Global Journalist: Uzbekistan's Dictatorship at a Crossroads

Oct 20, 2016

Credit AP Photo

The central Asian nation of Uzbekistan is known for its spectacular mosques, vast fields of cotton and immense natural gas reserves.

It's also one of the world's most repressive police states, where the government reportedly once disposed of two political prisoners by boiling them alive.

But Uzbekistan's regime has been shaken by the death last month of President Islam Karimov - the only president the country has had since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Uzbekistan after the dictator's death.


Joining the program:

  • Navbahor Imamova, a journalist for the Voice of America's Uzbek service
  • Muhammad Tahir, host of the Majlis podcast about Central Asia from Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
  • Sarah Kendzior, a freelance journalist who has written about Uzbekistan for the New York Times, Foreign Policy and The Atlantic
  • Steve Swerdlow, a Central Asia researcher for Human Rights Watch