Sara Shahriari

Assistant News Director

Sara Shahriari is the assistant news director at KBIA-FM, and she holds a master's degree from the Missouri School of Journalism. Sara hosts and is executive producer of the PRNDI award-winning weekly public affairs talk show Intersection. She also works with many of KBIA’s talented student reporters and teaches an advanced radio reporting lab. She previously worked as a freelance journalist in Bolivia for six years, where she contributed print, radio and multimedia stories to outlets including Al Jazeera America, Bloomberg News, the Guardian, the Christian Science Monitor, Deutsche Welle and Indian Country Today. Sara’s work has focused on mental health, civic issues, women’s and children’s rights, policies affecting indigenous peoples and their lands and the environment. While earning her MA at the Missouri School of Journalism, Sara produced the weekly Spanish-language radio show Radio Adelante. Her work with the KBIA team has been recognized with awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and PRNDI, among others, and she is a two-time recipient of funding from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Ways to Connect

a photo of a low intervention delivery suite
MU Women's and Children's Hospital

  

This week we’re talking about the new low intervention delivery suites at the University of Missouri Women's and Children's Hospital. Our guests are mother Jill Markijohn, who was the first person to use the suites when they opened in November, Doctor Courtney Barnes, the medical director of the low intervention birth program, and certified nurse midwife Lori Anderson who works at Women’s and Children’s Hospital.  To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below.

Listen to the entire show. 


  This week on Intersection, we're talking with two local legislators about  major issues at play in the Missouri General Assembly's 2016 session.Our guests are District 45 Democratic Rep. Kip Kendrick, and District 44 Republican Rep. Caleb Rowden. Our conversations with Kendrick and Rowden touch on issues including ethics reform,  healthcare, highways, UM funding and college loan debt. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and  listen to portions of our interviews after the jump.


missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. On this week's Talking Politics, KBIA’s Sara Shahriari speaks with Missouri Senate President Pro Tem, Ron Richard, and got his take on some of the Missouri legislature’s most pressing issues. 

Eight hundred and fifty three people died in Missouri traffic crashes in 2015, according to the Missouri Department of Transportation (MODOT). That’s an 11.4 percent increase compared with 2014, and the highest number of fatalities on Missouri roadways since 2009, MODOT reported today.

Sixty-three percent of the drivers and passengers killed were not wearing seatbelts. According to the Missouri Highway Patrol, the leading causes of fatal crashes continue to be speeding, driver inattention and impaired driving.

MODOT

 

 Two lanes of northbound Interstate 55 will reopen to traffic by 5:30 p.m. December 31 at the Meramec River, mile marker 193, while all southbound lanes will remain closed with water over the highway, according to  the Missouri Department of Transportation. MODOT announced in a press release today that the southbound lanes have high levels of water covering the road and at this time there is no estimate on when that water will recede so the southbound lanes can open.

This week on Intersection, we’re continuing the conversation about diversity and inclusivity at the University of Missouri. This is the second in a two-part series, and we start with Diversity Peer Educator and Coordinator Rivu Dasgupta. We’re also talking with Alanna Diggs, who is co-chair of Four Front, a council for minoritized student groups and student voices. She's also a diversity peer educator. Here's a sample of our conversation with Rivu. To hear the whole show, click the arrow.


Today on Intersection, we’re talking about diversity and inclusivity at the University of Missouri with UM System Interim President Mike Middleton. We’re also talking with Angela Speck, who is a professor of physics and astronomy, director of the astronomy program and chair of the faculty council diversity enhancement committee at MU. This is a special two-part show, and next week we will continue the conversation on diversity and inclusivity with students.


lipcan3/Flickr

 This week on Intersection, the focus is on meat. We're talking about shifts in meat consumption and why they happen, meat production right here in Missouri, and consumer interest in grass-fed beef and sustainable agriculture. This week's guests are KBIA and Harvest Public Media reporter Kristofor Husted, MU professor of rural sociology Mary Hendrickson, and author and rancher Nicolette Hahn Niman, whose most recent book is "Defending Beef, the Case for Sustainable Meat Production."


Sally Hunter/Flickr

  On this week's Intersection, the focus is on women and film. Did you know that just a small percentage of the movies you see in theaters are directed by women? Today on Intersection, we’re talking about why with Kerri Yost, the Director of Programming for the Citizen Jane Film Festival, which comes to Columbia each year to highlight movies directed by women. We also talk with director Mo Scarpelli, an MU grad whose film Frame by Frame was shown at this year’s festival in October. 

Today, Mike Middleton was named University of Missouri System Interim President. Early last year,  Middleton, then MU deputy chancellor, sat down with KBIA's Intersection for a discussion of civil rights history at the university. 

  University of Missouri leadership released a mass campus email Wednesday afternoon stating in part “Our campus has experienced significant turbulence, and many within our community have suffered threats against their lives and humanity. These threats are reprehensible. “

In a separate statement to media, leadership added that currently, there are no threats to campus safety, and that MUalert.missouri.edu is the only campus source for emergency information.

Bram Sable-Smith/KBIA

University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe resigned Monday, a major move in a school year defined by a level of activism and student mobilization that is not often seen at Mizzou. Later the same day MU Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he is stepping down from his position, and transferring to a research focused role.

Every story is a long story with a deep history and many layers, but this chapter began on October 10. A group of 11 African American students calling themselves Concerned Student 1950 blocked the homecoming parade, linking arms and forming a line in front of Wolfe’s car. They were protesting racism and discrimination at the university. 

Over the course of the next month protests, walkouts and a hunger strike dominated campus news. On Monday, as major changes were underway, Intersection reporters fanned out across campus to bring you these voices and stories from people including Michael Sam, Jonathan Butler, Tim Wolfe and Mary Ratliff, among many others.  


Sara Shahriari/KBIA

On this week's Intersection, we're touring the University of Missouri Museum of Art and Archaeology at Mizzou North with museum Director Alex Barker. We also visit Stephens College's Reel to Real exhibit, which is on display through December 13. Join host Sara Shahriari and reporter Guimel Sibingo as they explore these two venues. 


KBIA

 This week on Intersection, we're talking about graduate students at the University of Missouri here in Columbia. So what’s going on in this part of the university world? That’s what we’re exploring today with our guests, who are Kristofferson Culmer of the Forum on Graduate Rights, Rebecca Smith of KBIA’s Health and Wealth Desk, Matt McCune of the Graduate Professional Council, Professor Earnest Perry of the Missouri School of Journalism and Eric Scott of the Coalition of Graduate Workers.


Here Say: Your Stories about Humor, Told Downtown

Oct 20, 2015
Mariah Escarcega
Emma Nicholas and Rebecca Greenway / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from last season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.

Sara Shahriari / KBIA

On this week's Intersection, the focus is on native plants and our environment – with a special emphasis on the relationship between milkweed and monarch butterflies. Host Sara Shahriari explores efforts to preserve and create native plant habitats in our own backyards, and beyond. Our guests are Chip Taylor of Monarch Watch, Carol Davit of the Missouri Prairie Foundation, Pete Millier of the Mizzou Botanic Garden and Mervin Wallace of Missouri Wildflowers Nursery. 


Kara Tabor/KBIA

 In this week's show, our host Sara Shahriari explores the complicated situation around  access to affordable dental care in Missouri. Featured guests include Gary Harbison, executive director for the Missouri Coalition for Oral Health. Here is a sample of their conversation. 

Q&A: The Dental Care Landscape in Missouri


Steve Judasack
Sarah Kellogg / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from last season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.


Sara Shahriari/KBIA

On this week’s edition of Intersection, we delve into the rich history, sweet sounds and savory flavors of the Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival. Our host Sara Shariari talks with Aarik Danielsen, features editor of the Columbia Daily Tribune, and learns about the stories behind the blues with musicians Pat 'Mother Blues' Cohen, Albert White, Big Ron Hunter, Ardie Dean, Lil' Joe Burton and Nashid Abdul, who perform with the Music Maker Blues Revue. Segments on some of the event’s food vendors and  festival-goers round out the show. 


KBIA

KBIA’s flagship program Intersection returns today with the first episode of the fall 2015 season. Today our host Sara Shahriari  looks at the anxiety epidemic taking place on college campuses around the country, what it feels like to struggle with anxiety, and resources available to students on the MU campus. Featured guests include reporter Guimel Sibingo, student Sarah Bess and Dr. Colton Miller, a licensed psychologist with the MU Student Health Center. Listen to the show for more.


Kenneth Garr
Samantha Kummerer / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from last season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.

   

Emma Nicholas / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from last season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.


Martin LeBar / Flickr

 

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Those royally beautiful creatures, monarch butterflies, are declining in numbers, partly because a certain weed is disappearing, especially across the American Midwest. The monarch butterfly caterpillar depends on milkweed to survive. And that's something you can help with by planting milkweed, which is really a pretty flower in your garden. I know. I have lots of milkweed in mine and lots of monarchs. From member station KBIA, Sara Shahriari has more.

Kristofor Husted/KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from last season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.

 

 


Update: The library reopened Saturday morning. 

The Daniel Boone Regional Library remained closed on Friday.  A statement on the library's website informed the public that an exterminator is applying "a third treatment of different chemicals to eradicate fleas."

The exterminator and library staff will evaluate the situation on Saturday morning to determine if the library can reopen. The library first closed Wednesday.

Sara Shahriari/KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning and more. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map. And to hear your favorite stories from last season, you can find our free podcast on itunes.


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

More than 1,700 people waited in line for hours to get free dental care at a clinic in Columbia, Mo. this month. The turnout for this clinic, called the Missouri Mission of Mercy, reveals a hidden crisis: the expense of dental care and lack of access are major obstacles for many throughout the state and the country.

Throughout the event, held July 31st - August 1st, a team of reporters from the KBIA Health & Wealth Desk spoke to the patients receiving treatment at the event, and the volunteers who made it all possible.

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