Here and Now on KBIA 2

Weekdays Noon to 2pm

Here! Now! Imperative: not to be avoided: necessary. In a typical week, the show will cover not only all the big news stories, but also the stories behind the stories, or some of the less crucial but equally intriguing things happening in the world.

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A ruling yesterday from the National Labor Relations Board gave contract workers and employees of franchises a lot more leverage to unionize.

The NLRB’s decision gives those employees the right to negotiate a union contract not only with a franchise owner, but also with the larger parent company. It has implications in the fast food industry, which is locked in a national debate about worker pay and benefits.

Michael Regan of Bloomberg News discusses this with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

Gyms and personal trainers across the country are watching new regulations coming from the Board of Physical Therapy in Washington, D.C. The board is preparing new guidelines that would make a registry of personal trainers and place further requirements on the industry.

Gyms fear Washington will be a testing ground for other states. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Phillip Godfrey, a medical exercise specialist in Washington, D.C. who opposes the regulations.

As the nation marks 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, Here & Now has a special New Orleans edition of the DJ Sessions. Host Jeremy Hobson sits down with Nick Spitzer, a New Orleans resident and host of “American Routes,” from Tulane University and WWNO in New Orleans, distributed by PRX. He talks about the music that has resonated in the city since the storm, and how the music scene has changed.

Chinese Action Musical Comes To Denver

Aug 27, 2015

A new Chinese action musical is holding its U.S. premiere on a stage in Denver. “Terracotta Warriors 3D” is a live performance piece centered around the story of China’s first emperor, who was buried with an army of clay soldiers. It’s part of an effort to spread Chinese culture around the world. Corey Jones from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio reports.

This week, students arriving at Old Dominion University could see banners hanging from a Sigma Nu fraternity house. “Rowdy and fun, hope your baby girl is ready for a good time,” and “freshman daughter drop off.” The signs were criticized for mocking sexual violence against women, and sparked national outrage.

A former student at St. Paul’s School, an elite New Hampshire prep school, is on trial for allegedly raping a freshman girl two days before graduation in 2014. The alleged assault is suspected to be part of a longstanding hook-up tradition at the Concord, New Hampshire, boarding school. Paige Sutherland from Here & Now contributor New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

On TV, Katrina Has Gone Mostly Unseen

Aug 26, 2015

TV journalism was crucial to the country seeing what was and wasn’t being done to help the survivors of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Since then, however, there has not been a focus – in either fictionalized television or in journalism – on the underlying issues that were uncovered.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss why issues like poverty and class are generally unattractive to many TV audiences.

Update 2:23 p.m.: Franklin County Sheriff Bill Overton says the suspect in the shooting has died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Virginia State Police say that as they were pursuing the suspect in an on-air fatal shooting, he ran off the road and crashed, and was found suffering from a gunshot wound.

Virginia State Police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said Wednesday that the suspect is being treated for life-threatening injuries.

Mount Everest Reopened To Climbers

Aug 26, 2015

Japanese mountaineer Nobukazu Kuriki is heading up Everest. This week he became the first person granted a permit to climb the mountain since a 7.8 magnitude earthquake devastated much of Nepal in April.

After four attempts, Kuriki hopes to reach the top. He also says he hopes to send a message that the mountain is safe for climbers.

Seven-time summiter Peter Athans says Nepal needs tourists now more than ever. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

For decades, sandwiches have been the go-to food for picnics and school lunches. In the 1950’s, various trade organizations declared August to be National Sandwich Month. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares a few of her favorites with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

As we mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast and killed more than 1,800 people in August of 2005, Here & Now listens back to some of the memorable moments from the storm and the news coverage.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Napa Valley Wine Train is facing backlash, after members of women’s book club said they were kicked off the train over the weekend because of their race. All but one of the 11 book club members kicked off the train was African-American. The train company says the group was being too noisy. Danielle Belton of The Root discusses the story with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that most U.S. middle and high schools start the school day too early, before 8:30 a.m.

Lead author Dr. Anne Wheaton says if teens don’t get enough sleep, they are more prone to not getting enough exercise and engaging in risky behavior like drinking alcohol. She cites a recommendation from the National Sleep Foundation that 14 to 17-year-olds need eight to 10 hours of sleep a night.

What makes American music “American”? The answer depends on who you ask.

Guitarist Albert Hammond, Jr. was born in Los Angeles to two immigrants, the British-Gibraltarian musician Albert Hammond and Argentine model Claudia Fernández. When he was 18, he moved to New York City to form what would become the hugely successful band The Strokes.

A pioneering mushroom scientist and a bee expert have teamed up to help fight against a disease-carrying killer of the honeybee called the varroa mite. The scientists’ weapon of choice: mushrooms. They believe a special fungus mixture they’re working on may be able to kill parasites without harming bees. Ken Christensen of Here & Now contributor EarthFix went into the field with the scientists and reports.

As the nation approaches the 10-year anniversary of the destruction from Hurricane Katrina, it’s worth remembering that while New Orleans felt the eye of the storm, Katrina also left 238 people dead in Mississippi, and destroyed 230,000 homes in that state.

How did the Mississippi Gulf Coast recover after such devastation, and what lingering issues still remain? Evelina Burnett of Mississippi Public Broadcasting discusses this with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd.

Faced with a shortage of primary care doctors, more and more clinics are relying on nurse practitioners to fill the gap. But that creates another gap, in the level of training providers bring to the job.

As Rowan Moore Gerety of Northwest Public Radio reports, residency programs, once reserved for physicians, are popping up for nurse practitioners as well.

Akron Loves Devo

Aug 21, 2015

A life-sized photo of the new wave band Devo was mounted over an abandoned storefront in downtown Akron, Ohio, this past week. The picture was taken in 1978, and features the band dressed in yellow hazmat suits.

This piece of public art is designed to capture the moment the band made the leap from hometown heroes to worldwide fame. From the Here & Now contributors network, David C. Barnett of WCPN brings us the story of Devo’s Rust Belt roots.

Gawker, Salon, and Vice have all decided to unionize their editorial staffs this summer. Buzzfeed’s owner, however, says collective bargaining wouldn’t be right for his company.

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about why unions are making their way into new media, and whether Jonah Peretti is right to say unions wouldn’t be good for his employees.

Des Moines Makes The List

Aug 20, 2015

It seems like every time you log onto Facebook someone has shared a link to one of those lists that rank cities in categories. “The 10 Happiest Cities for Young Professionals” or “America’s Best Cities for Barbecue.” Why are these lists so popular? And more importantly, what’s their impact? Iowa Public Radio’s Sarah Boden went in search of answers.

Is Breakfast Really So Important?

Aug 20, 2015

The debate rages on: Is breakfast the most important meal of your day, or can you skip it without dire consequences? NPR food and nutrition correspondent Allison Aubrey explains that the answer isn’t simple. Although most people do report eating breakfast, the health benefits depend on what you eat and who you are. She discusses the research with Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins.

Guest

The recent New York Times article on the work environment at Amazon has put a spotlight on the culture of the competitive workplace and the increasing difficulty of attaining a satisfying work-life balance.

Amazon culls its workforce annually, based in part on performance reviews from coworkers. It’s a data-driven system that could be coming to more companies soon.

KCRW DJ Chris Douridas joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to share some new summer music. There’s a bit of country and bluegrass with Pokey LaFarge and the Kiwi singer Marlon Williams. There are also some deep electro tracks with Maximum Balloon and the Flemish group Waar is Ken?

Security experts are telling multiple news outlets today that the leaked names of Ashley Madison customers appear to be real. Ashley Madison markets itself with the tagline, "Life is short. Have an affair." About one month ago it was reported that the site had been hacked and the names and credit card numbers of 37 million customers could be posted online.

You might wonder how cardboard boxes, duct tape and a swimming pool can solve a problem that has stumped researchers for years. That problem is how to get more women working in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM for short.

Some think the answer lies in giving girls hands-on projects that spark their curiosity and prepare them for not only advanced science courses in school, but also a STEM career. That's where the tape, cardboard and pool come in.

Canadian Election Campaign Is In Full Swing

Aug 18, 2015

The candidates in this fall’s election in Canada are running hard as the vote approaches in October. Prime Minister Stephen Harper leads the Conservative Party, but he has been hurt by a Canadian economy suffering from low global commodity prices.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with David Common, network host for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, about the campaigning in Canada and the upcoming vote.

[Youtube]

Remember the “death panels”? That’s what Sarah Palin called them when the Affordable Care Act first proposed paying doctors for end-of-life counseling with patients. The uproar killed that plan, but recently Medicare announced that beginning next year, it will pay doctors to have these discussions. Ruby de Luna from Here & Now contributor KUOW reports.

The Obama administration today directed $13.4 million to regional drug control agencies known as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA), including $2.5 million for what the White House is calling “an unprecedented partnership” between five regional HIDTA programs in the Northeast.

That smaller pot of money would be used to hire new police officers, as well as public health officials who would work together across state lines to identify targets and see where heroin is coming from.

Correction: The audio above inaccurately describes the accusations against Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood’s critics say the video shows staff discussing the sale of fetal tissue, but Planned Parenthood says the tissue has been donated, not sold, and that only the organization’s costs have been covered. We regret the error.

An explosion today at a popular shrine in central Bangkok has reportedly killed more than a dozen people. The blast was detonated at a busy downtown intersection where political demonstrations have taken place in recent years. The Erawan Shrine, a tourist landmark that is also popular with Bangkok’s residents, sits at that intersection, as does a five-star hotel.

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