Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure and Casey Morell, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

india-vote
Altaf Qadri / AP Photo

India — the world's biggest democracy — just concluded the largest general election in history. Over 537 million votes were cast over the past month, and voters decided to elect a new government. The opposition Bharatiya Janata Party, led by Narendra Modi, won the most votes overall, capturing 31 percent of the vote. The Indian Congress Party, led by Rahul Gandhi, came in a distant second, garnering just over 19 percent of the vote. Based on the results, the BJP picked up a total of 282 seats in the lower house of Parliament, the Lok Sahba.

european-parliament
European Parliament / Audiovisual Services for Media

You’re probably well aware that every country has a parliament or a legislature of some sort. But, did you know that Europe, as a whole, also has its own parliament? The European Parliament is part of the European Union, and next week, people in EU member states will go to the polls to elect their representatives. We preview the upcoming elections, talk about the potential rise of more far-right parties making a name on the European stage, and walk you through how the European Parliament works.

Our guests:

world-cup-delays
Denis Ferreira Netto / AP Photo

This week, our focus turns to Brazil. The country is set to be in the international spotlight this summer as the World Cup comes to Brazil. But not everyone in the country is pleased with what else comes with the responsibilities of putting on one of the world's largest sporting events. Protests took place last summer during a World Cup warm-up tournament, with demonstrators expressing anger over the amount of money being spent to bring the games to Brazil.

russia-pipeline
Sergei Karpukhin, Pool / Associated Press

This week, we're looking at the increasingly complex state of energy politics in Eastern Europe. Conflicts between Russia, which supplies much of the region's natural gas, and its neighbors are escalating. The United States government has increased sanctions on the Russian energy sector in response to the country's actions in Crimea and the Ukraine. How have markets been reacting to this? What does it mean for the area's balance of power?

Joining us this week:

unclos-protestors-ap
Aaron Favila / AP Photo

We’re all familiar with border disputes on land … but what about those on the water? Maritime disputes in the Arctic and in the South China Sea are increasing, as countries vie for valuable natural resources beneath the ocean’s waves. Current international law sets strict guidelines on what economic rights countries have off their coasts. But, is the system in place the best one? Is the International Law of the Sea still sufficient today?

A roundtable with Pakistani journalists

Apr 17, 2014
pakistani-journalists-church
Kari Paul / Global Journalist

This week, we're looking at journalism in Pakistan. The country remains a treacherous place for journalists to do their jobs. In the past three weeks, two different explosive devices have been found at the home of a television journalist in Peshawar, a city in northern Pakistan. Reporters Without Borders has described the country as "long the world’s deadliest country for media personnel."

What's next in Crimea?

Apr 10, 2014
Max Vetrov / Associated Press

This week, we take another look at the escalating conflict in Crimea, and what it means for the rest of Eastern Europe.

Global Journalist

João Vale de Almeida is the Ambassador of the European Union to the United States of America. He sat down with Global Journalist's Jason McLure to discuss the crisis in Ukraine, the EU-U.S. relationship, and other topics. Below are excerpts from that interview, but you can listen to the whole interview above, or watch a video of it at the bottom of this page.

Global Journalist

João Vale de Almeida is the Ambassador of the European Union to the United States of America. He sat down with Global Journalist's Jason McLure to discuss the crisis in Ukraine, the EU-U.S. relationship, and other topics. You can watch the interview below:

Laurence Geai / NurPhoto/NurPhoto/Corbis/APImages

The Central African Republic may not be a country on everyone's radar, but for the past two and a half years, it has been the scene of a bloody conflict that's left thousands dead and tens of thousands more displaced.

The state of free press in Myanmar

Mar 27, 2014
aung san suu kyi
Allison Wrabel / Global Journalist

Earlier this month, journalists and scholars attended a conference on free press issues in Yangon, Myanmar (formerly Rangoon, Burma). Just a few short years ago, holding such a conference in such a place would be considered unthinkable: a military junta ruled the country, and the state of journalism in Myanmar was considered to be oppressive at best.

Such investigations are the work of groups like Human Rights Watch's emergencies team, commonly shortened to "e-team." On this week's show, we talk to the directors of the documentary E-TEAM, who followed four investigators as they carried out their work. We also talk to one member of the e-team about his work in Syria. 

An economic crisis in a country with one of the highest murder rates in the world has led to a month of sometimes violent demonstrations in Venezuela. Polarization between supporters and opponents of President Nicolás Maduro's leftist government has left little room for compromise.

After Egyptian coup, space for journalists tightens

Mar 8, 2014

Egypt's prosecution of four Al Jazeera journalists has spotlighted the country's worsening press climate since the military overthrew former president Mohammed Morsi in July. As tension builds ahead of upcoming presidential elections, press freedoms and democratic rights are disappearing amidst a crackdown on Islamists.

Joe Callander / Life After Death

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide. It’s estimated that roughly 800,000 Rwandans were killed in that three month period. Kwasa Liste Munson is the son of one of those victims. He’s the subject of the new documentary Life After Death, which premieres this week at the True/False film festival. 
Frank May / Associated Press

With the Winter Olympics underway, the world’s attention is now focused on the Russian resort city of Sochi.
Wason Wanichakorn / Associated Press

Earlier this month protesters took to the streets of Bangkok, blocking polling sites in an apparent move to disrupt the country’s general election. 
Stephen Wandera / Associated Press

On Dec. 20, Uganda’s parliament passed a bill that imposes harsh punishments for homosexual acts in the country. The bill makes it a crime to promote same-sex relationships and allows some acts to be punishable by life in prison. An earlier version included the death penalty in some instances. 

Efrem Lukatsky / Associated Press

For over two months, demonstrators have gathered in Kiev’s central Independence Square to voice their frustration with the government. What began as a peaceful rally in support of Ukrainian integration into the EU intensified following a brutal police crackdown. 

For over two decades photojournalist Carol Guzy has traveled the world, capturing breathtaking images of sorrow and joy, destruction and rebirth.

For more than two decades, Aye Aye Win has provided the world with an inside glimpse into life in Myanmar, filing stories for the Associated Press in the country formerly known as Burma. In that time, she’s covered protests, natural disasters, and the rapid push towards democracy in recent years.
Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

Last year, former Army private Bradley Manning, now known as Chelsea Manning, was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. The sentence, which is the longest ever imposed in a leak case in the U.S., is amplifying the debate over the Obama administration’s prosecution of government employees who leak classified information to the public. 

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

After nearly 50 years of military rule, the country officially known as Myanmar has slowly emerged from its near-lifetime of isolation and repression. Since 2011, the country has opened up to the international community and instituted a number of political reforms, including the release of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. In 2012 the government ended its policy of media censorship.

Eraldo Peres / Associated Press

November 15 is a big day for Brazil. It’s celebrated as the Proclamation of the Republic, when Brazilian army officers overthrew Emperor Dom Pedro and the monarchy came to an end. So it seems fitting that on Nov. 15 this year, on Brazil’s independence day, the country’s biggest corruption case came to an end.

Axel Heimken / Associated Press

For decades, investigative journalists have worked tirelessly to unearth stories on government wrongdoing, corporate malfeasance, and other issues that provide a better understanding of the world around us, and hopefully, spark change. 

Esteban Felix / Associated Press

China has dramatically increased its economic influence in Latin America. The United States is still the region’s largest investor, but China is now in second place and gaining a larger market share. In 2009, for example, China loaned a Brazilian oil company $10 billion and built a cellphone factory in Venezuela. The next year, China signed a $10 billion deal for the construction of railroads in Argentina. And in March, Ecuador agreed to auction off one-third of the country's Amazonian rainforest to Chinese oil companies.
Muzaffar Salman / Associated Press

This week, we'll revisit two of our favorite interviews from the past year.

Casey Morell / Global Journalist

The 9th of November is an important day in German history, for both highs and lows. It's the day the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, and it's the day the German states became a republic in 1918 before the end of World War I.

However, November 9 is also the anniversary of Kristallnacht –  the night of broken glass. On that night in 1938, the Nazis led riots through the cities of Germany. Jewish owned businesses were ransacked; their storefronts defaced with graffiti; their windows smashed. Nearly 30,000 Jews were arrested that night alone, and sent to concentration camps throughout the Reich. Historians widely consider Kristallnacht to be one of the first major events in the run-up to the Holocaust.

Joseph Schatz / Associated Press

Zambia is one of the world’s richest nations, as long as you measure wealth by natural resources. 
David Von Blohn / Associated Press

Chile’s presidential election takes place on Sunday. The two leading candidates are both daughters of generals who were once friends in the Chilean Air Force. But the similarities end there. 

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