Off the Clock

Fridays at 5:20pm

KBIA News brings you a look at the arts and entertainment this week in mid-Missouri.

Hannah Haynes / KBIA

 

Allison Simmons is 13 years old, but she’s been playing video games since she was 7. She meets other gamers online all the time, and she maintains friendships with some of them. But, she said, it’s not so easy to find people her own age that like the game as much as she does.

That’s one of the reasons Allison decided to go to Columbia College’s Girls Who Game event in September. The event was for girls ages 12 to 14 who are interested in gaming and game design. The girls played games in the campus’ “Gaming Hut,” which is also home to the Columbia College eSports team.


Erin McKinstry / KBIA

A couple of decades ago, trash cluttered the banks of the Missouri River.

Tires, alcohol bottles, cigarette butts and plastic interrupted the natural scenery for boaters and proved toxic for wildlife.

But, in recent years, the trash situation has taken a turn for the better. And one mid-Missouri group might have something to do with it.

 


Missouri State Parks

There's a place in the Ozarks where wild horses still roam and where the most adventurous of hikers can wander the wilderness for days.

For those listeners looking for a fall adventure, I took a day trip with my daughter to Missouri’s newest developed state park, Echo Bluff State Park, and brought along a recorder so we could create an audio postcard.


Hunter Gilbert / University of Missouri student

When the University of Missouri left the Big 12 Conference to join the Southeastern Conference, it effectively ended one of the biggest rivalries in college sports.

But, at least one MU club sport is making sure that rivalry lives on.

 


Kristofer Husted / KBIA

Roots N Blues N BBQ celebrated its eleventh anniversary last weekend with headliners like John Prine and Ryan Adams. But the festival wasn’t just about music. 

At this year’s festival, more than 30 different vendors set up shop to sell everything from Midwestern barbecue to handmade jewelry. And countless volunteers and staff members worked behind the scenes to make it happen.

Taylor Coleman was one of those people. She was the craft vendor coordinator this year. Some of the vendors traveled hundreds of miles from other states to sell their merchandise or services at the festival, and it was Coleman’s job to help the vendors in any way she could. 

 


Photo courtesy of Disney, Inc.

I grew up in Mexico City, Mexico. When I was younger, I would watch telenovelas with my friend Fernanda after school. We would both sit on her white, fur rug, our backpacks flung across the room.

For an hour every day, I saw all the women I could be: a ranchera keeping my land safe from a dastardly uncle, a time traveler, a queen. All the possibilities were in front of me.


Erin McKinstry / KBIA

It’s a hot day at Cooper’s Landing.

The Missouri River stretches to the right. A bluegrass band and crickets hum in the background. And people are scattered about listening, drinking beer and fanning away the heat. I glance around for Sara Dykman, who’s just arrived from Jefferson City by bike and who’s heading toward Mexico. I don’t see her, but I do see her bicycle.

The bike is bright pink and loaded down with stuff. Suddenly, Sara appears with a Mr. Pibb in hand, catching me in the middle of snapping photos.

Catherine Wheeler

As Dareth Goettemoeller cleaned up her art space at Orr Street Studios, she hugged a doll.

It was a giant, Raggedy-Anne-like doll, with a message over the heart that read, “Hug me.”

She said she made them for patients that just needed a hug.


Off the Clock - The Rupperts and Their Missouri Winery

May 5, 2017
Erin Schroeder / KBIA

For Regina Ruppert, it’s not easy to separate work and home life. She and her husband, Lee, opened Serenity Valley Winery outside St. Louis in 2006. Since 2011, the winery has been run from their property in Fulton.

“Never in a million years would I have dreamed of this, but the year our daughter graduated...I became an empty nester, turned 50 and had cancer all at the same time," Regina said. "And it wasn't a very good year. And my girlfriends suggested we look into doing this since my husband’s hobby was always winemaking.”

The Museum of Nebraska Art — or MONA — sits on the main drag of the small, central Nebraska town of Kearney. This winter, it has featured work by the state's Latina artists in the first show of its kind.

Alex George / University of Missouri

Alex George is a lawyer by day, and an author by even earlier in the day. The author of six books, including Setting Free the Kites – published by Penguin in February, is also organizing the Unbound Book Festival, in its second year running this April.

The festival will bring acclaimed writer Salman Rushdie, author of such books as Midnight’s Children and The Satanic Verses to Columbia.

George said that as the festival organizer, he was glad to bring someone of Rushdie’s celebrity to Unbound and is excited to see Rushdie in front of an audience.

There’s only one train line left in Concordia, Kansas (population just over 5,000), and it hauls grain. But more than a hundred years ago there were four train lines. Some of them were passenger trains, and in the 1880s, one carried a group of unaccompanied children from New York.

It stopped in nearby Wayne, Kansas, where strangers were waiting to choose the children.

On a bitterly cold afternoon early this winter, Patrick Overton was standing outside the historic Federated Church of Arrow Rock, Missouri, greeting people for the town’s annual folk sing-along. As visitors made their way through the afternoon cold to the warm glow of the church, Overton welcomed old friends, introduced himself to new ones, and joked that it was safe for all to enter because he would not be singing.

Off the Clock - Women Raising Alpacas, Creating Fabric

Mar 23, 2017
Catherine Wheeler / KBIA

Four women own and operate Heartfelt Alpaca Creations in Columbia, Missouri. Three of the women, Mary Licklider, Linda Coats, and Diane Peckham, all brought their alpacas into the business, while Carol Brown is a fiber artists who makes felt sheets. The women started the business about six years ago.

Why alpaca?

Licklider said the best alpaca fiber is as soft as cashmere. Additionally, it's a stronger fiber, but a similar weight.


Andrea Del Sarto / Flickr

What do Julius Caesar and Malcolm X have in common? More than you might think.

During a visit to MU’s Rhynsburger Theater last month, the Acting Company of New York City told the stories of both men in two back-to-back performances on Feb. 18 and 19. Known as “Caesar/X,” the series pairs Marcus Gardley’s new play “X: Or the Nation vs Betty Shabazz” with the Shakespearean classic “Julius Caesar.” Both tell the stories of powerful men who were assassinated by those who knew them best.


Garrett Giles / KBIA

I put two press passes around my neck after getting ready last Saturday morning. I then walked out my door, got in my car, and traveled to downtown Columbia where the True/False Festival was happening. Well, that was after I stopped at the Chick-fil-a off of Stadium Blvd. to get breakfast.

Erin McKinstry / KBIA

The diversity of this year’s Academy Award nominations has not gone unnoticed. In stark contrast to last year, when several prominent people of color boycotted the ceremony because of a lack of diversity, the 2017 picks feature a black nominee in each of the four acting categories and a more diverse set of nominations, from best picture to best documentary.

Brian Maurer, local filmmaker and film studies professor at MU, said the increase in diversity is most likely a reaction to last year’s outcry.

Rebecca Siegel / Flickr

The doors to Gwynn Hall keep locking behind Autumn McLain. She called maintenance, but in the meantime she is stretching to hold both doors open with her body. She is 20 minutes early to the MU Poetry Club meeting.

The group had fizzled out, but McLain and a group of friends brought it back in late January. Their first meeting was small, said McLain, just a few friends meeting in the library. Now, the club has grown to include people from majors including journalism and computer science.


Josh Murray / Office of Undergraduate Studies

National Geographic is well-known for its photography. University of Missouri alumna Sarah Leen was the first female director of photography for the magazine. She recently took time out of her travels to give a keynote address at the 2017 Visual Arts and Design Showcase at her alma mater.

Man Fights Speeding Ticket with Deer Excuse

Jan 27, 2017
Antoine Vasse Nicolas / Flickr

  A Massachusetts man fighting a speeding ticket in court had a unique explanation — the officer's radar gun may have picked up a deer.

The Newburyport Daily News reports that Dennis Sayers, of Haverhill , was clocked going 40 mph in 30 mph zone in West Newbury in November.

He got a $105 ticket.

 


Carter Woodiel

One early September evening British Lord Alan Watson prepared for a ribbon cutting. . He held the scissors and snipped the ribbon at the National Churchill Museum on the campus of Westminster College in Fulton.

Watson and Edwina Sandys, Winston Churchill’s granddaughter, among others, were opening the museum’s newest exhibit: a typed draft of the Iron Curtain speech, hung on frames throughout the room. 

Garrett Giles

The ROTC Cannon, better known as the “Mizzou-ka,” made another appearance at Memorial Stadium at the University of Missouri last Saturday as the Tigers hosted Middle Tennessee State for the university’s 105th homecoming.

Today, the cannon sits in the northeast corner of Farout Field, waiting to be fired off when the Tigers score. One thing has changed for the Mizzou-ka though: It’s louder than it has been for a while.

The Pettis County Museum in Sedalia holds records of all the schools and railroads that have existed in the area. Its collection contains records of Pettis County’s residents who have fought in wars.

The museum also houses Native American artifacts. It’s home to objects that have traveled from Angola to mid-Missouri, given to the museum by a Pettis County woman who was a missionary in Angola.

Sarah Kellogg

Columbia’s annual Roots N Blues N BBQ festival kicks off September 30 at Stephens Lake Park. It is one of the city’s biggest events, where fans can hear a range of live music, try out a variety of barbecued meat and view local artwork all in one location. But one particular kind of artwork has become an interesting staple at Roots N Blues. 

Vinyl records have made a tremendous international comeback in the past five years… And it’s had an impact on the local record industry as well.

Connor Kraus is browsing hundreds of vinyl records inside Columbia’s Hitt Records.

“I’m looking for the new Radiohead album,” Kraus said.

Last week, the MU Department of Romance Languages and Literature hosted an international conference titled: The Afro-Cuban Artists: A Renaissance. The conference brought in artist and scholars from around the world to discuss ideas about Afro-Cuban art. One MU professor spent six years planning and preparing the event.

Professor Juanamaria Cordones-Cook of Romance Languages is excited to finish up her semester and spend three weeks in Cuba. She said she’s traveled there at least 25 times.

“I have lost track of the times,” Cordones-Cook said.

Soul singer Lee Fields has spent four decades performing on stages around the world, including a nearly-sold out show during the 2016 True/False film festival… In a rapidly changing music industry, he’s managed to keep his music and legacy alive.

“I’ve been through about three generations now, and they continue to come and I continue to sing,” Fields said. “So I am very grateful for the supporters.”

Jeremy Schmetterer / KBIA

 Guitarists can become household names in music touring the world… but they wouldn’t be able to do that without their technicians. Although it takes years of experience to master an instrument, the ability to fix a guitar on the spot requires an entirely different sort of understanding.

A man held a guitar broken into two pieces. As he stared hopelessly at the instrument, which fell victim to a small child, Luke Offield saw something he could potentially bring back to life… because he doesn’t see guitars the same way most people do.

Ryan Levi / KBIA

Garrett Bullock’s basement bedroom in his Columbia home is a video gamer’s paradise.

 

Two computer screens rest on a sleek black desk. A big, flat screen TV is mounted on the wall above one of the monitors. Along the wall, dozens of video game cases are meticulously lined up.

 

It’s the kind of place where someone could reasonably play video games for an entire day, which is convenient for Bullock, the president of the Columbia Extra Life Guild.

 

April is Jazz Appreciation Month, or JAM – a holiday that was first recognized in 2002 by the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. JAM is intended to encourage people on all ages to study jazz music, attend concerts and pay tribute to jazz as both a living and historic art form.

Pages