Trevor Harris

Announcer

Trevor serves as KBIA’s weekday morning host for classical music. He has been involved with local radio since 1990, when he began volunteering as a music and news programmer at KOPN, Columbia's community radio station. Before joining KBIA, Trevor studied social work at Mizzou and earned a masters degree in geography at the University of Alabama. He has worked in community development and in urban and bicycle/pedestrian planning, and recently served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia with his wife, Lisa Groshong. An avid bicycle commuter and jazz fan, Trevor has cycled as far as Colorado and pawed through record bins in three continents.

Ways To Connect

Matthew Washburn

When you were growing up did you play classical music? Did you have your own instrument? The classical classical duo Zofo - made up of Eva-Maria Zimmermann and Keisuke Nakagoshi - play one piano. At the same time. KBIA's Trevor Harris  recently talked with the duo by phone about the nature of playing one piano with four hands, the process of commissioning new music for their repertoire and their new CD Zoforbit.

Credit: JudithZaimont.com

A pair of members of the virtuoso ensemble the Cypress String Quartet recently talked with KBIA's Trevor Harris. That interview and a talk with contemporary American composer Judith Zaimont are the topics on this week's Thinking Out Loud on KBIA.

Trevor Harris/KBIA

From 1914 to 1954 if you were black in Kirksville you attended the segregated Lincoln School. In this episode of Thinking Out Loud hear voices of Lincoln School alumni Clyde Johnson and a handful of local residents who want to see the Lincoln School building preserved. Some local visionaries imagine the school as a 21st century educational center for all residents of Kirksville.

Brooke Hamilton/Grindstone Photography

Establishing a landscape rich in native plant species is a different process from putting in an annual planting of tomatoes and beans. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris talked with Elizabeth Hamilton-Steele about the work that goes in to building a native landscape for yard or pasture.


Credit: IMDB

Each summer, Kirk Trevor and the Missouri Symphony Society take classical music to a range of venues around Columbia and Mid-Missouri. From Stephens Lake Park to Douglass Park to Shelter Gardens, classical music fans get to absorb symphonic and chamber works in a range of diverse settings. This Thursday, the Missouri Symphony Orchestra returns to the Missouri Theatre stage to play film music.

Credit: www.umigarrett.com

What were you doing when you were thirteen? Umi Garrett is thirteen and she's possibly accomplished more than you and I put together had by that age. And then some. Garrett's been playing professionally since age eight. You can hear her perform this Saturday night when she joins the Missouri Symphony Orchestra at the Missouri Theatre for a concert the Missouri Symphony Society bills as Umi Returns


University of Missouri Press

If you are a creative type, then you may have given some thought to the process behind creating. Whether you paint, write essays or solve engineering problems, Columbia author William Least Heat-Moon has written a book that illuminates the creative process. Least Heat-Moon discussed his new book Writing Blue Highways on KBIA's Thinking Out Loud. He also speaks this Thursday at 7:00 p.m at the Daniel Boone Regional Library in Columbia.

Latisha Koetting

Next Monday is Memorial Day, a date established by Congress in 1968 as America's national day to remember and honor those American men and women who died in combat. If you are a veteran or know one, you likely think about those who died in combat on days other than just the last Monday in May each year. This week on Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talked to veterans and their supporters about what they think about each year on Memorial Day.


Credit: Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre

On this weeks' Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with Quin Gresham, the Producing Artistic Director for the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre about the upcoming season at the theatre.

Credit: Marty Paten

When you first came to Columbia how did you arrive? Was it by car or bus? For several generations university and college students coming to Columbia almost entirely came by rail. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talked with a rider on the historic Wabash railroad into Columbia and the man who literally who wrote the book on the Columbia Branch Railroad.

Jon Poses

Over thirty-five years ago, Jon Poses came to Columbia for a journalism degree. He's long since got that degree. Today, for consistent advocacy of live jazz in Columbia, Jon Poses was recently named a 2014 Jazz Journalists Association 'Jazz Hero.'

Credit: GMD Three, Tyler Boye, Laura Watilo Blake, Lilian Finckel, Ken Blaze

This week on KBIA we're featuring music from the new release by guitarist Jason Vieaux, Play. You can hear tracks from the Azica Recrods release Play this week on KBIA. On this his thirteenth recording, Vieaux offers up a set of seventeen shorter pieces from guitarist-composers including Antonio Lauro and Andres Segovia.


Credit: Gene Royer/MU School of Music

This summer as in the past several summers, a festival comes to Mid-Missouri that brings contemporary classical composers, performers and fans together from around the world.

Credit: The State Historical Society of Missouri

When you think about the Civil War in Missouri what comes to mind? If Stefan Freund has anything to do with it you'll soon be more familiar with the sounds and images that the 1861-65 conflict produced. KBIA's Trevor Harris recently interviewed Freund, an MU School of Music faculty member about his new Civil War Oratorio that will have its premiere April 24 in Columbia's Jesse Auditorium.

Credit: Missouri Department of Conservation

Native or new-comer? No matter how long you and your family have called the Great State of Missouri home you can't claim a longer continuous lineage here than the paddlefish. This week on Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris talks to anglers and conservationists about the fish that has called central Missouri's Osage River home for more than 300 million years.


State Historical Society of Missouri

Roxanne Foster preserved some of Columbia's historical memory last year. In pursuit of her Masters Degree in News Reporting and Writing from MU's School of Journalism, Foster interviewed and recorded the stories of ten black and white Columbians who lived here during the desegregation era. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Trevor Harris visited with Foster about her subjects, their common themes and more. The State Historical Society of Missouri's Oral Historian Jeff Corrigan was Foster's advisor. Together, they recorded, transcribed and archived stories unique to Columbia in the late 1950s through the mid-1960s.

Janet Macoska

Concert alert: Jim Brickman is coming to Columbia's Jesse Auditorium Monday, March 31. The adult contemporary star talked with KBIA's Trevor Harris recently about Brickman's training, his career and his genre-spanning collaborations.

Facebook/Odyssey Chamber Music Series

Settle in to listen to an hour of classical music on the radio and you'll mostly hear the works of male composers. It isn't that women do not compose in the classical genre, so why don't we hear them more often? KBIA's Ariel Morrision recently asked two local women what's behind the gender imbalance in classical compositions.


Credit Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

Rare violins, finding a balance, and revisiting a Baroque masterpiece filled this week's Thinking Out Loud. KBIA's Trevor Harris interviewed violinist Anne Akiko Meyers about her new release featuring Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons.


AlisaWeilerstein.com

KBIA's CD of the Week this week is the new release from cellist Alisa Weilerstein. The January 2014 Decca issue pairs Weilerstein with the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra for performances of works written by Czech Antonin Dvorak during a period the composer spent in the United States.

So Percussion

This Sunday, February 9 the chamber ensemble So Percussion brings their creative classical performance to Columbia's Missouri Theatre. KBIA's Trevor Harris recently asked So Percussion member Adam Sliwinski about the band's history, their repertoire and their commitment to teaching their craft to a new generation of percussion-oriented classical music students.

KBIA/Trevor Harris

On this week's Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with organizers of the Third Goal International Film Festival. The festival is an annual one-day festival of film viewings that have the U.S.  Peace Corps as a central theme. This year's festival happens Saturday, February 1 on the MU campus.

Pug Dog Records/Charle Powell

Negative experiences that humans live through can be evident or may be deeply buried. Music as an assistive therapy can guide healing from past traumas, help people be more productive or just relax. On this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud KBIA producer Trevor Harris visited with a pair of local musicians working in vastly different venues to heal others.

MET Orchestra

At an age when many would the considering retirement from active work, the conductor James Levine is back on the podium.

Odyssey Chamber Music Series

If you are a fan of classical performance, opportunities were abundant this past weekend in Columbia. Classical music patrons had performances to choose from by the Odyssey Chamber Music Series, the Missouri Symphony Societies' Holiday Home Tour, The Columbia Chorale with the Columbia Civic Orchestra and the St. Louis Symphony at the Missouri Theatre. That we should we be so rich in classical performance every weekend.

Today's Zaman

When violinist Michelle Makarski approached her friend, the pianist Keith Jarrett about playing some Johann Sebastian Bach sonatas, recording those works wasn’t necessarily in their initial plans.

Avanti Classic

In the world of opera, many classical music aficionados have their favorites. When it came time to select pieces for their new CD of piano-violin duets, Lily Maisky and Phillipe Quint did some soul searching to find works that were most personal for them. The result of that process is the new release Opera Breve, a CD featuring 13 tracks specifically tailored for Maisky and Quint’s violin-piano duets.

Courtesy: www.EldarMusic.com

From experience I can confirm that it’s hard work to become decent on a musical instrument. No matter the musical genre or instrument, it takes consistent practice to become listenable. I’m not saying I’ve gotten listenable yet with my bass and guitar playing.

Aaron Dunn

Classical music fans are increasingly using the web to share music. On any given evening you could curl up with your laptop or iPad and feast on performances of Beethoven’s Ninth, Durufle’s Requiem and lots more. Services such as the Naxos Music LIbrary make recordings available for a membership fee.

Missouri Symphony Society

Classical music seems like a genre that was made to be performed indoors. Symphonic music was born in the chambers of European royalty and in Catholic churches. The music was created by patrons who wanted to support the arts and also demonstrate their largesse. Take the classical music out of the concert hall and what do you have?

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