Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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World
2:37 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

Battles Against Oppressive Regimes Led To Nobel

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The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to three women on Friday. From left: President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, Liberian "peace warrior" Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karman of Yemen.

AP

Originally published on Fri October 7, 2011 4:58 pm

The three women who won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize were lauded for their courage in standing up to the violence and brutality of oppressive regimes in Liberia and Yemen.

The five-member Nobel Committee in Norway announced Friday that it would split the coveted award three ways, honoring Africa's first democratically elected female president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf; Liberian campaigner Leymah Gbowee; and Yemeni democracy activist Tawakkul Karman.

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Remembering Steve Jobs (1955-2011)
1:51 pm
Fri October 7, 2011

After Jobs, Who Will Be Next American Visionary?

Thomas Edison transformed American industry and culture with his inventions, such as the phonograph and the motion picture camera. He also developed a long-lasting electric light bulb and founded General Electric.

Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:20 am

Visionary. Uncompromising. Intuitive. Risk-taking. Steve Jobs — the man who helped build a company and used it to transform multiple industries and popular culture — could have been lifted from the pages of a college textbook on how to be a successful CEO.

He was "the most incredible businessperson in the world," Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak told CBS News on Thursday, a day after Jobs' death.

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Around the Nation
8:00 am
Thu October 6, 2011

Under A Barrel: What Happened To Rising Gas Prices?

The price of gasoline stood at $3.17 earlier this week in Wakefield, Mass. That's more than 20 cents less than the national average for regular gas.

Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Thu October 6, 2011 10:40 am

When Dave Barnes drove 600 miles from Maryland to Indiana last week for his 50th high school reunion, he was surprised by the price of gas — in a good way.

Barnes, 68, says he filled up his Dodge Challenger in Indianapolis for as little as $3.15 a gallon. It was a far cry from the cross-country motorcycle trip he took this summer.

"When I took the trip in June, I was seeing $3.60 a gallon in most places and as high as $4 a gallon in California," he says.

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National Security
10:25 am
Fri September 30, 2011

Awlaki: From San Diego Cleric To Wanted Terrorist

U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki was killed Friday in a U.S. airstrike in Yemen. U.S. officials say he was linked to several major terrorist plots in recent years.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Fri September 30, 2011 5:13 pm

Anwar al-Awlaki was born in New Mexico, educated in Colorado and spent years as a cleric in San Diego and suburban Washington, D.C. But in the past several years, he became a master al-Qaida propagandist whose sermons inspired jihadists worldwide before his death Friday by a U.S. missile on a desert road in northern Yemen.

Awlaki's journey from a childhood in Las Cruces, N.M., to the Arabian Peninsula placed him in the cross hairs of U.S. intelligence after he was linked to the failed "underwear bomber," the Fort Hood shooter and the foiled plot to bomb New York's Times Square.

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Law
3:14 pm
Thu September 29, 2011

Law Doesn't Mark End Of Alabama Immigration Battle

Gov. Robert Bentley talks with reporters outside the Capitol in Montgomery, Ala., on Wednesday. Bentley said he will work with the state attorney general to appeal the parts of the decision that struck down sections of the state's illegal immigrant law.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Fri September 30, 2011 4:37 am

Alabama's toughest-in-the-nation law on illegal immigration went into effect Thursday, a day after a federal judge upheld some of its key provisions, but the court battle over the issue appears far from over.

State law enforcement can now question and detain without bond people they suspect may be in the country illegally, and public schools are required to verify students' immigration status.

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Tue September 27, 2011

How Do You Mend A Broken Monument? Call The 'Difficult Access Team'

At 555 feet above Washington, the work begins.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

If you're afraid of heights, this is definitely not your dream job.

Tuesday, five engineers began a series of rappelling operations down the face of the Washington Monument to assess damage caused by the Aug. 23 earthquake that shook the nation's capital. The five belong to a special "difficult access team" from Northbrook, Ill.-based Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc., or WJE.

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Middle East
3:06 pm
Wed September 21, 2011

Tiny Nation Played Pivotal Role In Americans' Release

The two American men who stepped out of an Iranian prison Wednesday after spending more than two years in custody may have a tiny Persian Gulf nation to thank for greasing the wheels of their release.

Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal, both 29, had been accused of espionage along with fellow American Sarah Shourd and sentenced to eight years in prison. They were freed in exchange for $1 million dollars and flown to Oman.

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Technology
4:02 pm
Fri September 16, 2011

Anonymous Comes Out In The Open

A demonstrator wears a Guy Fawkes mask typically worn by followers of the cyberguerrilla group Anonymous during an Aug. 15 protest inside a Bay Area Rapid Transit station in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 16, 2011 5:17 pm

"Hacktivists" are hitting the streets.

The cyberguerrilla group Anonymous — known for high-profile computer attacks on corporate and government targets — is urging its followers to come out from behind their PCs on Saturday and occupy Wall Street.

The aim: an Arab Spring-style protest over the "abuse and corruption of corporations, banks and governments."

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Technology
3:59 pm
Fri September 16, 2011

Hacking Made Easier, Thanks To New Tools

iStockphoto.com

Time was when it took a fair amount of expertise to launch the kinds of illegal computer attacks that have become the hallmarks of "hacktivist" groups like Anonymous.

Today, just about anyone can download user-friendly software capable of crippling websites. One such tool is LOIC [Low Orbit Ion Cannon], which was used in Anonymous' attack on MasterCard, Visa and other companies late last year.

It's rumored that the group will release another weapon, called #RefRef, on Saturday.

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Energy
2:19 pm
Fri September 9, 2011

Electric Grid Was Designed To Prevent Arizona Outage

Downtown San Diego is dark after a massive blackout hit Southern California on Thursday. Approximately 1.5 million residents from Southern Orange County to Northern Baja were without power.
Sandy Huffaker Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:26 am

If you thought that the nation's electrical grid was designed to prevent a single, localized malfunction from triggering a blackout for millions of people, you'd be right.

But that didn't prevent that exact event from happening Thursday in San Diego, parts of Arizona, and Mexico's Baja peninsula. Phoenix-based Arizona Public Service Co. said the blackout started when a piece of monitoring equipment was removed at a substation in Yuma, along the border with Mexico.

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