherwise positive trading day. The S&P 500 Index, a broad measure of stock performance, was up nearly 1.2 percent, but shares of Smith & Wesson Holding Corp. tumbled 5.2 percent, to $8.65. On Friday — the day a gunman shot and killed 20 young...

As weary as many Americans grew of campaign commercials last month, they may be getting even more annoyed this month by endless talk of the fiscal cliff, the massive collection of tax increases and spending cuts set to take effect at year's end. It's easy to understand the urge to stick fingers in ears and loudly chant "la-la-la-la." The budget problems are indeed complicated, and the negotiations tedious. But resolving the mess is extremely important: Without a solution, every person who...

The Labor Department's glad tidings Friday about the uptick in job creation last month might morph into bad news next month for many of the long-term unemployed. That's because the boost in November hiring, with employers adding 146,000 jobs, might make it more difficult for Democrats to argue in favor of having Congress renew the extension of benefits for people out of work more than six months. As things stand, four in 10 Americans who receive unemployment insurance will lose their extended...

It's red alert time for aerospace industry executives, workers and contractors. As they mingled today at the Aerospace Industries Association 's annual Year-End Outlook luncheon at a Washington Grand Hyatt, the bright red electronic digits kept counting down for them. The ever-changing figures on the large digital clock, set up on the ballroom stage, reminded the roughly 300 luncheon participants of the time left before they feel the effects of massive, automatic cuts in government spending ....

For merchants, the stars are lining up — at least so far. Online shopping jumped more than 28 percent on Cyber Monday compared with a year ago, according to IBM Benchmark. And the National Retail Federation says Thanksgiving weekend spending shot up to $59.1 billion, nearly 13 percent more than last year's $52 billion. Fortunately for retailers, those good numbers may keep coming because the heavens have lined up in such a way that the 2012 calendar "is a real plus," says Chris Christopher,...

Seriously, again? Anyone who follows the adventures of the alternative minimum tax has to be getting sick of the many sequels. Again and again, this unpopular income tax threatens to hit middle-class families with large and unexpected tax increases. And each time the threat reappears, Congress applies a "patch" to fix the problem temporarily. That makes the threat an annual event — along with the associated congressional hand-wringing and taxpayer confusion. So here we are again, with the AMT...

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