Columbia Faith and Values

Weekends

Kellie Moore brings us an update from the Faith & Values desk.  This program is a collaboration between KBIA and Columbia FAVS.

Church holds active shooter training

May 25, 2013
KBIA

 

When Michael Hestir visited Alive in Christ Lutheran Church earlier this month, he wasn't there to worship. He was there to help churchgoers prepare for a possible emergency.

Hestir, a sergeant of the Columbia Police Department, has been going to churches around Boone County for the past five years to raise awareness on church violence and how to act.

In the past decade, America has seen an increase in people coming into church buildings and taking lives.

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS.com / KBIA

There are enough former Catholics in the United States to make up a large Christian denomination of their own.

According to the Religious Landscape Survey conducted by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life in 2008, one in 10 American adults identifies as an ex-Catholic. And of the 25 percent of American adults who are still Catholic, only one in four attend mass regularly.

Kearston Winrow/ColumbiaFAVS.com / KBIA

  The American Humanist Association is demanding that weekly prayer sessions at Fayette High School be stopped on grounds that they are unconstitutional. 

Photo courtesy Porsha Williams

Porsha Williams knows a thing or two about walls – metaphorical ones, that is. She’s been up against a lot of them, whether religious, psychological or cultural.

She describes herself as a “raised Christian, converted to Pagan woman.” And that conversion is the source of many of these walls.

Williams has always been intrigued with Kemeticism, an ancient Egyptian form of Paganism. But it wasn’t until about three and a half years ago that she decided to start practicing it.

Evan Townsend/ColumbiaFAVS.com / KBIA

This story was produced in partnership with Columbia FAVS

The band of LifeBridge Lutheran Church practices in the community room of an apartment complex each Sunday morning before service begins. Furniture is piled in the corner to their left, and gym equipment in the corner to the right. Though they don’t have their own building to worship in, it’s progress for LifeBridge – a year ago, the church didn’t even exist.

This story was produced in partnership with Columbia Faith & Values. Find more stories like this one at ColumbiaFAVS.com. You can get instant updates each day on Facebook and Twitter.

Hans Neumann recalls days in Hitler Youth

Apr 20, 2013
Meredith Turk / KBIA

This story was produced in partnership with Columbia Faith & Values (ColumbiaFAVS.com).

Hans Neumann was raised in a small, forested village in East Prussia, just five miles from the Lithuanian border. He was forced to leave his home at the age of 15, near the end of World War II. Germany was losing, and Russian troops were moving west. 

Evan Townsend / KBIA

This segment was produced in partnership with Columbia Faith & Values. Find more news like this at ColumbiaFAVS.com. 

Two people with remarkable stories to share came to MU this week, and we hear from both of them in this faith and values update. Romain-Roland Levi shared his experiences in Belgium during World War II, and Rajmohan Gandhi, grandson of Mohatma Gandhi, talked about his grandfather, along with the India-Pakistan conflict.

Holocaust survivor lives to spread love

Kate Grumke/ColumbiaFAVS.com / KBIA

This story was produced in partnership with Columbia Faith & Values. Find more stories like this one at ColumbiaFAVS.com.

 

On a Sunday morning at Wilkes Boulevard United Methodist Church in Columbia, about 30 people sing to welcome two new members to their congregation.

John Flaim is one of the newcomers. He came to Wilkes about five months ago.

Druid community works to form new church

Mar 30, 2013
Evan Townsend / KBIA

Cicyfarth and four other members of the White Hawthorne Protogrove talk over food at a restaurant in downtown Columbia, planning their ritual to recognize the spring equinox.

These five have been meeting periodically for sandwiches and fellowship for nearly half a year. They are neo-druids, people who draw on a multitude of pantheons to find positive ethics, natural harmony, and spiritual connection. Since the fall of 2012, Cicyfarth and the others have been fighting to become a church.

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS.com / KBIA

This story was produced in partnership with Columbia Faith & Values. 

When the world called, William Claassen said "Yes." 

The Columbia author has hitchhiked across North America, worked on a kibbutz in Israel and 

He recently published his third book, "Journey Man: A World Calling." The book tells of his travels through nine countries on four continenets over a 30-years span.

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS.com / KBIA

On Wednesday, the Cardinals of the Catholic church elected Jorge Mario Borgeglio of Argentina to be the new pope. He’s the first pope from South America, and the first from the Jesuit order of priests. He’s also the first to choose the name Francis.

We spent part of Wednesday and Thursay at Fr. Tolton Catholic High School in Columbia to find out what some of Columbia's young Catholics think of the new pope. 

Like many other people, Corrine Hubbard admires his humility.

FAVS photo courtesy Clyde Ruffin

Community and campus converge in the cast of MU's production of "The Amen Corner," a play by James Baldwin that finishes its run this weekend. 

The play tells the story of an African-American woman who starts a small storefront church in Harlem in 1965. She's recently migrated there from the south with her 18-year-old son, who plays the church piano.

But unbeknownst to the congregation, she has a secret past. She was once married to a jazz musician who was an alcoholic, but after their child died, she left him. His arrival one Sunday sends a scandal through the church. 

Photo courtesy Lana Wilson and Martha Shane.

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

Photo courtesy Amy Gearhardt

In some Christian denominations, it’s getting more common to see women preaching from the pulpit on Sunday mornings. Still, it’s a slow cultural shift – some denominations don’t allow female pastors, and many churches that do are just getting female pastors for the first time. All that’s to say that being a clergy woman has its own set of challenges – and those challenges come into play on the dating scene. 

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS / KBIA

Awareness of death can lead people to strengthen and defend their own religious beliefs, according to a recent psychological study led by MU researcher Kenneth Vail. 

And that doesn't just apply to those who believe in a higher power already.  

The foundation of Vail's researcg comes from the idea that part of the motivation for religious belief is the awareness of death – an idea that has deep philosophical roots, Vail said. Recent experimental research also points to the notion that people use belief to help manage awareness of mortality. 

Kellie Kotraba / ColumbiaFAVS

About 40 protestors gathered today in response to MU's possible hire of Larry James, a former psychologist at Guantanamo Bay, for a high-ranking position in the College of Education.

Note:  KBIA's faith and values desk is trying something new. Each week, we'll bring you a quick look at the religion news happening all over the state. Here's our first Midweek Missouri faith fix. 

On the Columbia faith front, there's quite a conversation going about faith in the workplace -- and a lot of "out" atheists have jumped right in.

Photo courtesy of Jimi and Cristi Cook

It's one thing to say you'll go on a big volunteer trip. But doing it? That seems much harder. Just ask Jimi and Cristi Cook. 

The Cooks are the co-founders and directors of Be the Change Volunteers, an organization that coordinates trips to impoverished countries around the world to build schools. It's the kind of volunteer effort the Cooks refer to as "the big one" – the kind that takes people out of their comfort zones. 

Columbia mosque faces imam shortage and funding challenges

Jan 5, 2013
Ryan Schuessler, ColumbiaFAVS / KBIA

Since 2008, the Islamic Center of Central Missouri has been without an imam – a central community leader in Islam. Although Columbia’s Muslim community has found ways to stay active, it is without a formally trained spiritual leader.

Imams lead prayers, serve as religious scholars and assist with weddings and lectures, among other things.

Without an imam, “You won’t have someone who you can ask questions to frequently,” mosque Secretary Rafa Nizam said. “The access to knowledge might not be as easy.”

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS.com / KBIA

Some monasteries make jelly, creamed honey, even world-class beer.

Kellie Kotraba\ColumbiaFAVS / KBIA

Atheism is not usually considered a faith -- so why has our faith and values desk covered it? In this week's update, we bring you an answer.

Greg Lammers, the atheist writer for Columbia Faith & Values and the organizer for Columbia Atheists, sat down with Kellie Kotraba to talk about atheism, values and the relationship between the two. 

You can also listen to the full 10-minute interview below:

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS / KBIA

In this week's faith and values update, we hear from Kelsey Gillespy, the Catholic writer for Columbia Faith and values. She just finished a made-at-home documentary called "This Little Light," which aims to dispel misconceptions about Christianity – some of which she used to have herself, even though she grew up Christian. 

Small-town Orthodoxy brings diverse group together

Dec 1, 2012
Ryan Schuessler\ColumbiaFAVS.com / KBIA

Columbia’s Orthodox Christian community is growing – at least, that’s what churchgoers say it feels like.

*Clarification: The audio version of this story contains misleading information about the church's connection to the Great Schism of 1054. The church was among five patriarchates dating from the third century, and the schism was a time of separation -- the Roman Church split from the other four -- not a time of origin.

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS

Happy Thanksgiving – that’s one holiday greeting you hear at this time of year that’s not part of a specific faith tradition.

The idea of giving thanks transcends religious, social and cultural boundaries. Thanks can be expressed in any language or tradition.

And that’s just what happened Sunday at an Interfaith Thanksgiving Service. Christians, Muslims and Jews, Baha'is, Buddhists and Hindus, and people from several other faith traditions came together to share. Beliefs and languages converged as sounds of thanksgiving and peace rose through the air.

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS

The role of religious affiliation in the United States is changing.

According to a recent survey from the Pew Forum, one in five Americans is not affiliated with any religion

A small part of this growing group is made up of atheists.

Last weekend, hundreds of atheists gathered in the Bible Belt – Springfield, to be exact – for Skepticon, a national skeptics convention. Not all skeptics are atheists, but many of them are.

Photo by Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS

The presidential election is just a few days away, but that’s not what this week's faith and values update is about. 

Instead, we’re going to talk about something that was making news about 500 years ago in Germany: The Protestant Reformation. This past Wednesday was Reformation Day – the anniversary of the day in 1517 when the movement began.

Laura Davison\ColumbiaFAVS / KBIA

Columbia’s Hispanic population is growing, and so are opportunities for worship in Spanish.

The majority of Columbia Hispanics are still Catholic, but a Pentecostal congregation and the the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are among those reaching out by ministering in Spanish.

Laura Davison\ColumbiaFAVS / KBIA

 

Columbia’s Hispanic population is growing, and so are opportunities for worship in Spanish.

The majority of Columbia Hispanics are still Catholic, but a Pentecostal congregation and the the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are among those reaching out by ministering in Spanish.

Kellie Kotraba/ColumbiaFAVS

Craig Roberts teaches plant science at the University of Missouri. But he also has another passion: music. He’s spent the past few years helping with a new project – a book of Christian hymns entitled “Psalms, Hymns and Spiritual Songs.” If you appreciate poetry, there’s a good chance you’ll like this.

Looking at the big picture, hymns have always been an important part of church life -- at least, according to Mark Noll. He teaches history at Notre Dame University. He’s also co-edited books on the history of hymns in American Protestantism. 

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