Off the Clock

Fridays at 5:20pm

KBIA News brings you a look at the arts and entertainment this week in mid-Missouri.

Vinyl records have made a tremendous international comeback in the past five years… And it’s had an impact on the local record industry as well.

Connor Kraus is browsing hundreds of vinyl records inside Columbia’s Hitt Records.

“I’m looking for the new Radiohead album,” Kraus said.

Last week, the MU Department of Romance Languages and Literature hosted an international conference titled: The Afro-Cuban Artists: A Renaissance. The conference brought in artist and scholars from around the world to discuss ideas about Afro-Cuban art. One MU professor spent six years planning and preparing the event.

Professor Juanamaria Cordones-Cook of Romance Languages is excited to finish up her semester and spend three weeks in Cuba. She said she’s traveled there at least 25 times.

“I have lost track of the times,” Cordones-Cook said.

Soul singer Lee Fields has spent four decades performing on stages around the world, including a nearly-sold out show during the 2016 True/False film festival… In a rapidly changing music industry, he’s managed to keep his music and legacy alive.

“I’ve been through about three generations now, and they continue to come and I continue to sing,” Fields said. “So I am very grateful for the supporters.”

Jeremy Schmetterer / KBIA

 Guitarists can become household names in music touring the world… but they wouldn’t be able to do that without their technicians. Although it takes years of experience to master an instrument, the ability to fix a guitar on the spot requires an entirely different sort of understanding.

A man held a guitar broken into two pieces. As he stared hopelessly at the instrument, which fell victim to a small child, Luke Offield saw something he could potentially bring back to life… because he doesn’t see guitars the same way most people do.

Ryan Levi / KBIA

Garrett Bullock’s basement bedroom in his Columbia home is a video gamer’s paradise.

 

Two computer screens rest on a sleek black desk. A big, flat screen TV is mounted on the wall above one of the monitors. Along the wall, dozens of video game cases are meticulously lined up.

 

It’s the kind of place where someone could reasonably play video games for an entire day, which is convenient for Bullock, the president of the Columbia Extra Life Guild.

 

April is Jazz Appreciation Month, or JAM – a holiday that was first recognized in 2002 by the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. JAM is intended to encourage people on all ages to study jazz music, attend concerts and pay tribute to jazz as both a living and historic art form.

Rayland Baxter isn’t a household name in music… at least not yet. But those who have heard of the Nashville-native know him to be a world-class singer-songwriter. Baxter stopped in Columbia just two weeks ago to perform at Rose Music Hall during a Midwest tour of his second studio album titled “Imaginary man”.

This week’s Off the Clock is about a band whose story is one that most millennials can relate to… the group’s founding members met on Tinder, a popular mobile dating application where users are prompted with pictures and short biographies. People can “swipe right” if they are interested in the other person, or “swipe left” if they’re not. In January 2014, former MU students Morgan Manson and Luke Dierker both swiped right.

 When the theatre curtain rises, an audience watched a world created through a seamless blend of costumes, lights, sounds and actors. But look past what’s on stage, and you’ll find the finger prints of technicians and artisans, many of whom you’ll never directly see. KBIA’s Annie Rees went behind the scenes of the MU theatre department’s production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead to learn about the process of putting on a play. 

This week’s edition of Off the Clock is a story about three high school friends from the north suburbs of Chicago who started their 2013 freshman year at MU unlike most students. They arrived in Columbia and started posting flyers in search for a drummer. Ari Shellist, Tyler Stock and Jack Pritchett played together in a high school band for two years, and this time they were looking for the final member of their new group.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of AXA Equitable, 2012

Every year, busloads of fourth graders from around the state of Missouri are dropped off in Jefferson City and taken through the State Capitol. All of those grade schoolers are brought into the House Lounge where the walls are covered with Thomas Hart Benton’s “Social History of Missouri” mural.

You may not recognize his name, but you probably would recognize his face. Larry Miller has made hundreds of appearances in television and film. KBIA’s Steve Dawson talked to Miller about his beginnings as a comic in New York City, and how he met one of his closest friends, Jerry Seinfeld.

Miller said he saw Seinfeld perform for the first time at a New York City club, but didn’t have a chance to introduce himself that night.

MU Robotics Club Prepares for Spring Battle

Dec 13, 2015

 Flames, blades and spears are just a few of the weapons a fighting robot can weild. Add on top of that the challenge of building robots to defend against these attacks and the possibilities of what can happen in a robot battle are endless.


New App Hopes to Change Classroom Culture

Dec 10, 2015
Ross Terrell/ KBIA

  If you’ve been in a college lecture hall, you know that students checking their phones in class is a common occurrence.


Off the Clock - HungerU Makes a Trip to the Midwest

Oct 16, 2015
Emma Nicolas/ KBIA

  There are more than 795 million people hungry globally according to the Global Food Security Index. HungerU is trying to change that. Its large tour bus treks from campus to campus getting college students involved in the fight to stop hunger.

HungerU’s huge blue and black trailer has visited more than 65 college campuses across the U.S. since its mission first started three years ago. This year will be the group’s seventh tour, and first time visiting the Midwest.

Off the Clock: A Brief History Lesson with David McCullough

Oct 9, 2015
Riley Beggin/ KBIA

Pulitzer-prize winning historian David McCullough spoke Wednesday evening at the Missouri Theatre on the lessons to be learned from the founding fathers. McCullough’s lecture marked the opening of the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy, which supports the study of the American democratic tradition at MU.

McCullough has written biographies on historical figures like John Adams, Harry Truman, Theodore Roosevelt and—most recently—the Wright Brothers. In addition to his Pulitzers, he has been awarded the National Book Award and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The Roots N' Blues N' BBQ Festival entered its ninth year and third at Stephen's Lake Park. This year the festival had a record number of vendors and saw the likes of Buddy Guy, Brandi Carlile and Dwight Yoakam grace their stages.

Last weekend, I spent some time at the festival talking to festival goers about their favorite artists and vendors and asking what advice they would give to first timers. This week, on Off the Clock, listen to some of the sounds of the weekend. Enjoy the audio postcard from the 2015 Roots N' Blues festival.


Off the Clock: Razia Hutchins’ I am For Peace Movement

Sep 25, 2015

  Razia Hutchins grew up in Chicago, around violence. After hearing about a young man being murdered outside a high school basketball game, Hutchins decided it was her turn to make a change.


The City of Columbia participated in Parking Day for the second year in a row. The idea for Parking Day was started in 2005 in San Francisco and has since turned into an international event. GetAbout Columbia Outreach Coordinator Janet Godon said this event was about interaction more than anything else. Multiple businesses took place in the event downtown. An arts and crafts tent, bocce court, park benches and live music were all available for entertainment. 

Off the Clock: Faith Voices, a discussion on race

Apr 24, 2015

Racial tension sparked civil unrest in Ferguson after the death of Michael Brown last August, bringing the issue of racial profiling of African American males by police officers to the forefront. Members of Faith Voices for Jefferson City believe the larger conversation of racial profiling in Missouri is long overdue. In January, members of Faith Voices for Jefferson City and local faith leaders embarked on a yearlong conversation on race at Quinn Chapel AME Church. One of the goals was to create an open discussion on race between African American residents and Caucasian residents rather than segregating it in the comfort of their homes.


Jenn Cooper / KBIA

This week KBIA’s arts and culture segment producer Jenn Cooper hung out with the Columbia Jazz Jam group to explore Columbia’s Jazz scene during April’s Jazz Appreciation Month.


Off the Clock: The Sassy I-70 Signs and the Woman Responsible for Them

Apr 10, 2015
MoDOT
File photo / MoDot

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment, KBIA’s Abigail Keel chats with Linda Wilson Horn, the woman who writes the sassy messages on the Missouri Department of Transportation’s Dynamic Message signs along I-70. 

Amazon

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA reporter Jason Hoffman sat down with local author, George Hodgman. His memoir Bettyville discusses some of the issues faced caring for an elderly parent as well as those of being gay in small town America.

Here’s the full-length interview: 


Columbia-based novelist Keija Parssinen’s first book, The Ruins of Us, was a Columbia One Read selection in 2013. The novel centered is around a crumbling marriage between an American expat and her Saudi billionaire husband. Parssinen’s new novel, The Unraveling of Mercy Louis, is set closer to home: it takes place in a small Texas refinery town that grows increasingly zealous in its attempts to control its population of teenage girls. The town’s paranoia builds toward an outbreak of mass hysteria and a modern-day witch trial. Parssinen spoke with KBIA about the research behind her new book; she began by comparing the Saudi Arabia of her first book with the Texas town she describes in her new novel.


Off the Clock: New Ownership, New Changes at Columbia's Blue Note

Mar 27, 2015
Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

Other than the Missouri Theatre — the Blue Note and Rose Music Hall, formerly known as Mojo’s — are two of the most established concert venues in not only Columbia, but in Mid-Missouri.

For the past 34 years, the venues grew up and flourished under the supervision of one person — Richard King. However, at the tail end of last year, King sold the spaces to the owners of the Majestic Theatre in Madison, Wisconsin. While the sale wasn’t necessarily unexpected, it did prompt many venue-goers to wonder what would happen to the cherished institution — mostly — what changes, if any, would be visible.


In this recent series of commentaries for KBIA.org, Missouri student journalists recount a few of life’s confusing lessons. Led by Missouri School of Journalism Professor and storytelling master Berkley Hudson, these 9 student commentators took not only pen to paper but also got in front of the microphone, to talk out these essays that touch on life, relationships, sticky situations and coming of age, among other issues. Enjoy!

Phil Gold / Flickr

Warning: do not listen to this story if you are hungry.  In what started as a simple craving for good Mexican food, KBIA producers Meredith Turk and John Farmer de la Torre discovered a small, but active group of tamale makers in Columbia, Missouri.   In fact, they stumbled upon the biggest Mexican tamale-making day of the year.  For this story, our sources only wanted us to use first names.

 


Jadde Turk / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment, Off the Clock, Jadde Turk takes us to the Hallsville Community Center. She tells us about the growing popularity of square dancing in the small town. Every other Saturday, the Missouri Traditional Fiddle and Dance Network invites community members to eat and enjoy the traditional music and dance of Mid-Missouri. 


Ashley Reese / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, Ashley Reese hangs out at the Orr Street Studios with local art students and teachers for the exhibit, Under the Influence.

 

 

Kenzie Dill / KBIA

This week on KBIA’s arts/culture segment Off the Clock, KBIA’s Kenzie Dill spent time at the Discount Mattress Outlet, located on Interstate 70 Drive. From the outside, you’d never guess that this mattress store was also home to a dance studio.

Every Tuesday and Thursday night, the mattresses are put away and a dance floor is revealed.


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