Michaela Tucker

Health Reporter

Michaela Tucker is a Minneapolis native currently studying broadcast journalism at the University of Missouri. She is also a co-founder of KBIA’s partner program Making Waves, a youth radio initiative that empowers Columbia Public Schools students to share their stories.

Yance Ford

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

When an unarmed black man is killed, who has the right to tell his story?

 

That's the question filmmaker Yance Ford wrestles with for much of Strong Island, a film ten years in the making. The film centers around Ford's older brother William. William was shot to death while confronting a man in an auto repair shop in 1992. Though William was unarmed at the time, his killer was never put to trial.

 

 


This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Meteorites flying through the sky, bear cubs running down the highway, trucks exploding in flames just feet away from other drivers - all of these scenes have been caught on the dash cam footage of cars throughout Russia and the former Soviet Union. Drivers often post those videos to YouTube, creating viral videos that are viewed around the world.

 

 

 


Florent Vassault

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Lindy Lou, Juror Number 2 follows one woman as she struggles to come to terms with the decision she and her fellow jurors made twenty years ago sentencing Bobby Wilcher to death. When Wilcher was executed in 2006, Lindy had been his only visitor.

 

Theo Anthony

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Some people might be disgusted to find a rat stuck in their trash can, but when filmmaker Theo Anthony came home one night, he saw it as way to tell a story.

 


 

Petra Lataster-Czich and Peter Lataster

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Directors Petra Lataster-Czich and Peter Lataster started out making Miss Kiet’s Children with the intention of creating a love letter to education as a profession. When they found their film’s subject, the stern yet compassionate primary school teacher Kiet Engels, they realized they were making a much different film than they planned.

 


This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Raoul Peck read about James Baldwin for the first time in high school. He became enraptured with the view of the world through the lens of Baldwin. Throughout his life and his career as a filmmaker, he carried this view, which crept up now and then in the projects he began to work on. His passion for the social activist’s work acted as the inspiration for the creation of the film, I’m Not Your Negro.

 

 


 

Viktor Jakovleski

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

In 2012, a Berlin-based artist described to Viktor Jakovleski a new world he had entered when he visited the city of Tultapec, north of Mexico City. He described in great detail a fireworks festival that was a “super psychedelic experience”. Jakovleski, enraptured with the story, decided to a do a little research on his own about this celebration. Five years later, Jakovleski made the film, Brimstone and Glory, based off his visits to the festival.

 


 

Steve James

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Abacus Federal Savings of Chinatown, New York was the only U.S. bank to face criminal charges after the 2008 financial crisis. The Sungs are forced to defend the legacy of their family throughout a five year legal battle.

 

Laura Checkoway

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

Edith + Eddie tells the love story of America’s oldest interracial newlyweds. Edith, 96, and Eddie, 95, are avid dancers and pillars in their community church.

 

Travis Wilkerson

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

The idea for Travis Wilkerson’s film Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun? started among the whispers and legend of his family’s secrets.  

 


Sompot Chidgasornpongse

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

As the train bursts past dense forests and slows through quiet villages, Railway Sleepers by director Sompot Chidgasornpongse takes its audience on a journey through Thailand. Shot entirely on a train over the space of several years, the film brings its audience on board and offers a glimpse into the lives and conversations of its passengers.

 


Claire Simon

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest.

 

French director Claire Simon is set to receive the True Vision Award at this year’s True/False festival. The award will honor Simon’s 30-year career and, along with her latest release Graduations, the festival will be showing a collection of the director’s work.

 


Kip Kendrick / Twitter

Missouri Representative Kip Kendrick and six other House Democrats filed seven ethics reform bills last week. The proposed legislation includes creating new term limits, banning gifts from lobbyists and regulating campaign committees. KBIA’s Michaela Tucker spoke with Kendrick about the bills and the upcoming legislative session.

 


 

Courtesy of Beth Synder

Beth Snyder turned her hobby of printmaking into a career when she started 1canoe2, a print and illustration studio. Her passion for creating prints began when her husband, then-fiancé, bought her a press for about $700 on eBay, for Christmas in 2007. She had wanted to print her wedding invitations using a traditional method.

 


Becca Costello / Indiana Public Media

Senior Airman Drew Forster joined the military as a way to pay for college. He returned from active duty in 2014 and says his time in the Air Force taught him skills he still uses today, like resilience, working under pressure — and something a little unexpected.

 


Michaela Tucker
KBIA

“This is crazy.”

The words of 10-year-old Elena Hoffman seemed to echo the sentiment of many of the partygoers at Ragtag Cinema’s election night watch party on November 8.

The party, which was billed as a bi-partisan gathering, drew mostly Clinton-supporters. Attendees could spend their evening waiting for results at either the bar, the large theater that aired CNN coverage or the small theater that aired the PBS telecast.

Tracy Lane, the executive director of Ragtag, estimated that nearly 200 people were in attendance by 8 p.m.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Five of the six biggest companies that produce and sell seeds and chemicals to the world’s farmers are pursuing deals that could leave a market dominated by just three giant, global companies. They say getting bigger means bringing more sophisticated and innovative solutions to farmers faster, but opponents say consolidation has irreversible downsides.

 


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

The University of Missouri System announced Wednesday its next president will be Mun Y. Choi, current provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of Connecticut. The announcement was made at an event in Jefferson City. According to a release from the University of Missouri System, Choi will begin work on March 1, 2017.

Pamela Henrickson, the chair of the Board of Curators, introduced Choi. She called him a “superb leader,” and praised his commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

The massive industry that supplies farmers with the tools to raise crops is on the brink of a watershed moment. High-profile deals that would see some of the largest global agri-chemical companies combine are in the works and could have ripple effects from farm fields to dinner tables across the globe.

 

Frank Morris / Harvest Public Media

Like most farmers, Mark Nelson, who grows corn, soybeans and wheat near Louisburg, Kan., is getting squeezed. He's paying three times more for seed than he used to, while his corn sells for less than half what it brought four years ago.

 

"It's a – that's a challenge," Nelson says. "You're not going to be in the black, let's put it that way."

Maria Jose Valero / Missouri Business Alert

After a decade of planning and development, the Katy Trail extension towards Kansas City is set to open. A portion of the trail will be open to the public this October and it’s news not only for cyclists, but also for business owners. The Missouri  State Parks Department says the Katy Trail supports 367 jobs and generates about $18.5 million in economic impact a year, which could grow.

 

This week is the first Bringing Up Business Week in Columbia. It’s an opportunity for entrepreneurs to pitch new ideas, learn business skills and network with each other.

 

KBIA’s Michaela Tucker talked with Steve Wyatt, the Vice Provost of Economic Development at the University and an organizer of the week, about how the university is engaging with the entrepreneurial community in Mid-Missouri.

 

Caleb Rowden
File Photo / KBIA

  Republican State Representative Caleb Rowden is serving a second term in the Missouri House for District 44 and is running for the state senate seat in District 19, previously held by State Senator Kurt Schaefer. Rowden’s platform focuses on economic development, low taxes, government accountability and strengthening Missouri’s public education system.

The University of Missouri and public K-12 education serve as the centerpiece of Rowden’s campaign.

Rich Egger / Harvest Public Media

Sandy Songer of Broken Bow, Oklahoma, has a bit of advice for anyone who wants to watch chainsaw artists in action.

“If you’re going to stay around us very long, you need to put some earplugs in,” she says with a laugh, as chainsaws revved and roared behind her like race cars, drowning out everything else in the background.

From carnival barkers, to Ferris wheels humming, to snorts and moos of livestock shows, late-summer state and county fairs are noisy, chaotic affairs. Add to the din this season: chainsaws buzzing.

 

Twiiter

In a recent study, University of Missouri researchers developed new techniques to make scientific research studies more accessible to lawmakers through social media like Twitter.

MU professor Julie Kapp worked on the study and she said very little scientific research is shared via Twitter even though 95 percent of congressional health policymakers are users.

"It doesn't seem like there's a lot of science being shared broadly and that some of that science, obviously, would be very helpful to inform policy decisions," Kapp said.

Gistory

More and more companies, especially in the media, are trying to find new ways to attract millennials. And one former University of Missouri student is going directly to the source with her new journalism tech start-up, run by and for millennials.

Christopher Hawkins / Flickr

You've probably heard infants babbling strings of syllables before they start using words, but have you ever wondered why?

University of Missouri researcher Mary Fagan examined that question in a recent study by comparing speech development in babies with normal hearing, babies with profound hearing loss and babies with cochlear implants-a surgically implanted device that can help the deaf hear.


Jonathan Steffens / Flickr

MU Professor James Mann recently completed research that sheds more light on what we know about football injuries.  The data was collected from the 2011 Missouri Tigers football team and reveals a new correlation between academic stress and football injuries.


Missouri Office of the Attorney General

  Americans are living longer, and in most cases, that comes with more healthcare costs, especially at the end of life. In a study this year, researchers at the University of Missouri found more Americans are preparing for the end of life through conversations and legal documents, and are reducing health care costs along the way.


Mike Tobias / Harvest Public Media

The population of monarch butterflies has declined so dramatically in recent years that the iconic insect is being considered for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s endangered species list. In Nebraska and across the other areas of the Midwest, a stop on the monarch migration route, efforts are underway to determine the scope of the decline.

 


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