Travis McMillen

Video Producer

TRAVIS McMILLEN is the video producer for the Futures Lab, located on the lower level of the Reynolds Journalism Institute. As video producer, McMillen directs and produces regular and occasional programming from RJI’s own production studio, including KBIA-FM’s Views of the News, Global Journalist and Radio Friends with Paul Pepper. He is a Columbia native who started working at KOMU-TV, the University of Missouri’s NBC affiliate, at the age of 16. At 18 McMillen became the audio operator for Pepper and Friends, a community variety and talk show that aired on KOMU for 27 years. It was a position he held for almost 10 years. Aside from audio, McMillen’s duties on the show included field segment videographer and editor and, from 2001-2007, primary fill-in director. McMillen also directed KOMU’s daily two-hour morning newscast from 2001-2008. He is married to Jennifer, whom he met at KOMU. She currently produces the CW News at Nine for the station. They have three boys.

Ways to Connect

Today Paul Pepper visits with HANNAH REEVES, Director, Sager | Braudis Gallery, about their brand new autumn exhibit opening tomorrow in the North Village Arts District in Columbia. Hannah also touches on what we have to look forward to from Sager | Braudis in 2018 (hint: even more exhibits!). At [4:05] JANE WHITESIDES, Executive Director of the Missouri Symphony Society, invites young kiddos (2nd grade and up) to join a brand new orchestra called Overture to Strings. No audition is necessary! Also, be sure to mark your calendars for the Piano Showcase, the Holiday Home Tour, the Symphony of Toys and more! October 2, 2017

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back the Boone County Hams! They perform two numbers: "Zombie Jamboree" at [1:50] and a slightly different take on "What a Wonderful World" at [4:20]. If you think you've got what it takes to sing with these guys, join them at their next practice - watch for details! September 29, 2017

Today Paul Pepper visits with LEIGH ANNE HAUN, Director of Development at Woodhaven, about their annual fundraising dinner and silent auction happening October 3rd in Columbia. There is no cost to attend the event, but reservations are required. Watch for details! At [3:50] longtime local newspaper columnist BILL CLARK tells us how he's officially entered the 21st century. In short, Bill's primary platform, after years of writing for a print publication, is now a website. Find out how it's going so far and how you can subscribe! September 28, 2017

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. Also, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg acknowledges the platform’s advertising practices are flawed, Megyn Kelly’s ‘Today’ debut, and interactions between reporters and police during the ongoing protests in St. Louis. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Today Paul Pepper is joined by the cast of "Quilters," the latest production at Maples Repertory Theatre in Macon! They perform two numbers from the show: "Pieces of Lives" at [1:19] and "Windmill" at [5:16]. Artistic Director TODD DAVISON tells us that "Quilters" is more than just a show - find out why! September 27, 2017

Today Paul Pepper visits with JOSH KIRBY about the Fayette Area Community Theatre's annual Wine & Spirits Walk. This is an important fundraiser for FACT, which is in need of a theatre to call home. Watch for details! At [3:15] LAINIE VANSANT and MURPHY WARD invite everyone to come see MU Theatre's production of "You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown." This family-friendly favorite is running this Wednesday through Sunday only at the Rhynsburger Theatre on the MU campus! September 26, 2017

Today Paul Pepper and CLAUDIA SCHOONOVER, Director of Missouri River Regional Library, talk about "The End of Your Life Book Club". Author Will Schwalbe's "love letter" to his mother is the chosen book for year's 'Capital Read' program. Will is visiting Jefferson City later this week - watch for details! At [4:21] Mizzou graduate students MILLA TITOVA, psychology, and TAYLOR KELTY, biomedical sciences, are here to tell us what they'll be talking about at this Wednesday's Science on Tap COMO event at Craft Beer Cellar in Columbia. September 25, 2017

Emmy host Stephen Colbert invites former White House press secretary Sean Spicer to appear on stage at last Sunday's ceremony. Who wasn't in on the joke? Was Harvard "behaving stupidly" when it rescinded an invitation to Chelsea Manning to become a visiting fellow? Also, reactions by ESPN management after Jemele Hill speaks out against #Trump; and will Ken Burns' latest documentary about the #VietnamWar attract an audience beyond the baby boomers who lived through it? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey. KBIA 91.3 FM

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? Also, the ethics of undercover reporting, why the Department of Justice wants some RT associates to register as foreign agents, and Disney’s attempt to bring back the Mickey Mouse Club – or should we say Club Mickey Mouse. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? Also, why the EPA called an AP report about Houston superfund sites yellow journalism, an ESPN commentator quits rather than call football games, and Tronc’s move to buy the New York Daily News. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Reporters are stepping up to cover Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath in ways we haven’t seen in more than a decade. This week, a look at some of the personal stories, the changes in technology and what’s still to come in the reporting from south Texas. Also, ESPN’s decision to pull a broadcaster from a University of Virgina football game because of his name, the removal of a novel from the New York Times’ Bestseller List, and the end of an era in “pop” music. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? Also, what’s ahead for Steve Bannon and Breitbart News now that he’s back at the alt-right news site following his departure from the White House, brands back off from advertising amid politically and racially-charged news coverage. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests. A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story. Is there enough context? Professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel discuss this and more on this week's Views of the News.

Megyn Kelly’s profile of Infowars’ founder Alex Jones has run – in most U.S. cites. Did it live up to the hype? Also, rumors Sean Spicer is searching for his replacement, Fox News drops its iconic “Fair & Balanced” slogan, and coverage of the Cosby mistrial. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Megyn Kelly is under attack for an interview with Infowars' Alex Jones set to air Sunday evening on NBC. Will the interview expose a conspiracy theorist or just give him a platform to spread this beliefs? Also, an Oregon newspaper’s decision to report on a prominent college athelete’s sexual molestation conviction, Montana Congressman-elect Greg Gianforte pleads guilty to misdemeanor assault for taking down the Guardian’s Ben Jacobs in a headlock, and the media circus around the Comey and Sessions senate hearings. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jeimmie Nevalga: Views of the News.

Is she the next Edward Snowden? We’ll talk about the arrest of Reality Leigh Winner on charges of leaking top-secret documents detailing a 2016 Russian cyberattack on election software. Also, the call for Bill Maher’s ouster from HBO, how President Trump’s tweets immediately following the London terror attacks could affect his efforts to reinstate the travel ban and a controversial column from the Columbia Daily Tribune’s new publisher. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Fox News announced it is retracting its story on Seth Rich. The DNC staffer was murdered in Washington D.C. last summer. The cable network has been reporting for more than a week that his slaying came 12 days after contacting Wikileaks. Now, it says that reporting doesn’t stand up to its editorial standards. What changed? Also, remembering Roger Ailes and the complicated legacy he leaves behind, Anderson Cooper’s snarky streak continues, and the guidance Facebook gives employees for removing hate speech, sexually explicit or violent content from the site. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


The Washington Post reports that President Donald Trump shared classified intelligence with a Russian envoy during a meeting in the Oval Office last week. The Trump administration denies the report – while the president is tweeted to the contrary. Where’s the truth? Also, the Chicago Tribune’s parent company makes a play for the Sun-Times, a Colorado law exposes journalists voting habits, and a story of modern-day slavery in the United States. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

President Trump’s decision to fire now-former FBI Director James Comey came as a surprise to almost everyone Tuesday afternoon. How did reporters react in the moments and hours following the announcement? Sinclair Broadcast Group, the largest television station ownership group in the U.S., is about to get even bigger with the purchase of Tribune Media. And, why Wisconsin’s governor wants to cut a popular outdoors magazine, the FCC’s investigation into complaints about Stephen Colbert and Richard Simmons’ lawsuit against the National Enquirer. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Fox News Channel is under new leadership. But, will Suzanne Scott bring true cultural change to an organization rife with claims of gender and racial bias? Also, President Trumps first 100 days, New York Times and climate science and Heineken’s new viral ad people are calling the antidote to the Pepsi debacle from last month. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Fox News ousts Bill O'Reilly amid sexual harassment allegations. Video posted of a brutal murder in Cleveland forces Facebook to address the question again: is it a media company? What obligation does it have to monitor for criminal or violent content? Also, the White House’s decision not to make visitor logs public, can a commercial for McDonald’s be effective without any mention of McDonald’s and why Boston’s Fox affiliate is dropping network branding. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Just when United Airlines couldn’t afford any more bad press, a customer is forcibly removed after refusing to deplane – and it’s caught on camera. Can the airline rebound and reclaim its reputation? Also, did Pepsi do enough in pulling that ad featuring Kendall Jenner, Fox’s announcement of an investigation into sexual harassment claims against Bill O’Reilly, and a celebration of the year’s best journalism.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Advertisers are walking away from Bill O’Reilly and Fox News following a New York Times report indicated more than $13 million had been paid out to those accusing him of sexual harassment. One year after Roger Ailes left the cable network following similar accusations, what’s ahead for O’Reilly? Also, what repealing online privacy laws mean for consumers and journalists alike, the influence Tennessee legislators may have had over a public radio reporter’s firing and the choice to lead a local newscast with a flying turkey. Yes, a flying turkey. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

President Trump’s budget proposal calls for the elimination of four independent cultural agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Everyone has been talking about what that means for NPR and PBS, but what about the stations you rely on in rural areas? Also, why Secretary of State Rex Tillerson eschews a press pool, remembering legendary columnist Jimmy Breslin and the end of the Missing Richard Simmons podcast. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Are you Missing Richard Simmons? The new podcast from filmmaker Dan Taberski is drawing national attention unseen since the launch of Serial more than two years ago. What’s the draw? Also, President Trump’s tax returns, new surveillance video of Michael Brown raises new questions about what happened in Ferguson in 2014, why Missouri’s two largest newspapers are teaming up to challenge Gov. Eric Greitens, and what happens when the local television newscast moves out of town. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why? Also, how President Trump came to believe former President Obama tapped his phones, WikiLeaks latest data dump, reporting on medical breakthroughs and newsrooms’ role in the International Day of the Woman. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

Should all credentialed press be admitted to a White House briefing? White House Press Secretary excluded reporters from several major national news organizations last week. Why did he do it? And, what’s the industry’s response? Also, the president’s decision to skip the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, new marketing strategies from two of the nation’s largest newspapers, and an Oscars night few will ever forget.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Does the use of anonymous sources and leaked material by journalists make them the enemy? We haven’t heard words like that from a president since the days of Richard Nixon. Also, why Simon & Schuster and CPAC are backing away from Breitbart Senior Editor Milo Yiannopoulos, how BuzzFeed plans to break you out of your news bubble and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations? Also, Sean Spicer draws in the daytime TV audience, Playboy goes back to its old playbook with a return to nude photos, Bob Costas steps aside, making way for Mike Tirico to host NBC’s primetime Olympic programming. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?” Also, Bill O’Reilly’s reaction to criticism from the Kremlin, how fake news is creating a chilling effect on satirists, and what to expect from Snapchat after its parent company goes public. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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