Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

After nearly 50 years of military rule, the country officially known as Myanmar has slowly emerged from its near-lifetime of isolation and repression. Since 2011, the country has opened up to the international community and instituted a number of political reforms, including the release of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. In 2012 the government ended its policy of media censorship.

Eraldo Peres / Associated Press

November 15 is a big day for Brazil. It’s celebrated as the Proclamation of the Republic, when Brazilian army officers overthrew Emperor Dom Pedro and the monarchy came to an end. So it seems fitting that on Nov. 15 this year, on Brazil’s independence day, the country’s biggest corruption case came to an end.

Axel Heimken / Associated Press

For decades, investigative journalists have worked tirelessly to unearth stories on government wrongdoing, corporate malfeasance, and other issues that provide a better understanding of the world around us, and hopefully, spark change. 

Esteban Felix / Associated Press

China has dramatically increased its economic influence in Latin America. The United States is still the region’s largest investor, but China is now in second place and gaining a larger market share. In 2009, for example, China loaned a Brazilian oil company $10 billion and built a cellphone factory in Venezuela. The next year, China signed a $10 billion deal for the construction of railroads in Argentina. And in March, Ecuador agreed to auction off one-third of the country's Amazonian rainforest to Chinese oil companies.
Muzaffar Salman / Associated Press

This week, we'll revisit two of our favorite interviews from the past year.

Casey Morell / Global Journalist

The 9th of November is an important day in German history, for both highs and lows. It's the day the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, and it's the day the German states became a republic in 1918 before the end of World War I.

However, November 9 is also the anniversary of Kristallnacht –  the night of broken glass. On that night in 1938, the Nazis led riots through the cities of Germany. Jewish owned businesses were ransacked; their storefronts defaced with graffiti; their windows smashed. Nearly 30,000 Jews were arrested that night alone, and sent to concentration camps throughout the Reich. Historians widely consider Kristallnacht to be one of the first major events in the run-up to the Holocaust.

Joseph Schatz / Associated Press

Zambia is one of the world’s richest nations, as long as you measure wealth by natural resources. 
David Von Blohn / Associated Press

Chile’s presidential election takes place on Sunday. The two leading candidates are both daughters of generals who were once friends in the Chilean Air Force. But the similarities end there. 

Are protests in Sudan a prelude to an 'African Spring' uprising?

Nov 7, 2013
Khalil Hamra / Associated Press

On Sept. 23, thousands of Sudanese protesters took to the streets of the capital Khartoum. The country’s autocratic leaders lifted fuel subsidies to raise revenue, leaving outraged citizens to deal with sky rocketing fuel prices. In response to the violent riots, the government imposed a 24-hour Internet blackout to strip citizens of social media communication and block the media coverage.

Guardia Costiera / Associated Press

Hundreds of desperate refugees from North Africa drowned this month after their overcrowded boats sank in the Mediterranean. This past weekend there was another close call. More than 700 migrants traveling in five boats were rescued off the coast of Sicily by the Italian navy and coastguard. The European Union’s border agency says about 30,000 migrants have arrived in Italy from Africa during the first nine months of this year. That’s three times higher than the migration for all 12 months of 2012.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

Foreign countries were generally puzzled by the U.S. government’s partial shutdown and its flirtation with the debt ceiling. With the debt authorization deadline fast approaching, the newspaper Le Monde’s front-page story had this headline, referring to France’s favorite founding father: “Jefferson, wake up, they’ve gone crazy.” 

Ebrahim Seyyedi / Associated Press

This week, Iranian negotiators proposed a set of confidence-building measures aimed at ending the decade-long deadlock over the country’s nuclear program. The measures were revealed at a two-day meeting in Geneva with the five permanent Security Council members and Germany, a group known collectively as the P5+1.

Vadim Ghirda / Associated Press

A gold mining project in Romania has sparked the biggest street protests since the 1989 revolution.

A look at Bloomberg News

Oct 3, 2013
Mark Lennihan / Associated Press

While many news organizations are reducing their international operations, Bloomberg News is expanding. Bloomberg News now has nearly 200 news bureaus in 72 countries. 

Rafiq Maqbool / Associated Press

The sexual assault of a young woman on a New Delhi bus last December sparked widespread debate about the safety of women in India. The attack killed a 23-year-old aspiring physical therapist, and led to  nationwide protests.

Impunity prevails in Mexico's drug war

Sep 19, 2013
Associated Press

Covering crime and corruption in Mexico may be the most dangerous job in the world of journalism. On average, 10 journalists have been killed every year since 2006. And attacks on the media have increased since a new president took office nine months ago.

How conservatives won Australia's election

Sep 13, 2013
Rick Rycroft / AP Photo

The conservative party won national elections in Australia this week. The coalition led by Tony Abbott unseated the Labor party, which held power for 6 years.

Manu Brabo / Associated Press

Syria has been an extremely dangerous place for reporters and photographers to work. The regime of President Bashar al-Assad regime has banned foreign journalists. Now, they face dangers from all sides, including desperate rebels and hostile Islamist militants.
Hassan Ammar / AP Photo

Since the military takeover in Egypt last month, journalists have been attacked from all sides of the conflict. When security forces shot Tamer Abdel-Raouf at a military checkpoint a week ago, the Egyptian daily newspaper reporter became the fifth journalist to die on the job. On that same day, authorities raided a Turkish news agency and arrested its bureau chief.

Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

On Wednesday, former Army private Bradley Manning, now known as Chelsea Manning, was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. The sentence, which is the longest ever imposed in a leak case in the U.S., is amplifying the debate over the Obama administration’s prosecution of government employees who leak classified information to the public. 

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

After nearly 50 years of military rule, the country officially known as Myanmar has slowly emerged from its near-lifetime of isolation and repression. Since 2011, the country has opened up to the international community and instituted a number of political reforms, including the release of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. In 2012 the government ended its policy of media censorship.

Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi / Associated Press

On July 31, voters in Zimbabwe took part in the country’s presidential election. The contest pitted longtime President Robert Mugabe against his rival Morgan Tsvangirai. 

Every year the Alfred Friendly Foundation places international journalists in newsrooms across the U.S. The organization aims to impart American journalistic traditions and promote efforts worldwide to promote fair and accurate news. 

Associated Press

Next week in the southern Philippines, prosecutors will try to take another small step forward in the quest to put suspects in the Maguindanao Massacre on trial.

Nation Media Group flourishes in Kenya

Jul 18, 2013
Ben Curtis / Associated Press

Freedom of the press is rising steadily in Kenya. The constitution now specifically prohibits the state from interfering with the editorial independence of journalists and their media outlets, both state-owned and private.

Jun Yasukawa / Associated Press

There aren’t too many similarities between the mass street protests in Egypt and those in Brazil, aside from the fact that many large media outlets took sides in the disputes.

New media law angers journalists in Ecuador

Jun 27, 2013
Dolores Ochoa / Associated Press

Ecuador’s government made international news for two actions recently. The country's foreign minister met with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange at its London embassy. Assange took refuge in Ecuador’s embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faces questioning for alleged sexual assaults.

Associated Press

The outcome of Iran’s presidential election last Friday is generally regarded as a surprise.

Mohammad Hannon / Associated Press

In Jordan this week, dozens of journalists demonstrated near the royal palace in Amman. They were protesting against the government’s decision to block access to about 300 of the country’s 400 local news websites.

Associated Press

In Turkey, the daily clashes between demonstrators and police have grown into a protest movement. The uprising that defies comparison started modestly last week in the center of Istanbul. Environmentalists gathered in Taksim Square to protest against the government’s plan to pave over a small park.