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Here! Now! Imperative: not to be avoided: necessary. In a typical week, the show will cover not only all the big news stories, but also the stories behind the stories, or some of the less crucial but equally intriguing things happening in the world.

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NPR Story
11:45 am
Fri July 12, 2013

New Evidence May Give 'Boston Strangler' A Name

Albert DeSalvo, 35, is surrounded by police after his capture in Lynn on Feb. 25, 1967. DeSalvo was nabbed in a store a day after he escaped from Bridgewater State Hospital for the criminally insane. (AP)

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 2:45 pm

After almost 50 years, law enforcement officials say they have new evidence proving who killed the last victim in the infamous Boston Strangler case, a string of murders in the 1960s.

But questions are being asked about the new evidence and the way it was obtained.

WBUR’s Bruce Gellerman reports on the latest developments in this cold case.

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NPR Story
12:50 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Beyond AC/DC -- New Music Out Of Australia

Travis Holcombe is a DJ at KCRW. (KCRW)

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 9:30 am

KCRW, the public radio station in Santa Monica, California, is well known for setting tastes in music and discovering unknown talent.

Travis Holcombe, who DJs there, has been hearing a lot of interesting music out of Australia — from the group Jagwar Ma to Tame Impala.

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NPR Story
12:40 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

New Jersey Takes Up Same-Sex Marriage Fight

Advocates for gay marriage in New Jersey gather outside the Statehouse in Trenton, N.J., June 27, 2013. (Mel Evans/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:44 pm

New Jersey is the center of the next battle for gay marriage. The state is one of seven that offers same-sex couples civil unions or domestic partnerships.

Buoyed by the U.S. Supreme Court ruling striking down key provisions of the Defense of Marriage act, advocates will argue that the current law denies couples equal protection under the law.

Meanwhile, Democrats in the Garden State legislature are pushing for an override of Governor Christie’s veto of gay marriage legislation last year.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Happy 85th Birthday, Sliced Bread

(SliceOfChic/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:44 pm

Sliced bread turns 85 years old this month. The Chillicothe Baking Company sold the first wrapped package of sliced bread in history on July 7, 1928.

So what can sliced bread teach us about business?

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NPR Story
11:50 am
Thu July 11, 2013

John Singer Sargent And The Painting That Made His Reputation

"The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit" by John Singer Sargent, American, 1882. (Museum of Fine Arts Boston)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:44 pm

John Singer Sargent painted “The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit” more than 130 years ago, but his depiction of four little girls in white pinafores is still a favorite attraction at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

Erica Hirshler, senior curator at the MFA says the youngest daughter holds a particular pull.

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NPR Story
11:45 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Rookie Player Stirs Uproar In MLB All-Star Voting

Los Angeles Dodgers' Yasiel Puig during warmups to play against the Philadelphia Phillies in a baseball game Thursday, June 27, 2013, in Los Angeles. (Alex Gallardo/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:44 pm

Yasiel Puig, a rookie baseball player for the Los Angeles Dodgers, has generated buzz and controversy as fans vote for the last players to be named to the MLB All-Star teams. The game is next Tuesday.

Puig, 22-year-old Cuban defector, has only played in the major leagues for a little over a month and has impressed people with his stats and athleticism.

However, some people think his short tenure with the Dodgers makes him undeserving of being an All-Star. The only way he can make the All-Star team is if baseball fans vote him in, and voting ends today at 4 p.m.

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NPR Story
11:40 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Tampa Courts Cuba For Future Business

A street in Trinidad, Cuba. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:44 pm

Miami may be closer to Cuba and home to more people of Cuban ancestry, but Tampa is ready to capitalize on economic and diplomatic ties to to the island nation once the longstanding trade embargo is lifted.

Tampa business owners are talking about how to expand into Cuba, and politicians are making trips there.

“In Tampa, they supported the revolution that freed Cuba from Spain. They supported the Castro revolution. They consider themselves a lifeline to Cuba,” Eric Barton of the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting told Here & Now.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Australian Rocker Mia Dyson Builds U.S. Fanbase

Mia Dyson's latest album is "The Moment." (miadyson.com)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:50 am

Australian rocker Mia Dyson got the break of her career when she was taken on by former Eurythmics star Dave Stewart’s production company.

But after he started to market her as a bi-gender musician named “Boy,” she rebelled and went out on her own.

Mia Dyson has now released a new album “The Moment.” Here & Now producer Emiko Tamagawa caught up with Mia on tour.

“This record is the result of that three year period of moving here, struggling, then going with Dave Stewart, then it all falling apart,” Dyson said.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Competing For The Most Creative Beer Names

Brian O'Connell of Denver's Renegade Brewing shows off the new design for his renamed beer, Redacted. (Megan Verlee/Colorado Public Radio)

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 2:32 pm

There are more than 2,300 breweries operating in the United States, according to The Brewers Association. That’s the highest number since the 1880s.

You probably know these small brewers by the interesting names they have for their suds: Smooth Hoperator, Polygamy Porter and Donkey Punch come to mind.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

The Brain Science Of Drinking Diet Soda

(kenudigit/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 1:54 pm

More and more Americans are consuming artificial sweeteners as an alternative to sugar, but whether this translates into better health has been heavily debated.

NPR’s Allison Aubrey explains a new study in the journal “Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism” that looks at the brain science behind drinking diet soda.

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NPR Story
12:50 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Displacement Can Last A Lifetime For Many Refugees

A Syrian refugee boy, right, sits outside his tent next to his family at a temporary refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Marj near the border with Syria, Lebanon, Monday, May 20, 2013. (Hussein Malla/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 9:05 am

According to a recent report by the United Nations, more than 45 million people worldwide were forced to flee their homes in 2012 — the highest number of refugees in nearly two decades.

People leave their homes for many reasons, including war and violence, environmental disaster and persecution. More than half of the refugees worldwide came from five countries, according to the UN: Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, Sudan and Syria.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

A Jedi Knight In Queen Elizabeth's Court

Cover art from "William Shakespeare's Star Wars." (Quirk Books)

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 11:50 am

What if William Shakespeare had written Star Wars? Well now we know!

Ian Doescher, author of “William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope” pulls back curtain on the eternal question: what does a wookie sound like in Elizabethan English?

Book Excerpt: ‘William Shakespeare’s Star Wars’

By: Ian Doescher

BIGGS: Make haste, O Luke. Methinks they do approach

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Spain's Population Declines Amid Economic Crisis

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:50 am

The economic crisis in Spain, where the unemployment rate is a record 27 percent, is forcing people to leave the country to look for work.

The BBC’s Tom Burridge reports the birthrate in Spain is also falling, because couples believe they can’t afford to have children under the economic circumstances.

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The Salt
11:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Do Diet Drinks Mess Up Metabolisms?

Some researchers think that artificial sweeteners, most frequently consumed in diet drinks, may confuse the body.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:10 pm

It may seem counterintuitive, but there's a body of evidence to suggest that the millions of Americans with a diet soda habit may not be doing their waistlines — or their blood sugar — any favors.

As the consumption of diet drinks made with artificial sweeteners continues to rise, researchers are beginning to make some uncomfortable associations with weight gain and other diseases.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Advice Columnist Margo Howard Retires

Margo Howard is retiring from the advice business, and now working on a book about her life.

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:17 am

Margo Howard is the only child of the beloved advice columnist Ann Landers. Her mother’s twin sister, Pauline Phillips, was Dear Abby.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

The Tricky Business Of Farming — CSA Style

Michael Baute farms three acres in Fort Collins, Colo. One-third of Spring Kite Farms goes to the farm’s CSA, or Community Supported Agriculture, clients. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:46 pm

Within the local food movement, the community-supported agriculture (CSA) model is highly valued. You buy a share of a farmer’s produce up-front as a shareholder, then if all goes well, you reap the rewards at harvest time.

But running a CSA can bring with it some tricky business decisions.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Harvest Public Media’s Luke Runyon reports.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Barnes & Noble CEO Resigns

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:46 pm

Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch Jr. has resigned. The company has faced poor earnings reports and recently announced that it would stop manufacturing its own e-reader, the Nook.

What do these changes mean for Barnes & Noble, and booksellers?

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NPR Story
12:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Cory Doctorow To Young Readers: Hold Government Accountable

Art by Yuko Shimizu on the cover of Cory Doctorow's "Homeland." (Tor Books)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:15 pm

In the best selling books “Little Brother” and “Homeland,” Cory Doctorow uses his hero, teenage hacktivist Marcus Yallow, to get young people to think about privacy, civil liberties and the duties of the citizen in the age of the Internet.

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NPR Story
12:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Citizen Journalist Killed In Syria

Syrian citizen journalist Fidaa al-Baali is pictured with his camera and a group of children. (Activists News Association/Facebook)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:46 pm

Fidaa al-Baali was a trusted source for international journalists.  He used his video camera to document the Syrian war and anti-government protests. Baali died last Friday.

We talk about his contributions, and have an update of the continuing upheaval in his country.


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NPR Story
12:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Kentucky Senate Race Will Be One Of 2014's Most Watched

U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, left, and his challenger, Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:46 pm

Republican Mitch McConnell first won election to the Senate nearly 30 years ago, in 1984. This year he faces a Democrat who was born just a few years before McConnell took office, 34-year-old Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

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NPR Story
2:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Andy Murray Ends Britain's 77-Year Wimbledon Wait

Andy Murray of Britain poses with the trophy after defeating Novak Djokovic of Serbia during the Men's singles final match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, Sunday, July 7, 2013. (Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP)

After 77 years, a British man finally won Wimbledon. Andy Murray beat Novak Djokovic in three straight sets.

When it was over, Murray acted as if he couldn’t quite believe it, and most of Britain felt the same way.

Michael Goldfarb is a longtime public radio journalist who has been living in Britain for a third of that 77-year wait. Over the years, Goldfarb has vowed that he will leave Britain if a Brit ever won Wimbledon.

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NPR Story
2:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Pokey LaFarge's Love Song To The Midwest

Musician and songwriter Pokey LaFarge is based in St. Louis, Missouri. (Joshua Black Wilkins)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:50 pm

Stephen Thompson, writer and editor for NPR Music, brings us a new song each week.

This week he introduces us to the music of musician and songwriter Pokey LaFarge, with his new song “Central Time” from his self titled album.

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NPR Story
2:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Egyptian Americans React To Political Upheaval

Abrar Rageh is a junior scientist at University of Minnesota. (Abrar Rageh/LinkedIn)

More than 50 supporters of ousted president Mohammed Morsi were killed in an outburst of violence around the time of morning prayers on Monday, according to Egypt’s state news agency.

The violence erupted outside of the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, where Morsi supports were holding a sit-in to demand his release. He’s under house arrest.

With so much in flux, what is it like for Egyptian Americans to watch this unfold? We hear from Abrar Rageh, a junior scientist at the University of Minnesota in the department of Opthamology.

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NPR Story
12:47 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

How To Garden In Drought And Heat

A volunteer at the USDA People's Garden tends to garlic. (Lance Cheung/USDA)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:27 pm

With much of the country under drought conditions and temperatures soaring in the rest of the country, what is a backyard gardener to do?

Ahmed Hassan is a professional landscaper and former host of Turf Wars and Yard Crashers on the DIY network and HGTV. Hassan told Here & Now that the most important things to think about when prepping your garden for drought are the type of plants you use and how you treat your soil.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Buddhist Monk Confronts Japan's Suicide Culture

Alarmed by a rise in people jumping to their deaths in front of trains, Japanese railway operators are installing special blue lights above station platforms they hope will have a soothing effect and reduce suicides, Oct. 14, 2009. (Itsuo Inouye/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:27 pm

Japan’s suicide rate is twice that of the United States. More than 30,000 people a year kill themselves in Japan.

So many people jump in front of subway trains that when a train stops between stations, people just assume it’s a suicide.

A Buddhist monk, Ittetsu Nemoto, decided he wanted to do something about that. He now works with depressed Japanese people who make the journey to his temple.

Larissa MacFarquhar, a staff writer for The New Yorker, wrote about Nemoto in a recent issue.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Fears Of Civil War In Egypt After 'Massacre'

An Egyptian man cries outside a morgue after carrying the corpse of his brother killed near the Republican Guard building in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 8, 2013. (Manu Brabo/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:27 pm

The only Islamist group to join the military in deposing the elected government of Mohammed Morsi says it will withdraw its support for the transition plan in response to what it calls a “massacre” of pro-Morsi supporters.

Egypt’s state news agency says at least 51 civilians are dead and over 400 injured after the Egyptian army opened fire on hundreds of Islamists who had been holding a sit-in outside the offices of the Republican Guard in Cairo.

The protesters were demanding that the army reinstate Mohammed Morsi to the presidency.

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NPR Story
7:20 am
Sat July 6, 2013

Trayvon Martin’s Mother Testifies At Zimmerman Trial

Sybrina Fulton, the mother of slain teenager Trayvon Martin, testified this morning in the ongoing trial of George Zimmerman. Zimmerman is charged with second degree murder in Martin’s death. Martin’s parents have been in the court every day of the trial.

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NPR Story
5:20 am
Sat July 6, 2013

Wimbledon 'Upsets' Get Linguist Thinking

Serena Williams lost in the early rounds of Wimbledon. (AP)

It’s down to the wire at Wimbledon, the men’s finals are on Sunday, the women’s on Saturday. And some of the biggest names will not be participating, because there have been a lot of upsets—Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova all lost in the early rounds. These upsets had linguist Ben Zimmer thinking about the use of the word “upset.”

And that got him thinking about a horse race in 1919.

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NPR Story
5:19 am
Sat July 6, 2013

Creating Art, On An Etch A Sketch

Etch A Sketch art by Andrea Tilden. (Andrea Tilden/Facebook)
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