Here and Now on KBIA 2

Weekdays Noon to 2pm

Here! Now! Imperative: not to be avoided: necessary. In a typical week, the show will cover not only all the big news stories, but also the stories behind the stories, or some of the less crucial but equally intriguing things happening in the world.

Click here to enter the Here and Now website.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51828883e1c89b958ccf153b|5182884be1c8c2efcdc168de

Pages

NPR Story
12:31 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Should We Get Paid For Our Online Data?

(Kevin McShane/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 4:10 pm

In the digital economy, data is the most valuable form of currency.

Companies mine it to learn about consumers and sell their products more effectively.

But what about the tension between ownership and the ubiquity of data?

Computer scientist and author Jaron Lanier says fortunes are made from the data that companies access about us.

His proposal to fix the digital economy: we should all own our own data, and companies — whether it’s Google or Citibank — should pay us every time any bit of our data is used.

Read more
NPR Story
4:03 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

An Adult Spin On A Childhood Favorite: The Tree House

A company in Ohio, Mohican Cabins, lets visitors live in luxury treehouses. (Mohican Cabins)

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 4:36 pm

When you hear “tree house,” you may picture kids perched in a tall oak, inside a patchwork fort of crudely nailed together construction scraps — maybe a rope ladder dangling from the trap door.

Well, a new cottage industry has emerged, putting a grown-up spin on this childhood refuge.

From Here & Now Contributors Network, Brian Bull of WCPN has the story.

Read more
NPR Story
4:03 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Is It Time To End The 'Diet Debates'?

Shoppers peruse the produce section at The Fresh Grocer supermarket in West Philadelphia. (Coke Whitworth/AP)

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 4:36 pm

Comparing diets is something of a national pastime in America: pitting the Atkins Diet against the Paleo Diet against the South Beach Diet. It also extends into medical research.

But a provocative new paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association says researchers should stop comparing diets altogether.

Instead, it suggests researchers shift their focus to how to change behavior — forever.

Read more
NPR Story
4:01 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

UN Investigating Alleged Chemical Attacks In Syria

This citizen journalism image, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows Syrian citizens mourning over the dead bodies of Syrian men after an alleged poisonous gas attack fired by regime forces, according to activists in Arbeen town, Damascus, Syria, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. (Local Committee of Arbeen via AP)

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 11:05 am

Syrian activists allege that Syrian President Bashar al Assad’s regime used chemical weapons against rebels today, killing hundreds of civilians.

The allegations come just after United Nations chemical weapons experts arrived in the country to investigate earlier alleged uses of these weapons.

Amy Smithson of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, explains what the UN team will be looking for and the challenges they face in determining chemical weapons use.

Read more
NPR Story
2:32 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Renee Graham On The New, Blue-Eyed R&B

Allen Stone is one of Here & Now pop culture critic Renee Graham's favorite R&B singers. (Lonnie Webb)

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:13 pm

Here & Now pop culture critic Renee Graham has noted a trend recently: for the most part, the biggest acts in mainstream R&B music are white men.

Read more
NPR Story
2:32 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

National Helium Reserve Faces Shutdown

(Bureau of Land Management)

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:13 pm

The National Helium Reserve is facing shutdown. The giant well of crude helium provides more than one-third of the world’s crude helium.

“It’s not a cave, it’s layers of rock, and the helium is stored in one layer of the rock,” Sam Burton, assistant field manager of helium operations at the Bureau of Land Management, told Here & Now.

The reserve isn’t just for nationally important party balloons. Helium is used in MRIs, computer chips and fiber-optic cable.

Read more
NPR Story
2:32 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Obama Presses Regulators To Move Quickly On Dodd-Frank

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:13 pm

On his first day back from vacation, President Barack Obama met with federal regulators at the White House.

The topic? The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act — most of which hasn’t even been written yet.

John Zumbrun of Bloomberg News joins Here & Now to explain.

Read more
NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Olympian Edwin Moses Helps Kids Clear Their Own Hurdles

Edwin Moses jumps a hurdle on his way to winning the gold medal in the 400-meter hurdles in Los Angeles, August 5, 1984. (AP)

Originally published on Sat August 24, 2013 12:22 pm

Edwin Moses was one of the best ever at clearing hurdles on the track.

Now, the two-time Olympic gold medal winner is helping kids in underserved neighborhoods clear their own hurdles.

Moses is chairman of the Laureus Sport For Good Foundation, which supports the training and placement of coaches in sports-based youth development programs in U.S. cities.

Read more
NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Leaked UN Report Increases Certainty On Climate Change

An iceberg in Greenland is pictured in May 2012. (Ian Joughin)

In a leaked climate report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) — a United Nations scientific body that makes definitive assessments on climate change — has determined with 95 percent certainty that humans are responsible for global warming.

The report also increased its estimate for sea level rise, as a result of the warming planet.

The final report is due to come out in September. A draft was leaked over the weekend.

Read more
NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Chicago Rocked By Spate Of Shootings

(voteprime/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:13 pm

Five people were shot last night in an uptown Chicago neighborhood

The shootings took place in broad daylight outside a church during prayer service, ironically along a so-called safe passage route.

One victim, shot in the head, remains in critical condition. The others are all stable.

The shootings come on the heels of a weekend shooting spree that killed one and left another eight injured, including a seven-year-old, in the city’s south, west and southwest.

Read more
NPR Story
3:47 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Convicted Art Forger Explains How It's Done

John Myatt is an artist and a convicted forger. (Castle Galleries)

In New York City, federal prosecutors have charged an art dealer named Glafira Rosales in connection with $80 million worth of forged art.

These are not copies — they’re paintings that look like they’re in the style of famous artists. The painter has not been charged in the case.

But John Myatt, an artist who also made forgeries of the great masters, was caught and charged. He has been described by Scotland Yard as one of the 20th century’s biggest art frauds.

Read more
NPR Story
3:47 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

UK Gets Century-Old Revenge At Golf Tournament

With his younger brother on the bag, Matthew Fitzpatrick (right) posted a 4-and-3 victory over Oliver Goss on Sunday to win the 2013 U.S. Amateur Championship. (John Mummert/USGA)

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:36 pm

A British teenager won the men’s U.S. Amateur Golf Championship at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. on Sunday.

In a way, the victory by 18-year-old Matt Fitzpatrick makes up for what happened on the very same golf course in 1913, when a young American named Francis Quiment defeated the two top British professionals of the day, Ted Ray and Harry Vardon, to win the U.S. Open.

Read more
NPR Story
3:47 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

U.S. General Court-Martialed Over Sexual Assault Charges

Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair. (U.S. Army)

As the military tries to stem the tide of sexual assault in the ranks, an Army general is on trial for sexual assault charges at Fort Bragg in North Carolina.

The charges follow Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair’s affair with a captain on his staff.

Sinclair has pleaded not guilty to all the charges, but the court martial so far has revealed sordid details about Sinclair’s relationship with his subordinate.

Read more
NPR Story
2:08 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Egypt's Former Dictator May Be Released

In this April 13, 2013, photo, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak waves to his supporters from behind bars as he attends a hearing in his retrial on appeal in Cairo, Egypt. (AP)

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:47 pm

Officials in Egypt say they have no grounds to hold former President Hosni Mubarak in custody, and he could be released this week.

That notice came with news that Islamic militants killed 25 policemen in the Sinai peninsula this morning, after ambushing their mini-buses.

An Egyptian court has ruled that the government must release the country’s former ruler, Hosni Mubarak, because it had reached the two year limit for holding someone in custody pending a verdict.

Read more
NPR Story
2:08 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Typhoon Brings A Wave Of Sound With 'Young Fathers'

Members of the Oregon band "Typhoon." (Typhoon)

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:47 pm

Each week, NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson brings Here & Now a new song to liven up our playlists.

This week he introduces us to the Portland, Oregon, band Typhoon through the song, “Young Fathers.”

The song is jumps from whispered parts to sections where lyrics are shouted over horn sections.

Kyle Morton, who leads the band, had a hard childhood — and that comes through in his music, Thompson says.

Read more
NPR Story
2:08 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Western Kansas Farmers Face Dwindling Water Supply

Anthony Stevenson has switched many of his acres to non-irrigated farming with water becoming more scarce, but that has meant taking a financial hit. (Frank Morris/Harvest Public Media)

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:47 pm

A drought now in its third year in parts of western Kansas is taxing a resource that has been under pressure for decades: the High Plains Aquifer.

The aquifer is enormous, but it’s running low in places, forcing a move to dryland farming — that is, farming without the aid of irrigation.

And farmers aren’t the only ones affected.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Frank Morris of Harvest Public Media reports.

Read more
NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Swimming Into History

Gertrude Ederle became the first woman to swim across the English Channel on August 16, 1926. (commons.wikipedia.com)

On this day in 1926, Gertrude Ederle spent 14 hours and 31 minutes making history.

The 20-year-old from New York, who had won a gold and two bronze medals for the United States at the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, became the first woman to swim across the English Channel.

Not only that, she beat the times of the five men who had accomplished the feat before her by nearly two hours despite straying off-course in the rough water and turning the 21-mile swim into a 35-mile adventure.

Read more
NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

'White Devil' Unlikely Chinatown Gang Leader

Boston gang member John Willis, who also goes by “white devil” in Cantonese, will be sentenced for federal drug and money laundering charges on Aug. 15.

Willis emerged as an unlikely white member of one of Boston’s Chinatown Asian gangs after joining a Chinese family and learning to speak Cantonese as a child.

Read more
NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Researcher: Kids' Courting Behavior Increasingly Explicit, Unhealthy

A girl texts on a bench. (James Offer/Flickr)

New research shows that boys are increasingly using sexually explicit social media messages to flirt, and it may be hurting them, as much as the girls who receive it.

We’ve long known about sexting: when kids use sexually provocative language and pictures.

But after four years of collecting interviews from students ages 4 to 18, their parents and their teachers, clinical psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair, a Harvard instructor, has concluded that the courting behavior children now use is much more aggressive and sexual than it used to be.

Read more
NPR Story
1:48 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Teen Romance Flicks Through The Ages

A scene from the romance film, The Spectacular Now (specatularnowmovie.com)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

The new film “The Spectacular Now” has gotten Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr thinking about teen romance films through the years.

He shares some of his favorites with us, including “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” “Say Anything…,” “Pretty in Pink” and “West Side Story.”

Read more
NPR Story
1:47 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Al-Qaida Surges Into Syria

This Jan. 11, 2013 citizen journalism image shows rebels from al-Qaida affiliated Jabhat al-Nusra waving their brigade flag as they stand on a Syrian air force helicopter, at Taftanaz air base that was captured by the rebels, in Idlib province, northern Syria. (Edlib News Network ENN via AP)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has always blamed the conflict in Syria on terrorists, even when it started as a popular uprising.

Now, he might finally be right. An affiliate of al-Qaida in Iraq is surging into Syria. It’s called the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

This new group is in competition with the original Syrian al-Qaida affiliate, Jabhat al-Nusra, but they are seemingly aligned — along with rebel groups — in the effort to oust Assad.

Read more
NPR Story
1:47 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Why ESPN Reigns Supreme In Covering Sports

Ryan Phelan rehearses on the set of ESPN's SportsCenter at ESPN's headquarters in Bristol, Conn., Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. (Bob Child/AP)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

ESPN is the champion of sports media. If you look at the numbers, the 34-year-old network does reign supreme when it comes to covering sports.

The network’s value is estimated between $40 billion and $60 billion — that’s at least 20 times bigger than the New York Times Company.

Just this month, more than four million people watched ESPN’s “NASCAR Spring Cup,” making it the top cable sporting event of the week.

So how does ESPN live up to its tagline of “The Worldwide Leader in Sports”?

Read more
NPR Story
3:11 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

To Get Kids Into The Kitchen, Teach Them To Cook

Kids make "Little Lasagnas" from the cookbook "Chop Chop: The Kids Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family." (Carl Tremblay/Simon & Schuster)

Sally Sampson founded ChopChop magazine to get kids to eat healthier by getting them interested in cooking.

The magazine won a James Beard award earlier this year and this week, Sampson published the book “Chop Chop: The Kids Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family.”

Read more
NPR Story
3:10 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Economic Independence Is Transforming India's Marriage Culture

(Meghdut Gorai/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:20 pm

A rapidly changing world is altering the lives of millions of women.

In India, the rising economic wherewithal of a new generation of women is transforming an institution as old as the country itself: marriage.

NPR’s Julie McCarthy has this report on Indian match-making with a modern twist.

Read more
NPR Story
3:10 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

European Union Emerges From Recession

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:20 pm

After a record 18-month slump, the European Union is coming out of a recession.

Numbers released today show three-tenths of a percent growth for the second quarter of the year.

While that may not sound like a lot, it is a signal that a much-needed recovery to pull the eurozone out of its three-and-a-half-year debt crisis may be here.

Read more
NPR Story
2:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Legendary Steinway Piano Company Set To Change Hands

(Wexner Center/Flicker)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:20 pm

The 160-year-old piano maker, Steinway, is set to change hands. Last month, a private equity firm emerged as the likely buyer.

That was until today, when hedge fund manager John Paulson made an offer of $500 million. The billionaire now looks set to take control of one of the oldest manufacturers in the country.

But, Steinway’s workers don’t think a change of ownership will mean much of a change for them.

Read more
NPR Story
2:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Do Leaked Albums And Songs Hurt Or Help Artists?

An image from the cover of Lady Gaga's latest album, "Artpop." (Lady Gaga)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:20 pm

Katy Perry‘s new single “Roar” from her upcoming album “Prism” and Lady Gaga’s latest track “Applause” from her new album “ARTPOP,” both were leaked over the weekend. The artists and their labels have very different initial reactions.

Lady Gaga called upon fans to report leaks for removal, while Katy Perry simply tweeted “Looks like there’s a tiger on the loose!!!”

Ultimately, both songs were released early.

Read more
NPR Story
2:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

When It's Not Alzheimer’s: Little-Known Illness Mimics Dementia

Jim Lampert, right, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, but his wife Terrie, left, found a specialist who diagnosed him with normal pressure hydrocephalus. (Screenshot from Boston Globe video)

The last thing most patients do when they receive an Alzheimer’s diagnosis is seek another diagnosis.

But research shows that up to 5 percent of dementia cases are misdiagnosed cases of a treatable but largely unknown condition called “normal pressure hydrocephalus.”

It is theorized that NPH arises from excess fluid building up in the brain. The cure is to drain the fluid with shunts.

Read more
NPR Story
3:15 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Danny Strong: From 'Buffy' Extra To 'Butler' Screenwriter

Danny Strong at The Los Angeles Premiere of 'The Butler', on Monday, August 12, 2013 in Los Angeles. (Alexandra Wyman/Invision via AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:40 pm

Danny Strong went from being in the background in the cult favorite “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” to having an episode written for him and becoming one of the series’ villains.

Though he still acts, he’s become more well known as a screenwriter, winning two Emmys for his work on HBO’s “Game Change.”

Read more
NPR Story
3:15 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Bulger's Lawyers Will Appeal Murder Verdicts

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:40 pm

James “Whitey” Bulger is facing life in prison after yesterday’s dramatic verdicts in his case in federal court in Boston.

The jury convicted him on 31 of 32 counts in a murder and racketeering trial that lasted nearly two months.

His sentencing hearing is scheduled for November 13, but his lawyers plan to appeal.

The verdict was overwhelming, but as WBUR’s David Boeri reports, nothing in the Bulger case is ever as straightforward as it might appear.

Read more

Pages