Off the Clock

Fridays at 5:20pm

KBIA News brings you a look at the arts and entertainment this week in mid-Missouri.

Off the Clock - HungerU Makes a Trip to the Midwest

Oct 16, 2015
Emma Nicolas/ KBIA

  There are more than 795 million people hungry globally according to the Global Food Security Index. HungerU is trying to change that. Its large tour bus treks from campus to campus getting college students involved in the fight to stop hunger.

HungerU’s huge blue and black trailer has visited more than 65 college campuses across the U.S. since its mission first started three years ago. This year will be the group’s seventh tour, and first time visiting the Midwest.

Off the Clock: A Brief History Lesson with David McCullough

Oct 9, 2015
Riley Beggin/ KBIA

Pulitzer-prize winning historian David McCullough spoke Wednesday evening at the Missouri Theatre on the lessons to be learned from the founding fathers. McCullough’s lecture marked the opening of the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy, which supports the study of the American democratic tradition at MU.

McCullough has written biographies on historical figures like John Adams, Harry Truman, Theodore Roosevelt and—most recently—the Wright Brothers. In addition to his Pulitzers, he has been awarded the National Book Award and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The Roots N' Blues N' BBQ Festival entered its ninth year and third at Stephen's Lake Park. This year the festival had a record number of vendors and saw the likes of Buddy Guy, Brandi Carlile and Dwight Yoakam grace their stages.

Last weekend, I spent some time at the festival talking to festival goers about their favorite artists and vendors and asking what advice they would give to first timers. This week, on Off the Clock, listen to some of the sounds of the weekend. Enjoy the audio postcard from the 2015 Roots N' Blues festival.

Off the Clock: Razia Hutchins’ I am For Peace Movement

Sep 25, 2015

  Razia Hutchins grew up in Chicago, around violence. After hearing about a young man being murdered outside a high school basketball game, Hutchins decided it was her turn to make a change.

The City of Columbia participated in Parking Day for the second year in a row. The idea for Parking Day was started in 2005 in San Francisco and has since turned into an international event. GetAbout Columbia Outreach Coordinator Janet Godon said this event was about interaction more than anything else. Multiple businesses took place in the event downtown. An arts and crafts tent, bocce court, park benches and live music were all available for entertainment. 

Off the Clock: Faith Voices, a discussion on race

Apr 24, 2015

Racial tension sparked civil unrest in Ferguson after the death of Michael Brown last August, bringing the issue of racial profiling of African American males by police officers to the forefront. Members of Faith Voices for Jefferson City believe the larger conversation of racial profiling in Missouri is long overdue. In January, members of Faith Voices for Jefferson City and local faith leaders embarked on a yearlong conversation on race at Quinn Chapel AME Church. One of the goals was to create an open discussion on race between African American residents and Caucasian residents rather than segregating it in the comfort of their homes.

Jenn Cooper / KBIA

This week KBIA’s arts and culture segment producer Jenn Cooper hung out with the Columbia Jazz Jam group to explore Columbia’s Jazz scene during April’s Jazz Appreciation Month.

Off the Clock: The Sassy I-70 Signs and the Woman Responsible for Them

Apr 10, 2015
File photo / MoDot

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment, KBIA’s Abigail Keel chats with Linda Wilson Horn, the woman who writes the sassy messages on the Missouri Department of Transportation’s Dynamic Message signs along I-70. 


This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA reporter Jason Hoffman sat down with local author, George Hodgman. His memoir Bettyville discusses some of the issues faced caring for an elderly parent as well as those of being gay in small town America.

Here’s the full-length interview: 

Columbia-based novelist Keija Parssinen’s first book, The Ruins of Us, was a Columbia One Read selection in 2013. The novel centered is around a crumbling marriage between an American expat and her Saudi billionaire husband. Parssinen’s new novel, The Unraveling of Mercy Louis, is set closer to home: it takes place in a small Texas refinery town that grows increasingly zealous in its attempts to control its population of teenage girls. The town’s paranoia builds toward an outbreak of mass hysteria and a modern-day witch trial. Parssinen spoke with KBIA about the research behind her new book; she began by comparing the Saudi Arabia of her first book with the Texas town she describes in her new novel.

Off the Clock: New Ownership, New Changes at Columbia's Blue Note

Mar 27, 2015
Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

Other than the Missouri Theatre — the Blue Note and Rose Music Hall, formerly known as Mojo’s — are two of the most established concert venues in not only Columbia, but in Mid-Missouri.

For the past 34 years, the venues grew up and flourished under the supervision of one person — Richard King. However, at the tail end of last year, King sold the spaces to the owners of the Majestic Theatre in Madison, Wisconsin. While the sale wasn’t necessarily unexpected, it did prompt many venue-goers to wonder what would happen to the cherished institution — mostly — what changes, if any, would be visible.

In this recent series of commentaries for, Missouri student journalists recount a few of life’s confusing lessons. Led by Missouri School of Journalism Professor and storytelling master Berkley Hudson, these 9 student commentators took not only pen to paper but also got in front of the microphone, to talk out these essays that touch on life, relationships, sticky situations and coming of age, among other issues. Enjoy!

Phil Gold / Flickr

Warning: do not listen to this story if you are hungry.  In what started as a simple craving for good Mexican food, KBIA producers Meredith Turk and John Farmer de la Torre discovered a small, but active group of tamale makers in Columbia, Missouri.   In fact, they stumbled upon the biggest Mexican tamale-making day of the year.  For this story, our sources only wanted us to use first names.


Jadde Turk / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment, Off the Clock, Jadde Turk takes us to the Hallsville Community Center. She tells us about the growing popularity of square dancing in the small town. Every other Saturday, the Missouri Traditional Fiddle and Dance Network invites community members to eat and enjoy the traditional music and dance of Mid-Missouri. 

Ashley Reese / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, Ashley Reese hangs out at the Orr Street Studios with local art students and teachers for the exhibit, Under the Influence.



Kenzie Dill / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA’s Kenzie Dill spent time at the Discount Mattress Outlet, located on Interstate 70 Drive. From the outside, you’d never guess that this mattress store was also home to a dance studio.

Every Tuesday and Thursday night, the mattresses are put away and a dance floor is revealed.

Jenn Cooper / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts and culture segment Off the Clock,  KBIA's Jenn Cooper spent time with Mark  Olson, a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom and MU student, to talk about the veteran writing group he formed. 

Olson encourages student veterans and veterans in the community to express their experiences through writing.

Jenn Cooper / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA producer Jenn Cooper hangs out with Tao Weilundemo, the owner of Maya Creek, sustainable living commune in Calwood, Mo.

I-70 Sign Show

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA producer Jenn Cooper hangs out with Anne 

Thompson, the creator and curator I-70 Sign Show, a yearlong contemporary arts project.

Missouri Division of Tourism

After an award-winning festival run, the film "We Always Lie to Strangers" will air at Ragtag for a week-long run. 

David Wilson, local filmmaker and co-founder of the True False Film Festival, collaborated with MU grads AJ Schnack and Nathan Truesdell to create his first feature film. The film takes place over five years and follows four families who work in the entertainment industry in Branson, Missouri.

Red Box Films

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Fest.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

The film the Green Prince follows the unlikely journey of Mosab Hassan Yousef. Born in the Palestinian territories to a high-ranking Hamas leader, Mosab does the unthinkable: he spies on his own people for Israel’s Shin Bet intelligence agency.

Using candid interviews, archival footage, and dramatic reenactments, director Nadav Schirman follows Mosab’s transformation, and his complicated relationship with his Israeli handler, Gonen Ben Itzhak.

Misdeeds, misdemeanors, miscommunications: Life lessons from MoJo commentators on KBIA

Dec 18, 2013

In this recent series of commentaries for, Missouri student journalists recount a few of life’s confusing lessons. Led by Missouri School of Journalism Professor and storytelling master Berkley Hudson, these 11 student commentators took not only pen to paper but also got in front of the microphone, to talk out these essays that touch on life, relationships, growing up and striking out, among other issues. Enjoy!

Missouri Symphony Conservatory celebrates the holidays, on KBIA

Dec 4, 2013
Courtesy of MOSS

Have you ever discovered a new hobby that suddenly and completely consumed you? Whether you meant to do it or not your new hobby demands your time and attention. It requires that you find a teacher or a mentor who can help you take your interest to the next level.

Roxana Pop / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA producer Meredith Turk hangs out in rodeo culture with this year’s Miss Teen Rodeo queen, and finds out why she’s one of the only rodeo competitors you’ll ever see wearing a helmet … and she wears it well.

Three MU students step outside their boundaries

Oct 25, 2013

This week on Off The Clock, Joanna Demkiewicz and Kaylen Ralph, recent graduates of MU, started their own magazine to empower female journalists. And Josie Herrera is embarking on a gender-queer journey, as a king candidate on this year’s University of Missouri homecoming court.

Author details the race around the world

Oct 18, 2013

The novel Eighty Days dives into competing journalists Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland’s pursuit to break the record for fastest journey around the world in 1889. Author Matthew Goodman creates a narrative history on the 28,000 mile quest that got the attention of the nation. KBIA’s Tony Nochim sat down with Matthew Goodman while he was in Columbia.


For about the past 10 years citizens of Moberly, Mo. have been working on renovating the Fourth Street Theatre. It is being built completely debt free but is still about $200 thousand away from the goal. Theatre owners plan to open it this spring.

Joe Snodgrass grew up in Moberly, Mo. and remembers the Fourth Street Theatre being packed on Friday and Saturday nights. Now, he is a board member helping restore the theater and bringing it back to all its glory.

For first-cousin filmmakers Tracy Droz Tragos and Andrew Droz Palermo, the hardest part about filming Rich Hill, their upcoming documentary on poverty in rural Missouri, was to stop.

“I just wanted to keep visiting them and visiting them,” Tragos said.

“I think we both very much fell in love with all these families,” Palermo added. “In turn, [they] say they love us like family.”

Shane Epping

What happens when you put together a blue-eyed blonde Texas woman with a handsome Saudi man living in a traditional Saudi culture, and throw in a young secular Arab blogger and a young Muslim man rediscovering his fundamentalist roots? And, specifically, what happens when they’re all in the same family? If that sounds familiar, it's because that family is the Baylani family, whose relationships with each other, their country and their cultures are explored in the novel, The Ruins of Us.

Meredith Turk / KBIA

Close to 100 refugees filled Broadway Christian Church Saturday, during the Columbia World Refugee Day Festival.  The party started out slow, but picked up after someone tossed a few soccer balls onto the field in the back of Broadway Christian Church.  Within minutes, dozens of kids and young men swarm the balls, set up goals and begin to play soccer.  A few young girls guard the goal, while the rest dribble and shoot in the afternoon heat.