Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.


For more than 20 months, the world watched as the five permanent members of the UN Security Council and Germany hammered out a deal with Iran regarding its nuclear program. On this edition of Global Journalist, we take a look at the lessons learned in the global effort to halt the spread of nuclear weapons.

Magali Girardin / EPA

Eritrea is sometimes described as "the North Korea of Africa." And it's a deserved title.

Courtesy photo

You see them on the battlefields patrolling the front lines and risking their lives.

But they are not soldiers, at least not in the traditional sense. They’re war correspondents. These brave men and women travel to the most dangerous parts of the globe, all for the story.

For many journalists, covering one war is enough. But there’s a small group of reporters and photographers who have made it their career to jump from one war to another.

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

We're covering two issues on this edition of Global Journalist.

First, Jason McLure interviews Saw Yan Naing (@yannaingsaw), a journalist from Myanmar. He's in the United States as part of the Alfred Friendly Fellowship Program, which creates partnerships between American media outlets and journalists from around the world.

Fernando Llano / AP

Venezuela is a country that should, by all accounts, be doing quite well. It’s one of the top oil-producing countries in the world.

But the South American nation also has one of the highest murder rates in the world, a government whose officials are accused of selling drugs, and millions living below the poverty line. Not only that, the country's economy is crumbling, and the government is notorious for clamping down on journalists who challenge it on these issues.

Sayyid Azim / AP

You see the label on coffee, chocolate, t-shirts and even gold, “Fair Trade.” The extra dollars you pay for the products are meant to guarantee they’re produced ethically and sustainably. And that the farmers and workers who produced them are justly compensated. What began as a humble effort by a few churches and activists a half a century ago to help people in the developing world has grown into a multibillion dollar industry. But the movement has attracted critics, who say the label today is mostly marketing that benefits companies in Europe and the U.S.

Bikas Das / AP

Journalists and bloggers in Bangladesh are finding themselves increasingly under fire. Last year, a group that calls itself “Defenders of Islam” published a “hit list” of more than 80 writers.

Then in the first six months of 2015, three of those named were hacked to death in separate knife attacks. The latest was in May, when four masked men attacked blogger Ananta Bijoy Das with machetes while he was heading to work.

Matilde Campodonico / AP

This summer, the United States Supreme Court will make a decision on whether to legalize same-sex marriage. But some countries in Latin America have already done that, with Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay being three that have made gay marriage legal. In this edition of Global Journalist, we look at gay rights in the region, and how some countries are actually going backwards in terms of gay rights.

This week's guests:

Abir Sultan / EPA

In the wake of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu surprisingly wide election victory, Global Journalist examines whether Israel's politics have fundamentally shifted to the right on everything from security to the possibility of a Palestinian state.

Our guests this week:

A New Cuba?

May 7, 2015
Desmond Boylan / AP

After more than 50 years of hostility and frozen ties with the United States, Cuba is preparing to open up to the world. In this edition of Global Journalist, we look at what it’s like reporting in the Communist country, and what the restoration of diplomatic relations means for Cuba's economy and people.

This week's guests:

Covering Syria

Apr 23, 2015
Ibrahim Khader

  The four-year long civil war in Syria has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives and forced millions to flee. But coverage of the conflict has waned, as other news stories have taken center stage. Global Journalist looks at how journalists are covering the war, and how it's affecting people on the ground.

This week's guests:

Jerome Delay / AP

Ethiopia's parliamentary elections are set to be held May 24th, but there is little doubt the ruling party will win an overwhelming majority amidst a crackdown on independent media and political dissidents. This week on Global Journalist, we look at why and how the restrictions on the media in Africa's second-most populous country began, and speak with a journalist who spent more than a year in prison for reporting.

Jon Chol Jin / AP

North Korea has long been a forbidden land for journalists, human rights advocates, and pretty much anyone who publicly disagrees with the regime’s philosophies and practices. But there have been more and more cracks in the facade, and people are beginning to share their stories with the rest of the world.

Ciro Fusco / EPA

Two years after Pope Francis was selected to lead the Roman Catholic church, Global Journalist's Jason McLure sits down with three Catholic news agency journalists who to examine his popularity and how he interacts with the media.  

This week's guests:

Deported for a Tweet

Mar 27, 2015
AP/Today's Zaman

This week on Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg takes you around the world for a series of stories on the challenges of journalism in a rapidly changing world.

*Mahir Zeynalov, an Azerbaijani columnist for Turkey's Today's Zaman newspaper, speaks with Global Journalist's Jason McLure about being deported from Turkey for his Twitter use.

Yemen on the Brink

Mar 19, 2015
Hani Mohammed / Associated Press

The small Arabian peninsula nation of Yemen has gone through a lot of turmoil in the past decade. One president was ousted in 2012 during the Arab Spring, in January a second was overthrown by the Houthis, an Iranian-backed militia. Meanwhile al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, perhaps the terror group's most deadly affiliate, has seized the opportunity to expand its presence in Yemen.

What is the future of this country, and what does it mean for the West if it becomes an Iranian ally or descends into Somalia-style chaos?

European Pressphoto Agency

After the recent attacks in Copenhagen and France involving terrorists targeting Jewish people, Global Journalist looks at whether this is indicative of a broad rise in anti-Semitism in the region.

We examine recent incidents in France, the Netherlands and Denmark and discuss the threat from Islamic extremists and far-right and far-left political groups.

Dolores Ochoa / AP

Many people know Ecuador as the home of calm and picturesque sights, from the Galapagos Islands and lush Amazonian rain forest to soaring Andean peaks.

Courtesy NPR

We talk to Audie Cornish, recipient of a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal, about her work at NPR and the future of radio.

Kin Cheung / AP Photo

The Guardian is a well known and highly respected newspaper that received a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal for services to journalism. We interviewed James Ball, special projects editor at The Guardian, about his newspaper's work and mission. We also spoke to Ball about his connection to Julian Assange and Edward Snowden; he's worked for Wikileaks and with the Guardian team that published the groundbreaking stories about the National Security Agency's mass surveillance program based on leaked documents from Edward Snowden.

Honoring the Kyiv Post

Jan 8, 2015
Kyiv Post

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

We interviewed Brian Bonner and Katya Gorchinskaya of the Kyiv Post, which received a 2014 Missouri Honor Medal, about their careers and the future of journalism. The Kyiv Post is an English language, independent newspaper that became a prime source of information for the west when Russian actions in Ukraine escalated.

Global Journalist

  We speak to Byron "Barney" Calame, a recipient of the 2014 Missouri Honor Medal, about his career at The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Joining us is Paul Steiger, the founder of ProPublica, and the former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal.

The future of international journalism

Dec 25, 2014
Casey Morell

With news outlets cutting budgets and with more freelance opportunities arising, what does the media landscape look like for those who want to cover stories around the world? We talk to Stephen Davis, head of the journalism faculty at Sydney, Australia's Macleay College, about the future of international journalism. He's a veteran journalist who has worked in several countries, and has a unique perspective on what the media landscape will look like in the next few years.

Aziz Karimov / AP Photo

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

With the recent arrest of Azeri investigative reporter Khadija Ismayilova, we look at Azerbaijan's crackdowns on journalists, and whether there's hope for the future. Our guests:

What happened to #BringBackOurGirls?

Dec 11, 2014
Ben Curtis / AP Photo

This episode of Global Journalist is audio only.

Remember the social media campaign #BringBackOurGirls? It was meant to draw attention to the kidnapping of 276 Nigerian girls, who were taken from their school in April by Boko Haram, an Islamic militant group based in northern Nigeria. A few of the girls were either able to escape, or were released. But, the international attention once given to the story has largely dissipated, and 219 of the schoolgirls are still missing. This week on Global Journalist, we look at Boko Haram, the #BringBackOurGirls campaign, and what steps are being taken to combat Islamic extremism in Nigeria. 

After Iguala, what's next for Mexico?

Dec 4, 2014
Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo

Earlier this year, you may have heard of an incident in a small city in Mexico, where a group of 43 teaching students disappeared. The men who vanished in September were studying at a rural college called Ayotzinapa Normal School. On September 26, more than 100 students from the school had been protesting teacher hiring practices and funding for teachers’ colleges in the nearby city of Iguala. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the investigation, and what effect the disappearances have had in Mexico. Our guests:

Aaron Favila / AP Photo

We’re all familiar with border disputes on land … but what about those on the water? Maritime disputes in the Arctic and in the South China Sea are increasing, as countries vie for valuable natural resources beneath the ocean’s waves. Current international law sets strict guidelines on what economic rights countries have off their coasts. But, is the system in place the best one? Is the International Law of the Sea still sufficient today?

Indigenous land rights in Australia

Nov 20, 2014
Mark Baker / AP Photo

Throughout the world, indigenous people are fighting for the right to reclaim land they lost due to European territorial expansion, colonialism, or to other means. One place where this debate has been ongoing is Australia. There, Aboriginal peoples and other indigenous people have fought for years to advance their native land claims — with resistance from the government and mining and energy companies. This week on Global Journalist, we’ll talk about some other land disputes between Aboriginal peoples and Australia’s federal & provincial governments. Our guests:

Indonesia's new man in charge

Nov 13, 2014
Tatan Syuflana / AP Photo

On 20 October, Joko Widodo took office as Indonesia's new president. Jokowi, as he is popularly known, is the first Indonesian president without a military background or from an elite political family. What challenges does he face as president?

Our guests:

Ebola epidemic continues

Nov 6, 2014
Michael Duff / AP

Since our last program on Ebola, the death toll from the disease has more than doubled to 4,800. U.S. and Spanish aid workers sickened by Ebola also transmitted it to medical workers in the U.S. and in Spain - causing widespread media coverage - and leading people to talk of an epidemic of “Fear-Bola.” But there is good news. The West African nation of Liberia has been hardest hit by the disease, with an estimated 6,500 cases. But last week the country reported just 89 new probable cases.