Marshall Griffin

Statehouse Reporter

Missouri Public Radio State House Reporter Marshall Griffin is a proud alumnus of the University of Mississippi (a.k.a., Ole Miss), and has been in radio for over 20 years, starting out as a deejay. His big break in news came when the first President Bush ordered the invasion of Panama in 1989. Marshall was working the graveyard shift at a rock station, and began ripping news bulletins off the old AP teletype and reading updates between songs. From there on, his radio career turned toward news reporting and anchoring. In 1999, he became the capital bureau chief for Florida's Radio Networks, and in 2003 he became News Director at WFSU-FM/Florida Public Radio. During his time in Tallahassee he covered seven legislative sessions, Governor Jeb Bush's administration, four hurricanes, the Terri Schiavo saga, and the 2000 presidential recount. Before coming to Missouri, he enjoyed a brief stint in the Blue Ridge Mountains, reporting and anchoring for WWNC-AM in Asheville, North Carolina. Marshall lives in Jefferson City with his wife, Julie, their dogs, Max and Mason, and their cat, Honey.

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Budget writers in the Missouri Senate have crafted a proposal designed to preserve funding for blind pensions.

A State House committee began a hearing Tuesday into a stripped-down version of the workplace discrimination bill. 

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Legislation that would require teachers to work more years in a school district before earning tenure has received first-round approval in the Missouri Senate.

david shane / flickr

A State Senate panel spent several hours Wednesday putting together their version of Missouri’s state budget for next year.  But the fate of a program for blind residents is still up in the air.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The Missouri Senate yesterday overrode a veto by Governor Jay Nixon to a measure that would make changes to the state’s workers’ compensation system. But that move will likely have no effect, as there is little chance the House will also override the Governor’s veto.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The Missouri House has reignited intense debate over women’s reproductive rights, passing legislation that would exempt doctors and other health care workers from performing medical procedures that violate their religious beliefs.

The Missouri Senate today overrode a veto by Governor Jay Nixon (D) that would make changes to the state’s workers’ compensation system.

But the likelihood that the House will also override the Governor’s veto is virtually nonexistent, according to Majority Floor Leader Tim Jones (R, Eureka).  He says they just don’t have the votes, even within their own party.

“We would have to first convince our caucus," Jones said.  "And even if we did, we’re still simply three votes short on a bill that no Democrat, I believe, has supported to this point…that’s a tough vote.”

 

Around a hundred demonstrators rallied outside the State Capitol Wednesday to protest plans to induct conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh into the Hall of Famous Missourians. 

Two rallies in Jefferson City today each called for the repeal of the 2010 Affordable Care Act and for employers to have the right to not provide coverage for birth control.

Several hundred people attended the rally held at the State Capitol, led by several religious leaders.  Maggie Karner with the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod told the crowd that President Obama’s birth control mandate is an attack on religious freedom.

“This debate is simply about us being forced to pay for products and services that are contrary to our religious beliefs, and we cannot be expected to check our faith at the door," Karner said.

j.stephenconn / flickr

A St. Louis County State Senator will not seek re-election in the district she currently represents.   Jane Cunningham had initially filed to run for the 7th District seat, even though the new Senate map places that district in the Kansas City area.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

There are less than two months left in this year’s session of the Missouri General Assembly, and House Republicans still haven’t scheduled debate on a wide-ranging public school bill.

Fried Dough / flickr

The latest bill would raise the state’s cigarette tax from 17 cents per pack to a dollar and 9-and-a-half cents per pack.

The Missouri House has passed all 13 bills that make up the state’s budget and sent them to the Senate.  The process took longer than expected, because of the large number of Democrats who took issue with cutting funding to blind pensions and for not spending enough on K-through-12 schools. 

j.stephenconn / flickr

A House committee heard testimony Wednesday on legislation that would abolish the death penalty in Missouri.  As St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin tells us, the bill would also commute sentences of all current Death Row inmates to “life without parole."

j.stephenconn / flickr

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to the state budget for next year.  As St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin tells us, Republican leaders pushed through their plan to restore higher education cuts proposed by Governor Jay Nixon by refusing to fund a program for blind residents.

The Missouri House is debating all 13 bills Tuesday that make up the state’s proposed budget for next year.  Lawmakers are offering up several amendments to the budget – one in particular would have shifted 150-thousand dollars from the state’s biodiesel fund to Alzheimer’s patients.  It was sponsored by Independent House Member Tracy McCreery of St. Louis County.

File / KBIA

House Democrats are backing legislation they say would toughen Missouri’s ethics standards.  As Marshall Griffin tells us from Jefferson City, the bill would restore many provisions recently struck down by the State Supreme Court.

 A lawsuit seeking to block a proposed constitutional amendment regarding voter identification in Missouri was heard today in Jefferson City.

Missouri lawmakers have left Jefferson City for their annual spring break.  House leaders touted their first-half accomplishments while downplaying controversy over Speaker Steven Tilley’s decision to induct Rush Limbaugh into the Hall of Famous Missourians.

Legislation that would add gun owners to the state’s list of protected minority groups has passed the Missouri House. 

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Budget writers in the Missouri House have approved their version of the 13 bills that make up the state's budget for next year.  Committee members eliminated $28 million for a program that aids the blind, but then put 6 million back into it from another source. 

It may be easier to be sentenced to death in Missouri than in other states, according to a study released today.

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Candidates for the Missouri General Assembly, for Governor and for other statewide offices can now file to run.  Hundreds flocked to Jefferson City today and lined up outside the doors of the Secretary of State’s office to file their paperwork.

File / KBIA

The Missouri Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a lawsuit challenging the new State House redistricting map. 

A ten-member commission chosen by Gov. Jay Nixon to draw a new map for Missouri’s State Senate districts has reached a tentative agreement.

File / KBIA

The Missouri Science and Innovation Reinvestment Act, or MOSIRA, has been ruled unconstitutional by a Cole County judge.

File / KBIA

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would require driver’s license exams be given only in English.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Two lawsuits challenging Missouri’s new congressional district map have been heard for a second time by the State Supreme Court. The cases returned to the high court after the map was upheld two weeks ago by a Cole County judge.

File photo / KBIA

The Missouri Senate has unanimously passed legislation to move the filing period for the state’s party primaries back by one month.  The bill is moving rapidly because the filing period is currently set to begin February 28th and end in late March.

File / KBIA

Legislation has been filed in both the Missouri House and Senate to address the state’s Second Injury Fund, which provides payments to workers with prior disabilities who are injured on the job.  But the fund has been losing money for years.

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