Sara Shahriari

Assistant News Director, Assistant Professor

Sara Shahriari is the assistant news director at KBIA-FM, and she holds a master's degree from the Missouri School of Journalism. Sara hosts and is executive producer of the PRNDI award-winning weekly public affairs talk show Intersection. She also works with many of KBIA’s talented student reporters and teaches an advanced radio reporting lab. She previously worked as a freelance journalist in Bolivia for six years, where she contributed print, radio and multimedia stories to outlets including Al Jazeera America, Bloomberg News, the Guardian, the Christian Science Monitor, Deutsche Welle and Indian Country Today. Sara’s work has focused on mental health, civic issues, women’s and children’s rights, policies affecting indigenous peoples and their lands and the environment. While earning her MA at the Missouri School of Journalism, Sara produced the weekly Spanish-language radio show Radio Adelante. Her work with the KBIA team has been recognized with awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and PRNDI, among others, and she is a two-time recipient of funding from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Ways to Connect

Beatriz Costa-Lima

 This week we’re talking about a project called My Life My Town, which documents the lives of young people living in rural Missouri. It started back in 2011, when Columbia Missourian photo desk  and KBIA staff decided to work together to help students tell stories through images and sound. This past school year new teams of photographers and radio reporters went out to follow up with some of the people who participated in that project and to document the lives of  more young people living in small towns. 

KBIA

This week, we’re talking about homelessness in Columbia with guests Randy Cole, who is the housing program supervisor with the City of Columbia, and Katie Burnham Wilkins, who is the homeless program coordinator at the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital here in Columbia.  Homelessness has been on the rise in Columbia in recent years, so we’re talking about what the city and other organizations are doing to get people housed. This will be a two-part series, and the second show will air May 23.


Micah Walker

  This week on Intersection, we take a look at the Missouri Department of Conservation's efforts to reintroduce elk into Missouri, and we discuss the poaching of a bull elk in December. Our guests this week are resource scientist for the MU Department of Conservation Barbara Keller, State Wildlife Veterinarian for the MDC Kelly Straka, MDC agent Brad Hadley and elk program manager for the MDC David Hasenbeck . Listen to the full story or check out clips from selected interviews below.

Listen to the full story.


KBIA

Past graduates of the Missouri School of Journalism came together to talk with students, other journalists and aspiring writers about the process of writing during the first ever “Words Matter Writing Conference.” The conference took place from April 11 to April 15 and featured topics from magazine writing to freelance journalism.

The speakers at this conference recently had their stories published in Words Matter: Writing to Make a Difference, an anthology consisting of journalistic pieces and memoirs all from graduates of the Missouri School of Journalism. Mary Kay Blakely, one of the two editors of the book along with Amanda Dahling, got the idea for the anthology after she kept receiving pieces of writing from former students.

    

 This week on Intersection, we’re talking about a book called Words Matter: Writing to Make a Difference, which is published by the University of Missouri press. It’s an anthology of journalism and essays written by Mizzou grads, mostly from the journalism school. There are also a bunch of presentations going on this week, where students and members of the public can talk with writers about – what else – writing. There’s information about those sessions at the Words Matter website.

Today on our show we’ll talk with magazine journalist, professor emerita and an editor of this book Mary Kay Blakely about how and why she took on this monumental task. We’ll also talk with Lois Raimondo and Shane Epping, two extraordinary journalists who contributed their writing, and with student Ginger Hervey, who has been working on this collection since her freshman year.

Listen to the full show: 


  Graduate students who work at Mizzou will vote on whether or not to unionize. The election will be Monday, April 18 and Tuesday, April 19. That’s according to an email released to graduated students today by Graduate Professional Counsel Director of Communications Matt McCune.

In an email also released today, Interim MU Chancellor Hank Foley said the announcement came as a surprise to the administration.

McCune says that the university has long been aware an election would occur, if not precisely when, and this was communicated by a number of graduate student groups.

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

  Brian Treece was elected Columbia's new mayor in the April 5 municipal election. As part of our election coverage, Intersection brings you a longer sample of our interview with Treece last week, and an election roundup from the region. 


KBIA

 This week we are talking about the April 5 Columbia municipal election with mayoral candidates Brian Treece and Skip Walther, and Columbia Missourian Public Life editor Scott Swafford . Listen to our entire show to learn more, or read portions of our interviews below.

Regional coverage from the KBIA Newsroom.


Ryan Famuliner, Nathan Lawrence

Last November MU was rocked by protests led by African American student group Concerned Student 1950. The group of 11 students captured campus attention with its message that university administrators were not doing enough to address racism on campus.

KBIA

  On this week's Intersection, we are talking about autism spectrum disorder and the Autism Mentor Program at MU. Our guests are UM student Chris Brown and licensed psychologist and creator of the Autism Mentor Program Colton Miller. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below.


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Michael Shannon Michael Shannon John is the story of children trying to discover who there father really was. Intersection talked with Michael Shannon Michael Shannon John director Chelsea McMullen about the film after it showed at the 2016 True/False Film Fest.

 

Columns at University of Missouri
File Photo / KBIA

COLUMBIA - University leaders are projecting “a very significant budget shortfall” at MU, according to a statement emailed to MU faculty and staff today.

In the statement, Interim MU Chancellor Hank Foley says that factors including an anticipated drop in first-time students and student retention for fall of 2016 could cause a roughly 1,500 student decline in enrollment at MU. That decline would contribute to the $32 million budget gap projected for next year.

 

Intersection's host, Sara Shahriari, spoke with Manu Gerosa, the director of "Between Sisters," a film about Italian sisters and their struggle to share a long-held secret. The documentary is about Gerosa's aunt and mother, and showed to full houses during the True/False Film Fest.


Jason Pratt / flickr

Expectant parents might considering hiring a doula to assist with the childbirth process, but to many, the role doulas play in that process remains a mystery. To learn more about doulas's work, KBIA's Sara Shahriari spoke with local doula and student midwife Sabrina Bias – who became interested in the profession after hiring a doula and midwife to assist with one of her own births. 


Courtesy of The State Historical Society of Missouri

  This week we're exploring African American history in Missouri, with a special emphasis on Columbia. Our guests are University of Missouri-Kansas City professor and historian Diane Mutti Burke, and MU doctoral student in history Mary Beth Brown. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below. 

Listen to the entire show.

As recently as the late 1950s, downtown Columbia looked very different. Here MU doctoral student in history Mary Beth Brown talks about the former African American neighborhood of Cemetery Hill, which was torn down to make way for parking lots and businesses.


A photo of Simon Tatum's drawing
Simon Tatum

This week we're talking with MU student artists. These young people create with paint and fabric and even barbed wire. And for them making art is really serious work and as well as a passion. We learned about our guests through the University's Undergraduate Visual Art and Design Showcase, which took place for the first time on campus in January. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below. 

Listen to the entire show.


Last November, the University of Missouri was rocked by protests led by black student group Concerned Student 1950. The group of 11 students captured campus attention with its message that university administrators were not doing enough to address racism on campus.

a photo of a low intervention delivery suite
MU Women's and Children's Hospital

  

This week we’re talking about the new low intervention delivery suites at the University of Missouri Women's and Children's Hospital. Our guests are mother Jill Markijohn, who was the first person to use the suites when they opened in November, Doctor Courtney Barnes, the medical director of the low intervention birth program, and certified nurse midwife Lori Anderson who works at Women’s and Children’s Hospital.  To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below.

Listen to the entire show. 


  This week on Intersection, we're talking with two local legislators about  major issues at play in the Missouri General Assembly's 2016 session.Our guests are District 45 Democratic Rep. Kip Kendrick, and District 44 Republican Rep. Caleb Rowden. Our conversations with Kendrick and Rowden touch on issues including ethics reform,  healthcare, highways, UM funding and college loan debt. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and  listen to portions of our interviews after the jump.


missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. On this week's Talking Politics, KBIA’s Sara Shahriari speaks with Missouri Senate President Pro Tem, Ron Richard, and got his take on some of the Missouri legislature’s most pressing issues. 

Eight hundred and fifty three people died in Missouri traffic crashes in 2015, according to the Missouri Department of Transportation (MODOT). That’s an 11.4 percent increase compared with 2014, and the highest number of fatalities on Missouri roadways since 2009, MODOT reported today.

Sixty-three percent of the drivers and passengers killed were not wearing seatbelts. According to the Missouri Highway Patrol, the leading causes of fatal crashes continue to be speeding, driver inattention and impaired driving.

MODOT

 

 Two lanes of northbound Interstate 55 will reopen to traffic by 5:30 p.m. December 31 at the Meramec River, mile marker 193, while all southbound lanes will remain closed with water over the highway, according to  the Missouri Department of Transportation. MODOT announced in a press release today that the southbound lanes have high levels of water covering the road and at this time there is no estimate on when that water will recede so the southbound lanes can open.

This week on Intersection, we’re continuing the conversation about diversity and inclusivity at the University of Missouri. This is the second in a two-part series, and we start with Diversity Peer Educator and Coordinator Rivu Dasgupta. We’re also talking with Alanna Diggs, who is co-chair of Four Front, a council for minoritized student groups and student voices. She's also a diversity peer educator. Here's a sample of our conversation with Rivu. To hear the whole show, click the arrow.


Today on Intersection, we’re talking about diversity and inclusivity at the University of Missouri with UM System Interim President Mike Middleton. We’re also talking with Angela Speck, who is a professor of physics and astronomy, director of the astronomy program and chair of the faculty council diversity enhancement committee at MU. This is a special two-part show, and next week we will continue the conversation on diversity and inclusivity with students.


lipcan3/Flickr

 This week on Intersection, the focus is on meat. We're talking about shifts in meat consumption and why they happen, meat production right here in Missouri, and consumer interest in grass-fed beef and sustainable agriculture. This week's guests are KBIA and Harvest Public Media reporter Kristofor Husted, MU professor of rural sociology Mary Hendrickson, and author and rancher Nicolette Hahn Niman, whose most recent book is "Defending Beef, the Case for Sustainable Meat Production."


Sally Hunter/Flickr

  On this week's Intersection, the focus is on women and film. Did you know that just a small percentage of the movies you see in theaters are directed by women? Today on Intersection, we’re talking about why with Kerri Yost, the Director of Programming for the Citizen Jane Film Festival, which comes to Columbia each year to highlight movies directed by women. We also talk with director Mo Scarpelli, an MU grad whose film Frame by Frame was shown at this year’s festival in October. 

Today, Mike Middleton was named University of Missouri System Interim President. Early last year,  Middleton, then MU deputy chancellor, sat down with KBIA's Intersection for a discussion of civil rights history at the university. 

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