Marshall Griffin

Statehouse Reporter

Missouri Public Radio State House Reporter Marshall Griffin is a proud alumnus of the University of Mississippi (a.k.a., Ole Miss), and has been in radio for over 20 years, starting out as a deejay. His big break in news came when the first President Bush ordered the invasion of Panama in 1989. Marshall was working the graveyard shift at a rock station, and began ripping news bulletins off the old AP teletype and reading updates between songs. From there on, his radio career turned toward news reporting and anchoring. In 1999, he became the capital bureau chief for Florida's Radio Networks, and in 2003 he became News Director at WFSU-FM/Florida Public Radio. During his time in Tallahassee he covered seven legislative sessions, Governor Jeb Bush's administration, four hurricanes, the Terri Schiavo saga, and the 2000 presidential recount. Before coming to Missouri, he enjoyed a brief stint in the Blue Ridge Mountains, reporting and anchoring for WWNC-AM in Asheville, North Carolina. Marshall lives in Jefferson City with his wife, Julie, their dogs, Max and Mason, and their cat, Honey.

Ways To Connect

A spokesman for Governor Jay Nixon said his office is continuing to explore options on how to reopen the Gateway Arch and other National Park Service sites in Missouri.

Nixon’s press secretary, Scott Holste, said in an emailed statement that the Governor’s office has been working with the U-S Department of the Interior on finding the best way to reopen National Park properties.

gateway arch
paparutzi / flickr

Missouri has joined a growing list of states looking to reopen national parks within their borders as the federal government shutdown continues.  

jcarlosn / Flickr

Missouri gas stations will not be selling E-15 anytime soon.

A joint House-Senate committee voted Wednesday to reject a rule change sought by the State Agriculture Department that would have allowed sales of fuel containing 15 percent ethanol. Republican Senator Eric Schmitt of St. Louis County chairs the committee and said its vote had nothing to do with its opinion on increasing ethanol use in Missouri.

Flickr

The federal government shutdown has now hit the Missouri National Guard.

Late Wednesday, the Guard furloughed nearly a thousand of their 1,400 federal technicians considered to be non-essential.  Spokeswoman, Major Tammy Spicer, says the technicians include both civilian and uniformed staff.

"Full-time federal technicians do a variety of jobs across the state, anything from clerical, to mechanical, to aviation related," Spicer said.

Marshall Griffin / St. Louis Public Radio

A joint House-Senate committee heard testimony Tuesday on the effects of Missouri's school transfer law, which allows students from unaccredited K-12 schools to transfer to nearby accredited districts.

The 5 1/2-hour hearing kicked off with Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) Commissioner Chris Nicastro telling the committee of the dire situation facing the state's unaccredited school districts.

A series of hearings by state lawmakers into Missouri's Medicaid system has begun.

Members of a Missouri House interim committee tasked with improving government efficiency complained Wednesday about not having access to the full budgets of any of the state's universities.

The committee was examining the Department of Higher Education.  Republican committee member Kathie Conway of St. Charles says the department's annual budget requests to the Governor's office do not contain line-by-line expense requests she says the committee needs to do its job.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

There could be an effort next year to change the law allowing Missouri lawmakers and others to carry guns at the State Capitol.

Former Missouri House Speaker Catherine Hanaway says she's considering running for Governor in 2016.

Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) blasted President Obama's (D) Affordable Care Act Monday, just over one week before Missouri's federally-run health insurance exchange is scheduled to open for business.

Kinder told reporters during a conference call that he hopes Missouri residents without health coverage will opt not to use the exchange.

The so-called "Famous 15" Missouri Republican House Members who voted "no" on a controversial tax cut bill during last week's veto session are set to meet Friday to plan their next steps.

Schaefer to run for Attorney General

Sep 18, 2013
Kurt Schaefer
File Photo / KBIA

State Senator Kurt Schaefer has become the first big-name Republican to toss his hat in the ring for the 2016 Missouri Attorney General’s race. He is in his second and final term in the Missouri Senate.  

He made headlines earlier this year when he held hearings on the Department of Revenue’s practice of scanning the documents of driver’s license applicants, and its decision to release the names of Missouri’s concealed-carry weapons holders to a federal investigator.  

Marshall Griffin / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri U.S. Congressman Blaine Luetkemeyer (R) is blasting the Obama Administration for the way it's handled the crisis in Syria.

Luetkemeyer spoke Monday before a small group of business leaders in Jefferson City.  He told them that Syrian officials used chemical weapons against their own people because they fear no repercussions from the U.S.

Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has released just over half of the 400 million dollars he withheld earlier this year from Missouri’s current state budget.  215-million dollars will be divvied up among K-through-12 schools, higher education, mental health programs and specific programs for training health care professional in southwest Missouri.  Nixon released the money Thursday after Republican lawmakers on Wednesday failed to override his veto of a controversial tax cut bill.

The showdown between Missouri's Democratic Governor and the Republican-led General Assembly finally arrives this week, as lawmakers return to Jefferson City for their annual veto session.  Governor Jay Nixon struck down 29 bills this year, with most of the post-veto attention falling on two bills in particular, a controversial tax cut proposal and an even more controversial attempt to nullify federal gun control laws.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin takes a look at what may or may not happen on Wednesday.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

Several police departments and organizations around Missouri are speaking out against a bill that would bar enforcement of federal gun laws if they interfere with a Missourian's Second Amendment rights.

St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch says House Bill 436 would in effect end cooperation between local and federal law enforcement agencies.  He cites a recent traffic stop where his officers apprehended two armed men wanted for different crimes.

A report released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) shows the number of Missouri households threatened by hunger has grown over the past three years.

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is siding with fellow Democrat, Governor Jay Nixon, in opposition to legislation that would challenge the federal government's ability to enforce federal gun laws in Show-Me State.

Drought conditions are again plaguing the northern half of Missouri, according to the latest U.S. drought monitor report.

So far, there has not been a ground swell of support for the idea of a special legislative session in Missouri to pass an alternate version of the tax cut bill vetoed earlier this year by Governor Jay Nixon (D).

Noahudlis / Wikimedia Commons

The American Civil Liberties Union hopes to block two executions in Missouri this fall by seeking to disqualify the anesthesiologist used by the Department of Corrections.

Jeffrey Mittman is Executive Director of the ACLU of Eastern Missouri.  He says the American Board of Anesthesiology has recently adopted the same standards used by the American Medical Association, meaning that they cannot participate in ending someone's life.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Roughly 200 people braved the heat and humidity outside Missouri’s Capitol building today (Wednesday) to mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.  Among those speaking at the event was former St. Louis lawmaker Jeanette Mott Oxford, who now heads the Missouri Association for Social Welfare.  She told the crowd she believes King’s vision for America went beyond racial equality:

Dozens of new state laws take effect in Missouri on Wednesday.  

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

A Missouri House interim committee tasked with looking at how efficiently state government operates spent Monday scrutinizing the Department of Social Services.

While Governor Jay Nixon (D) continues touring Missouri to oppose efforts to override his veto of tax cut legislation, a group of business officials and political activists are trying to rally support for the override effort.

The Missouri State Board of Education voted Tuesday to increase oversight of the state's unaccredited school districts.

After a controversial inductee last year, Missouri residents are being given the chance this year to nominate two of the next three inductees for the Hall of Famous Missourians.

House Speaker Tim Jones (R, Eureka) says he made the decision to seek citizens' input, in part, to see if someone who's worthy of induction has been forgotten over time or overlooked.

It's been twenty years since the Great Flood of '93 swelled the Missouri River to record-high crests.  Since then, levees have been upgraded, flood preparations improved, and in a few places, communities bought out and relocated.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin visited some sites along the river in central Missouri and talked to people who battled the flood waters in 1993, and who still keep an eye on the river today:

Flooding damages north Jefferson City & triggers buyout of Cedar City

A special Missouri House committee appointed to look into why the Department of Revenue began scanning documents of driver's license and conceal-carry applicants has wrapped up its series of hearings this summer.

Missouri Division of Tourism / Flickr

Attendance figures appear to be on the rise as the 2013 Missouri State Fair heads into its final weekend. 

Pages