Meredith Turk

Student Newscaster

Meredith is a graduate student reporter at KBIA.  At University of Missouri she is focusing on radio broadcast, multimedia production and investigative reporting.  Meredith has a degree in Anthropology from Northwestern University.  

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Meredith Turk / KBIA

 

Deep in the heart of the Ozark Mountains in southern Missouri a battles rages over the use of a National Park: The Ozark National Scenic Riverways. This national park is visited by millions each year and was the first federally protected river system, established in 1964.

Paul Sableman/flickr

The issue of abortion in Missouri seems like old news. But it's an issue that remains very much at the forefront of Missouri politics this year.  In this year's legislative session, there are over thirty pieces of legislation touching the issue.

Abortion wait times interactive map
Andrew Gibson, KBIA-FM

In March, the Missouri House approved a bill that would extend the state's abortion waiting time to 72 hours from 24 hours. If the measure, HB 1307, becomes law, it would put Missouri in company with South Dakota and Utah as the only states with a 72-hour waiting period.

 

Proponents of the bill, argue 72 hours is not too much to wait to receive such a procedure.

“I don’t think 72 hours, 3 days is too much time to bring another life into this world or not," said Tim Jones, Missouri  Republican Speaker of the House. Elizabeth Nash, State Issues Manager at the Guttmacher Institute, said it is too much to ask.  

Missouri has just one abortion service provider in St. Louis after Planned Parenthood of Mid-Missouri lost their doctor, who could perform abortions, in 2011. Having just one location where women may receive abortion care, Nash argues the 72-hour wait time would exacerbate the logistical burden on women who need to travel for abortion services, such as travel, day care, housing and taking off work.

"It is probably not going to sway a woman or affect her decision-making, but it can impact her ability to access abortion care entirely," said Nash. 

  

Meredith Turk / KBIA

Deep in the heart of the Ozark Mountains in southern Missouri a battles rages over the use of a National Park, The Ozark National Scenic Riverways. This National Park is visited by millions each year and was the first federally protected river system, established in 1964.

StoryCorps

Sam Jonesi is a cadet in the Air Force ROTC at University of Missouri.   He’s a computer science student and hopes to use his training to help the military in cyber warfare.  He came to Story Corps with his friend Lakshna Mehta to talk about his hopes and motivations for his military life.

This story was produced by Meredith Turk for KBIA. Music by Chris Zabriskie

 

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Gov. Nixon signs random assortment of eight bills into law
  • Audit questions Missouri State Highway Patrol's purchase of new airplane
  • 885 positions to be cut at Fort Leonard Wood, but not as bad as expected

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon vetoed the "paycheck protection" bill Tuesday, but he also signed legislation covering a broad range of issues.  The bills and a short description are summarized in a news release on Governor Nixon's website:

The Pennsylvania State University

University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe appointed Henry Foley as the system’s new vice president of academic affairs today.  

Regional news from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

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  • State audit finds waste in child-care provider program