Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

An Italian newspaper reports that the Vatican's commission on sainthood has recognized the 1980 assassination of Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero as martyrdom, paving the way for his eventual sainthood.

Romero was archbishop of San Salvador at the start of El Salvador's 1979-1992 civil war. He was gunned down while celebrating Mass in March 1980 after denouncing a crackdown on leftist opponents of the country's military government.

A judge in Florida has sentenced former Florida A&M University student Dante Martin to six years in prison for manslaughter and felony hazing in the 2011 death of his fellow band member, drum major Robert Champion.

Radical Muslim cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri, who was convicted eight months ago of federal terrorism-related charges in New York, has been sentenced to life in prison.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

Boko Haram extremists, who seized a northern garrison town in Nigeria less than a week ago, have reportedly carried out a massacre of its inhabitants, with Amnesty International saying as many as 2,000 have been killed.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa, who presided over the end of a prolonged and brutal civil war that divided the country for decades, has suffered a narrow election defeat at the hands of a former ally and Cabinet minister, Maithripala Sirisena.

Sirisena, who defected from the ruling party in November to challenge an increasingly unpopular Rajapaksa, won 51.2 percent of the vote in national elections in the island-nation.

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy added 252,000 jobs in December, capping a 12-month stretch of job growth unmatched since 1999, according to the Labor Department. In a separate survey, the department says that the unemployment rate dipped to 5.6 percent from 5.8 percent the previous month.

The Pentagon announced a plan on Thursday to save a half-billion dollars annually in a major scaling back of the U.S. military presence in Europe — including a withdrawal from an airbase in the U.K. and handing back 14 other sites to NATO allies.

It also said that its presence at one British airbase would be beefed up as part of a planned deployment of the F-35 fighter aircraft.

The U.S. has more than 60,000 troops stationed primarily in Britain, Germany and Italy. The changes would affect mainly the Army and Air Force.

Some 2,000 traffic cops in the Philippine capital are being asked to wear adult diapers during next week's visit by Pope Francis to the predominately Roman Catholic country.

So, some of them will no doubt feel relieved that they've got a place to go during what promises to be a particularly long and grueling stint at their posts. Others might prefer to just hold it.

Either way, the army of traffic enforcers, as they are known in the Philippines, should probably go easy on the morning coffee during the pontiff's January 15-19 visit.

More than a dozen United Airlines flight attendants who were fired for their insistence on additional screening measures after discovering "menacing" graffiti scrawled on an airplane have filed a federal complaint against their former employer.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

The bells of Notre Dame cathedral in Paris tolled, public transport was halted and many in France stood in the rain today for a minute of silence observed on behalf of the eight journalists and two others killed in a deadly attack at the offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

In a further sign that Pope Francis is intent on shaping a Church that looks like the world, the pontiff announced today the selection of 20 new cardinals from 18 different countries, including several from Asia, Africa and Oceania.

The National Catholic Reporter says:

Islamist Boko Haram militants seized a military base used by a multinational force in Nigeria's northeastern Borno state, officials and witnesses say.

The town of Baga is the unofficial headquarters of the multinational troops drawn from Niger, Nigeria, Chad and Cameroon.

The longtime host of ESPN's SportsCenter, Stuart Scott, died today at age 49 after a prolonged battle with cancer, according to the cable network.

Scott was famous for his enthusiasm and a bevy of catchphrases he mined in his commentary, including "Boo-Yah!" and "As cool as the other side of the pillow."

Updated at 12:50 noon ET

Thousands of police officers from across the country paid their respects to NYPD detective Wenjian Liu, one of two patrolmen who were gunned down last month in an unprovoked attack in a Brooklyn neighborhood.

Liu's widow, Pei Xia Chen, said "he is my hero." The couple had been married only a few weeks when the officer was killed on Dec. 20.

North Korea has lashed out at the U.S. for the latest sanctions imposed on the hard-line regime in response to its alleged hacking of Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Updated at 9:40 a.m. ET

Four more bodies and a fifth large piece of debris have been recovered from the Java Sea near the crash site of AirAsia Flight QZ8501, which went down a week ago with 162 people aboard.

The BBC quotes search-and-rescue chief Bambang Soelistyo as saying today that:

"Singapore navy vessel RSS Persistence had recovered one body, while US navy ship USS Sampson had brought three more back to the Indonesian town of Pangkalan Bun.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

Former Massachusetts Sen. Edward Brooke, the first African-American to be popularly elected to the U.S. Senate, died Saturday at age 95, a family spokesman said.

Brooke, a Republican who had been Massachusetts attorney general, was first elected in 1966, defeating former Massachusetts Gov. Endicott Peabody. Brooke served until 1979. He died at his home in Coral Gables, Fla., surrounded by his family.

The trial of Boston marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will go ahead as scheduled, beginning on Monday after a federal appeals court rejected a motion to delay it.

In a 2-to-1 ruling, the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the defense had not met the "extraordinary" standard that would be required to delay the trial.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

Israel says it will halt about $127 million in monthly tax revenue that it normally transfers to the Palestinians in retaliation for a move by President Mahmoud Abbas to move toward joining the International Criminal Court and other international agencies.

Police in India's eastern city of Kolkata have arrested several suspects for allegedly kidnapping and holding a young Japanese student for weeks while they repeatedly raped her.

The unidentified woman was abducted from a village near Bodh Gaya, one of Buddhism's most sacred sites, located about 80 miles south of Patna, The Associated Press quotes police officer Akhilesh Singh as saying. Authorities believe she was kidnapped by an organized gang that targets single women tourists.

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Abu Anas al-Libi, the man who allegedly planned the 1998 attack on U.S. embassy buildings in East Africa and was awaiting trial in America, has died of complications from liver surgery, the Justice Department confirms.

Al-Libi, believed to have been an al-Qaida operative, was captured by U.S. special forces in the Libyan capital in Oct. 2013 and brought to the U.S. to stand trial.

Donna Douglas, the actress best known for her role as Elly May Clampett on the 1960s television hit comedy The Beverly Hillbillies, has died at age 81, a family member confirms.

Indonesian officials say 21 more bodies from AirAsia Flight QZ8501 were recovered today from the Java Sea, bringing the number of bodies found from the air disaster to 30.

The Associated Press quotes an Indonesian official as saying five of the bodies recovered today were still strapped to their seats.

President Obama today issued an executive order authorizing expanded sanctions against North Korea and the ruling Workers' Party of Korea in response to Pyongyang's alleged role in the hacking of Sony Pictures Entertainment.

The White House accused North Korea of "destructive, coercive cyber-related actions during November and December 2014."

Kim Yo Jong, the youngest sister of the North Korean leader, who holds a key high-level post in the secretive party hierarchy, has reportedly married a son of one of the country's most powerful officials, South Korea's Yonhap news agency says, quoting unnamed Chinese sources.

North Korea's state media reported last year that Kim Jong Un's sister, who is reportedly in her late 20s, had assumed a senior position in the ruling Workers' Party.

Revenue at casinos in the Asian gambling mecca of Macau fell in 2014 for the first time in more than a decade, as Chinese government officials are increasingly betting that it's a bad idea to show their wealth amid Beijing's aggressive crackdown on corruption.

According to data released today by Macau's Gaming Inspection and Coordination Bureau, revenue at the territory's casinos fell 2.6 percent in 2014, with December posting a record 30.4 percent fall over the same period in 2013.

Updated at 6:31 p.m. ET

A ship carrying hundreds of Syrian migrants that was abandoned by smugglers off the coast of Italy was towed to the port of Corigliano.

An Icelandic coast guard ship, part of a European patrol force set up to aid migrants at sea, towed the Ezadeen, a livestock carrier with some 450 migrants aboard, after smugglers operating the vessel abandoned it in rough seas, according to Italian coast guard Cmdr. Filippo Marini.

The Turkish man who tried to kill Pope John Paul II and subsequently spent three decades in jail, has laid flowers at the tomb of the former pontiff.

Mehmet Ali Ağca shot John Paul twice at close range on May 13, 1981 as the pope was traveling in an open car through St. Peter's Square in Vatican City, an attack that left the pope in critical condition.

The gunman was quickly arrested. John Paul recovered and later met Ağca in prison, where the pontiff forgave his would-be killer.

Thousands of vehicles are stranded in the French Alps unable to come or go from ski resorts in southeastern France due to particularly heavy snowfall and icy conditions.

One man was reportedly killed when his car slid off into a ravine.

The BBC reports that as many as 15,000 motorists who spent Saturday night unable to move due to the snow and ice, are still unable to move in the region of Savoie, west of Turin, Italy.

A senior commander of Iran's Revolutionary Guards was killed by a sniper's bullet in the northern Iraqi city of Samarra as he was training Iraqi troops and Shiite militiamen fighting militants of the self-declared Islamic State, Iran says.

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