Marshall Griffin

Statehouse Reporter

Missouri Public Radio State House Reporter Marshall Griffin is a proud alumnus of the University of Mississippi (a.k.a., Ole Miss), and has been in radio for over 20 years, starting out as a deejay. His big break in news came when the first President Bush ordered the invasion of Panama in 1989. Marshall was working the graveyard shift at a rock station, and began ripping news bulletins off the old AP teletype and reading updates between songs. From there on, his radio career turned toward news reporting and anchoring. In 1999, he became the capital bureau chief for Florida's Radio Networks, and in 2003 he became News Director at WFSU-FM/Florida Public Radio. During his time in Tallahassee he covered seven legislative sessions, Governor Jeb Bush's administration, four hurricanes, the Terri Schiavo saga, and the 2000 presidential recount. Before coming to Missouri, he enjoyed a brief stint in the Blue Ridge Mountains, reporting and anchoring for WWNC-AM in Asheville, North Carolina. Marshall lives in Jefferson City with his wife, Julie, their dogs, Max and Mason, and their cat, Honey.

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There are less than two months left in this year’s session of the Missouri General Assembly, and House Republicans still haven’t scheduled debate on a wide-ranging public school bill.

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The latest bill would raise the state’s cigarette tax from 17 cents per pack to a dollar and 9-and-a-half cents per pack.

The Missouri House has passed all 13 bills that make up the state’s budget and sent them to the Senate.  The process took longer than expected, because of the large number of Democrats who took issue with cutting funding to blind pensions and for not spending enough on K-through-12 schools. 

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A House committee heard testimony Wednesday on legislation that would abolish the death penalty in Missouri.  As St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin tells us, the bill would also commute sentences of all current Death Row inmates to “life without parole."

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The Missouri House has given first-round approval to the state budget for next year.  As St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin tells us, Republican leaders pushed through their plan to restore higher education cuts proposed by Governor Jay Nixon by refusing to fund a program for blind residents.

The Missouri House is debating all 13 bills Tuesday that make up the state’s proposed budget for next year.  Lawmakers are offering up several amendments to the budget – one in particular would have shifted 150-thousand dollars from the state’s biodiesel fund to Alzheimer’s patients.  It was sponsored by Independent House Member Tracy McCreery of St. Louis County.

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House Democrats are backing legislation they say would toughen Missouri’s ethics standards.  As Marshall Griffin tells us from Jefferson City, the bill would restore many provisions recently struck down by the State Supreme Court.

 A lawsuit seeking to block a proposed constitutional amendment regarding voter identification in Missouri was heard today in Jefferson City.

Missouri lawmakers have left Jefferson City for their annual spring break.  House leaders touted their first-half accomplishments while downplaying controversy over Speaker Steven Tilley’s decision to induct Rush Limbaugh into the Hall of Famous Missourians.

Legislation that would add gun owners to the state’s list of protected minority groups has passed the Missouri House. 

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Budget writers in the Missouri House have approved their version of the 13 bills that make up the state's budget for next year.  Committee members eliminated $28 million for a program that aids the blind, but then put 6 million back into it from another source. 

It may be easier to be sentenced to death in Missouri than in other states, according to a study released today.

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Candidates for the Missouri General Assembly, for Governor and for other statewide offices can now file to run.  Hundreds flocked to Jefferson City today and lined up outside the doors of the Secretary of State’s office to file their paperwork.

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The Missouri Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a lawsuit challenging the new State House redistricting map. 

A ten-member commission chosen by Gov. Jay Nixon to draw a new map for Missouri’s State Senate districts has reached a tentative agreement.

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The Missouri Science and Innovation Reinvestment Act, or MOSIRA, has been ruled unconstitutional by a Cole County judge.

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The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would require driver’s license exams be given only in English.

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Two lawsuits challenging Missouri’s new congressional district map have been heard for a second time by the State Supreme Court. The cases returned to the high court after the map was upheld two weeks ago by a Cole County judge.

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The Missouri Senate has unanimously passed legislation to move the filing period for the state’s party primaries back by one month.  The bill is moving rapidly because the filing period is currently set to begin February 28th and end in late March.

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Legislation has been filed in both the Missouri House and Senate to address the state’s Second Injury Fund, which provides payments to workers with prior disabilities who are injured on the job.  But the fund has been losing money for years.

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The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to legislation that would push back the filing period for the state’s August primaries by one month.

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Legislation that would allow employers to block insurance coverage for birth control, abortions and sterilizations, all for religious reasons, has passed a Missouri Senate committee.

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Wide-ranging ethics rules that were passed by Missouri lawmakers two years ago were tossed out Tuesday by the State Supreme Court.

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State and federal leaders are gathering in Columbia tomorrow to talk about ways to prevent last year’s devastating floods in northwest and southeastern Missouri.

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The Missouri House has passed legislation that would require voters to show photo identification at the polls. 

The Thursday vote split exactly along party lines.

Democrats hammered away at Republicans’ arguments that the bill would combat voter fraud, saying there hasn’t been a documented case of voter fraud in decades – and that the bill does nothing to deal with voter registration fraud.  GOP House Member Todd Richardson of Poplar Bluff disagreed.

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The Missouri Senate has passed legislation that would redefine what constitutes discrimination in the workplace. The vote was a mere formality following last week’s battle to kill the bill.

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Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says he want to add $40 million to his higher education budget.  The money would come from a proposed lawsuit settlement with five large mortgage banks over foreclosure practices.

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Debate began Monday in the Missouri House on legislation to require voters to show photo identification at the polls.  As Marshall Griffin tells us from Jefferson City, the back-and-forth got pretty heated at times.

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Two bills that would provide incentives for building underground data storage centers and for drawing amateur sporting events to Missouri have cleared a State House committee.

A Cole County Judge has upheld the new congressional redistricting map passed by Missouri lawmakers last year. 

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