Exam

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Education issues in mid-Missouri.

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KBIA

In the past, alternative schools have been associated with their negative reputations. It’s typically understood as the place where the “bad kids” go. However, from the outside looking in, Frederick Douglass High School looks like the average school. But the reality is Douglass is not a typical school. It’s an alternative school. However, the school’s non-traditional approach to student learning started to catch wind. Douglass has broken down the barrier of stereotypes with the help of a cooking class and a teacher.

True/False

The True/False Film Fest wrapped up last week, bringing filmgoers from around the world to celebrate the year’s newest documentaries. The festival, which is in its 12 th year, brings the intimate and harsh truths of storytelling to life. Although the festival mainly focuses on the films and their directors, local high school students were given the opportunity to dive into one of Columbia's richest traditions. KBIA's Marissanne Lewis-Thompson spoke with the festivals education director Polina...

EXAM: New MU Provost Focuses on Title IX Policies and Teacher Salaries

Mar 2, 2015
Andy Humphrey / KBIA

Newly hired University of Missouri Provost Garnett Stokes comes to her new position with many plans to improve the university’s academic programs. Stokes led as provost and executive vice president at Florida State University and handled many situations involving Title IX regulations, teacher salaries, and research achievement. As KBIA’s Andy Humphrey tells us, Stokes believes that she can use her prior experience to help solve various issues at MU.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

Nine high school students from Columbia, Jefferson City, Boonville and Osage Beach competed in this year’s central Missouri regional Poetry Out Loud competition at the Daniel Boone Regional Library last week. Hickman High School student Shakira Cross recited the poem “Grief” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning as she gestures freely with her hands and arms.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

Nine high school students from Columbia, Jefferson City, Boonville and Osage Beach competed in this year’s central missouri regional Poetry Out Loud competition at the Daniel Boone Regional Library last week. KBIA’s Hope Kirwan talked with the students, their teachers and parents about why this competition is about more than just reciting verse.

EXAM: MU’s Title IX Policies Cause Headaches and Confusion for Faculty and Staff

Feb 16, 2015
Adam Procter / flickr

In October, University of Missouri Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin sent out a mass email to students, faculty and staff explaining faculty and staff are mandatory reporters of any form of discrimination under new Title IX policies. For many of these new mandatory reporters, their new responsibilities have caused some confusion and concern. An online training program was launched a few months after the initial announcement to try to help clear the air. But, the training has caused its own confusion and headaches as well.

Kyle Norris / KBIA

For the past ten years, Columbia Public Schools has continued to see an increase in total enrollment, adding about 150 students every year. Despite this growth, the school district has tried to maintain the same class size, turning to trailers to add more classrooms. KBIA’s Kyle Norris tells us how the school district hopes to move away from this temporary fix by creating a more permanent space for growing classes.

The University of Missouri is known for it’s School of Journalism. Every year, hundreds of freshmen from across the country come to school at MU to learn about news or sports broadcasting. But KBIA’s Jason Hoffman found one freshman who’s career in sports radio has an added challenge: He's blind.

ipad, student
Brad Flickinger / Flickr

By the year 2021, every student in the Columbia Public Schools (CPS) district from fifth grade on will have a personal electronic device. “This year we started one to one in all of our fifth grade classes with iPad minis. So, our fifth grade kids and students are learning to kind of digitize their curriculum and next year they will be sixth graders, and so we’ll give another group of fifth graders iPads and it’ll continue on their way up,” CPS Coordinator of Instructional Technology Julie Nichols said.

school, music
Ashley Reese / KBIA

We conclude our three part series called A Teachable Moment, which looks at how events in Ferguson are being talked about in St. Louis-area classrooms and schools. Later on in the show, we’ll hear how small grants awarded to teachers in Columbia Public Schools can make a big difference in the classroom.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

This week, we continue our series called A Teachable Moment, which looks at how issues related to Ferguson are being discussed in area classrooms. Later on in the show, we’ll hear how Missouri’s Common Core rewrite may not produce education standards that are very different from the current standards.

Alberto G. / Flickr

Since September, parents, educators and business leaders have been working to try to rewrite the Common Core standards. Missouri first adopted Common Core in 2010 and is one of 45 states using the national standards for grades K-12. So far, the committees in charge of rewriting Common Core have had meetings full of heated arguments and lots of confusion as they try to prepare a recommendation for the Board of Education by October 2015. I spoke with Dr. Barbara Reys, Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum at MU, about why these committees may not be able to make the best decisions about education in Missouri.

This week, we are beginning a series that profiles how issues raised by events in Ferguson intersect with what's happening in area classrooms. As the months have passed since protests erupted following the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, s ome educators are beginning to weave Ferguson into their lesson plans. In St. Louis, that often means talking about race in a region with deep racial and socio-economic divides. St. Louis Public Radio's Tim Lloyd reports on how some educators have...

Ashley Reese / KBIA

It’s harvest time in Mid-Missouri and students at some Columbia Public Schools are getting the opportunity to learn about the science behind their favorite foods. These new lessons are thanks to a partnership with the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture.

Jason Hoffman / KBIA

Title IX and the prevalence of sexual violence on college campuses have been national concerns over the past year. We'll take a look at what inspired lawmakers and school administrators take action against sexual assault on campus and hear how their efforts may not be what's best for students.

Columbia College
File Photo / KBIA

Scott Dalrymple began serving as the president of Columbia College last May. KBIA’s Liying Qian caught up with Dalrymple after a presentation he gave last month, to discuss his first few months as president.

Timothy Maylander / KBIA

Since his arrival at the University of Missouri last February, Chancellor Bowen Loftin has inspired several changes. He recently announced a voluntary separation program that could serve as an incentive for retirement for tenured faculty members. KBIA’s Ashley Reese talked with several MU professors about why this program might encourage some of the university’s best professors to leave.

School playground shadow
/ Dreamstime

Morgan County R-2 School District has finalized plans for a new auditorium that will double as a safe room for tornadoes. KBIA’s Marissanne Lewis-Thompson tells us the district will use a grant from the Missouri State Emergency Management Agency ( SEMA) to help finance the project.

chinese language matching game
Heather Adams / KBIA

Foreign languages classes are highly encouraged for high school students in Missouri, and many colleges require them for admission. French, German, Spanish, Latin, Japanese and Chinese are all offered to students at Columbia Public Schools. KBIA’s Heather Adams explores how students pick the language they're going to learn. In May of 1970, the Ohio National Guard shot and killed four students who were protesting the Vietnam War at Kent State University. The Kent State shootings set off a wave...

edward dowd
Rickelle Pimentel / KBIA

The University of Missouri System Board of Curators held a press conference Friday aftern­oon to discuss a report investigating MU's handling of the Sasha Menu Courey case.

Because of a dispute over how much money to put in this year's supplemental budget, Gov. Jay Nixon has cut $22 million from public schools and higher education. Nixon, a Democrat, announced Thursday that he's cutting $15.6 million from the current budget for K-12 schools, $3.2 million from community colleges, and $3.2 million from four-year institutions. He says he asked lawmakers for $44.1 million in additional funding for education in this year's supplemental budget (HB 2014) to make up...

Municipal elections are Tuesday, and there are a few education issues on the ballot. Paul Cushing, Jonathan Sessions, Joseph Toepke and Helen Wade are the four candidates running for three spots on the Columbia school board. Voters in Hallsville and Sturgeon face similar races for their school boards, and in Ashland, eight candidates are running for three vacant school board seats. The Harrisburg school district is asking for a $2 million bond issue for security and technology improvements.

joplin high school
ICSC

The Minority Achievement Committee, or MAC Scholars, is a national program that supports academic achievement and community involvement for minority students. The nine programs in the Columbia Public School District encourage students to look to positive role models, whether they're in the community or another continent. KBIA’s Hope Kirwan caught up with the scholars at Lange Middle School at their recent tribute to Nelson Mandela, the former South African President and activist.

girl scout cookie cash box
Margaux Henquinet / KBIA

We often think of the business world as a world that belongs to adults—adults in suits moving money with the shake of a hand and the dash of a signature on a contract. But this week, we're taking a look at some unexpected ways kids are becoming entrepreneurs.

classroom
Håkan Dahlström / Flickr

First, KBIA's Hope Kirwan takes us to a classroom in Jefferson City for a new kind of parent-teacher conference—these are led by the students. The classic parent-teacher conference is a good way to evaluate a student’s progress, but 4th graders at Jefferson City’s South Elementary get to take the lead and tell their parents what they've learned. The Columbia Public School District is looking for a new superintendent, and now, the search has been narrowed down to two finalists. Dr. Dred Scott...

True/False

Documentary film has been very prominent in Columbia in the past few weeks. The 11 th True/False Film Festival ended Sunday, and a new documentary film program was recently added to the Missouri School of Journalism. This edition focuses on documentary film and its presence in education and students’ lives.

bowen loftin
George Varney / KBIA

Former University of Missouri football player Michael Sam came out as gay earlier this month. He came out to his teammates last August—that season, he also became the SEC Defensive Player of the Year, and helped lead the Tigers to a 12-2 record. Now, Sam could be the first openly gay player in the NFL.

Camille Phillips / KBIA

High school is right around the corner for eighth graders, and for those in Jefferson City, a new academy system will be waiting for them. The district’s eighth graders are in the process of selecting and applying for academies for next school year. The students have the options of choosing from seven academies: Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources; Human Services; Industrial and Engineering Technology; Health Services; Fine Arts and Communication; Business, Management and Technology; and...

JEFFERSON CITY -- From the start of Monday’s six-hour session considering a variety of ways to help struggling schools, the head of the Missouri board of education emphasized that the state is concerned about long-range, broad-based policy, not the operations of individual districts. But as board members heard a number of presentations on suggested reforms, the talk returned time and again to the current transfers out of unaccredited school districts and the impact on the students who live...

Marshall Griffin / St. Louis Public Radio

A study released Thursday by the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry states that Missouri is "falling behind" when it comes to providing digital learning for K-12 students. The chamber commissioned the study, which was conducted by the Colorado-based Evergreen Education Group . Chamber President and CEO Dan Mehan says although online learning options are available in the Show-Me State, most require tuition, while those that don’t are limited geographically. “If we hope to keep pace with...

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