Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

Impunity prevails in Mexico's drug war

Sep 19, 2013
Associated Press

Covering crime and corruption in Mexico may be the most dangerous job in the world of journalism. On average, 10 journalists have been killed every year since 2006. And attacks on the media have increased since a new president took office nine months ago.

How conservatives won Australia's election

Sep 13, 2013
Rick Rycroft / AP Photo

The conservative party won national elections in Australia this week. The coalition led by Tony Abbott unseated the Labor party, which held power for 6 years.

Manu Brabo / Associated Press

Syria has been an extremely dangerous place for reporters and photographers to work. The regime of President Bashar al-Assad regime has banned foreign journalists. Now, they face dangers from all sides, including desperate rebels and hostile Islamist militants.
Hassan Ammar / AP Photo

Since the military takeover in Egypt last month, journalists have been attacked from all sides of the conflict. When security forces shot Tamer Abdel-Raouf at a military checkpoint a week ago, the Egyptian daily newspaper reporter became the fifth journalist to die on the job. On that same day, authorities raided a Turkish news agency and arrested its bureau chief.

Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

On Wednesday, former Army private Bradley Manning, now known as Chelsea Manning, was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. The sentence, which is the longest ever imposed in a leak case in the U.S., is amplifying the debate over the Obama administration’s prosecution of government employees who leak classified information to the public. 

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

After nearly 50 years of military rule, the country officially known as Myanmar has slowly emerged from its near-lifetime of isolation and repression. Since 2011, the country has opened up to the international community and instituted a number of political reforms, including the release of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. In 2012 the government ended its policy of media censorship.

Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi / Associated Press

On July 31, voters in Zimbabwe took part in the country’s presidential election. The contest pitted longtime President Robert Mugabe against his rival Morgan Tsvangirai. 

Every year the Alfred Friendly Foundation places international journalists in newsrooms across the U.S. The organization aims to impart American journalistic traditions and promote efforts worldwide to promote fair and accurate news. 

Associated Press

Next week in the southern Philippines, prosecutors will try to take another small step forward in the quest to put suspects in the Maguindanao Massacre on trial.

Nation Media Group flourishes in Kenya

Jul 18, 2013
Ben Curtis / Associated Press

Freedom of the press is rising steadily in Kenya. The constitution now specifically prohibits the state from interfering with the editorial independence of journalists and their media outlets, both state-owned and private.

Jun Yasukawa / Associated Press

There aren’t too many similarities between the mass street protests in Egypt and those in Brazil, aside from the fact that many large media outlets took sides in the disputes.

New media law angers journalists in Ecuador

Jun 27, 2013
Dolores Ochoa / Associated Press

Ecuador’s government made international news for two actions recently. The country's foreign minister met with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange at its London embassy. Assange took refuge in Ecuador’s embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faces questioning for alleged sexual assaults.

Associated Press

The outcome of Iran’s presidential election last Friday is generally regarded as a surprise.

Mohammad Hannon / Associated Press

In Jordan this week, dozens of journalists demonstrated near the royal palace in Amman. They were protesting against the government’s decision to block access to about 300 of the country’s 400 local news websites.

Associated Press

In Turkey, the daily clashes between demonstrators and police have grown into a protest movement. The uprising that defies comparison started modestly last week in the center of Istanbul. Environmentalists gathered in Taksim Square to protest against the government’s plan to pave over a small park.

Wong Maye-E / Associated Press

The collapse of a factory in Bangladesh that killed more than a thousand workers caused a flurry of outrage and widespread calls for sweatshop reforms. But so did the fire four months earlier that killed more than a hundred workers at another Bangladesh garment factory.

Associated Press

The deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon and security concerns about the upcoming winter Olympics in Russia have a common link: the North Caucasus. This rugged region between the Caspian and Black Seas is beset by a violent Islamic insurgency.
Anjum Naveed / Associated Press

Pakistan has reached a milestone for democracy. For the first time, the country has transferred power from one democratically elected government to another. Voters on Saturday rejected the incumbent party and picked the party led by former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.

Muzaffar Salman / Associated Press

The editorial cartoon is a dependable measure of press freedom in a given country. As advocates point out, a cartoonist cannot work when there is no freedom of speech and opinion. Two cases illustrate the point.

In the early months of the Syrian revolution, editorial cartoonist Ali Ferzat was threatened and eventually attacked for drawing cartoons making fun of President Bashar Al-Assad. The thugs broke both of his hands. But crackdowns on the free expression of editorial cartoonists don’t just happen in dictatorships.

Associated Press

Western Sahara is nearly as big as its northern neighbor, Morocco, but in truth, this stretch of desert along the Atlantic Ocean may be Africa’s most overlooked territorial dispute.

Journalists on the front lines in Honduras

Apr 26, 2013
Fernando Antonio / AP Photo

Honduras has become akin to a war zone, since the 2009 coup that deposed the former president, Manuel Zelaya. The country of around 8 million people, bordered by Guatemala, Nicaragua, the Pacific Ocean, and Caribbean Sea, is among the most dangerous places on earth. 

Photo courtesy of Dirty Wars

In the past few months, a trio of documentary films and the feature film Zero Dark Thirty have given viewers an inside look at counterterrorism and covert warfare. The films coincide with a growing international scrutiny of drone strikes — a new type of targeted killing that’s been the centerpiece of U.S. counterintelligence strategy since Barack Obama became president.  

Hadi Mizban / AP Images

Ten years ago this week, U.S. and British troops took control of Baghdad. A tank crew helped Iraqis pull down an enormous bronze statue of Saddam Hussein in the center of the capital. The toppling became a symbol of victory over the dictator’s regime.

Julio Cortez / AP Images

In a New Jersey park, there is a stone and bronze memorial dedicated to the 200,000 or so women from South Korea, China and the Philippines who were sexually enslaved by Japanese soldiers during World War II.

Courtesy of Pussy Riot - A Punk Prayer

During the True/False Documentary Film Festival in Columbia, directors from around the world gather to screen their films and talk about their craft.

Pervez Masih / AP Images

In the past decade, Pakistan’s media has become larger, more powerful and more independent. The number of private television channels has grown from just three state-run channels in 2000 to 89 in 2012. But the challenges to practicing journalism are also growing.

Amine Landoulsi / AP Images

Social media pioneer Andy Carvin drew high praise from fellow journalists for his coverage of the revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Syria.  The NPR reporter and strategist tracked the Arab Spring events in real time, from thousands of miles away in Washington.

Benedicte Desrus / AP Images

Five years ago, disputes over election results in Kenya sparked weeks of ethnic violence in the relatively well-developed African country. More than one thousand people were killed, as supporters of rival candidates clashed.

Franklin Reyes / AP Images

World leaders from five continents gathered in Caracas on Friday to pay their last respects for Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. The Venezuelan leader held the country's presidency from 1999 until his death earlier this week.

Courtesy of 'Dirty Wars'

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.