Intersection

Each week, our host Sara Shahriari sits down with community members to discuss issues concerning mid-Missourians. From politics, to local art to social issues, anything that generates good conversations and affects our community is on the table.

To hear the conversations, simply tune in to KBIA 91.3 FM on Mondays between 6:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m. You can hear the show on the radio or through the live stream on kbia.org. If you miss an episode, you can always catch up with the conversations here, or subscribe to our show through iTunes or any podcast app.

Don't forget to connect with us on Facebook or Twitter and tell us what local issues matter to you. 

See the show archives on the Intersection website.

This week on Intersection we bring you a special on homelessness from Missouri Health Talks. Health reporter Rebecca Smith spoke with Jennifer Carter Dochler, the Public Policy Director for the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence and the Vice Chair of the Governor’s Committee to End Homelessness.

Smith was also joined by Teresa and Frankie Graham, the resident manager and a longtime volunteer at Harvest House – a local homeless shelter in Boonville.

They spoke about the state of homelessness in Missouri, how homelessness looks the same and different in rural and urban areas, what is being done to combat the problem and what individuals can do to help.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Kristofor Husted/KBIA

Today, we’re bringing you United and Divided, a series of stories on bridging the urban-rural divide. It's reported by Harvest Public Media.

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election one thing is clear: rural America and urban America see things differently. In this series of profiles, Harvest Public Media reporters introduce us to our fellow Americans and examine the issues that they hold dear. We re-discover the ties that bind us and learn more about the lines that divide us. And through these voices, we come to know Americans just a little bit better.

Reporters from Missouri, Colorado, Iowa and Nebraska explore topics causing rift in the country, and how those differences define the future. They looked at schools, religion, immigration and trade policy. 


Courtesy Anton Treuer and Bemidji State University

November is Native American Heritage Month. This week author and professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University Anton Treuer talks with host Sara Shahriari. MU professor of digital storytelling and citizen of Cherokee Nation Joseph Erb joins in the wide-ranging conversation on language's role in maintaining a culture, Truer's book Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask, and the damage done by some mascots that mimic Native Americans. 


Sara Shahriari/KBIA

This week on intersection we are joined by Dr. Rebecca Johnson. She is the Millsap Professor of Gerontological Nursing and Public Policy Professor at the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing. She's also a professor and serves as the director of the Research Center for Human Animal Interaction in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Johnson researches how people and pets interact, including the beneficial effects animals can have on people and the science behind it all.


Beatriz Costa-Lima / KBIA

Welcome Home is a transitional emergency and service center for veterans. The organization has been operating in Columbia for more than 25 years, and recently expanded. The mission? To reduce veteran homelessness by helping people gain housing, services and skills to form stable lives. 

Intersection's Sara Shahriari sat down with Timothy Rich, the executive director of Welcome Home, to learn about the organization and its new facilities.


Photo courtesy of T.J. Thomson

This week on Intersection we are joined by Jim Obergefell , who was the plaintiff in the landmark Supreme Court case that legalized same-sex marriage. Obergefell visited the University of Missouri earlier this month to present a lecture called “Love Wins” for a symposium on the Science of Love. Timothy Blair also joined the conversation. Blair is an alumnus of the Missouri School of Journalism, and in 2015 he donated $1 million to create the Timothy D. Blair Fund for LGBT Coverage in Journalism. 

KBIA

Early last month, President Donald Trump announced he would end a federal program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. It's a program created in 2012 when then President Barack Obama signed an executive order. DACA protects nearly 800,000 people around the United States who were brought here as children without documentation, giving them a chance to work or study without the risk of deportation. Missouri has about 3,500 DACA recipients, and nearly half of them are students.

KBIA’s Hannah Haynes talked with two DACA recipients in Missouri and looked at what the Trump administration's changes to the program could mean for young immigrants.


Missouri Task Force One

Missouri Task Force One is an urban search and rescue team that responds to disasters around the country. There are just 28 such units nationwide, and the Missouri force is managed by the Boone County Fire Protection District. A Missouri Task Force One team recently returned to Columbia from Texas after helping with Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. 

Intersection's Sara Shahriari sat down with two members from the task force, Terry Cassil and Danny Mueller, to hear about their experiences. 


Benjamin Hoste

Lead has played a pivotal role in the history of Missouri. More than 17 million tons of lead have come out of the ground in the state over the last 300 years, and that's left a lasting impact on the state economically, environmentally and culturally. KBIA is exploring that history —and future—in our special series The Legacy of Lead.


Benjamin Hoste

Next week on Intersection, we look at Missouri's legacy of lead. In this preview of our upcoming show, Intersection host Sara Shahriari talks with photographer Benjamin Hoste about his images from Missouri's old lead belt. 

Hoste's photographs from the old lead belt are on display at the Greg Hardwick Gallery at Columbia College through September 27.

Sara Shahriari / KBIA

Intersection is marking the new school year with conversations with three MU professors whose work and teaching styles make then stand out. We learn that parts of Missouri were once on the coast of a huge inland sea, how a veterinarian and toxicologist gets to the bottom of mysterious ailments and how students are learning to understand the global market for fabrics. 


Dr. John Dane, left, wears glasses, a dark blue suit and a white and blue-checkered shirt. Gary Harbison, right, has a full beard and wears a dark blue shirt and suit.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

This week on Intersection we bring you a special on oral health from the new KBIA project, Missouri Health Talks. Health reporter Rebecca Smith spoke with Dr. John Dane, the current State Dental Director, and Gary Harbison, the Executive Director for the Missouri Coalition for Oral Health.

They cover the Missouri Oral Health Plan, which runs from 2015 to 2020, advances that have been made in oral health policy and struggles Missourians still face when it comes to accessing quality, affordable dental care.

You will also hear conversations gathered by Smith in June at the 6th Annual MOMOM, or Missouri Mission of Mercy, in Joplin. This yearly, two-day dental clinic put on by the Missouri Dental Association provides free dental care for anyone willing to wait in line. This year approximately 1,200 people were served and more than $800,000 worth of care was provided.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Nathan Lawrence

Central Missouri is on the path of totality for the upcoming solar eclipse. That means that the sun will completely disappear from view for a few minutes during the middle of the day. Intersection's Sara Shahriari and Harvest Public Media reporter Kris Husted talk with Mizzou Professor and Director of Astronomy Angela Speck about studying animal reactions, citizen data gathering and exactly how the moon and the sun line up to create daytime darkness. 

This week on Intersection we are joined by William Trogdon, who writes under the name William Least Heat-Moon, to discuss his new novel, “Celestial Mechanics.”

 

The novel follows Silas Fortunato, an amateur astronomer, through a serious accident and life-changing relationships with three women. The novel is set in a place inspired by Columbia and Boone County. Heat-Moon is also the author of books including “Blue Highways” and “PrairyErth”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listen here:


This week on Intersection, we continue our look at Columbia's new Unified Development Ordinance. 

Listen here:


This week on Intersection, Columbia Mayor Brian Treece joins us to discuss the Unified Development Ordinance, which took effect at the end of March. The new zoning code is the biggest comprehensive reform to zoning in Columbia since the 1950s. Treece says some of the changes include strengthening protections for neighborhoods and increasing parking requirements for large residential developments.

Listen here: 


Claire Banderas / KBIA

This week on Intersection, representatives from the College Language Association, or CLA, join us to discuss its yearly convention, which was held in Columbia late last week. The CLA was founded in 1937, when black professors and scholars were looking for research and publication opportunities, but weren't welcomed into other professional organizations. The panel discussed the importance of maintaining the organization’s history of diversity and inclusion. Dr. Clément Akassi is the president of the association, Dr. Donna Harper is the vice president. Dr.

Columbia's First Ward City Council candidates joined us to share their priorities. The election is April 4. Candidates discussed their views on housing, infrastructure, community policing and social equity.

 

 


 

Columbia City Council elections for the Fifth and First Wards are April 4. This week, Intersection talked with the Fifth Ward City Council Candidates, Arthur Jago and Matt Pitzer. The candidates discuss issues including safety, policing, development and city growth.

 

 

 

 

 

Listen to the full episode here:

Dr.Farouk / Flickr

This week on Intersection, we talk with KBIA health reporter Bram Sable-Smith about possible changes to healthcare in Missouri. One change could come this Thursday, when the U.S. House is scheduled to vote on the American Health Care Act. This bill is the GOP’s proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. We discuss what the changes proposed in the GOP replacement bill could mean for Missouri, especially for people in rural parts of our state. 

Listen to the full episode here: 


This week on Intersection, we talk about the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veteran's Hospital's new patient education center and the hospital's patient-centered approach. Our guests are Communications Specialist Heather Brown, Health Promotion Disease Prevention Program Manager Jennifer Schmidt, Public Affairs Officer Stephen Gaither and MOVE! program participant and veteran Kent Lewis.

Listen to the full episode here: 


This week on Intersection, we listen to the first episode of the new True/False Podcast presented by KBIA. Host Allison Coffelt talks with directors Keith Fulton and Lou Pepe about their film The Bad Kids and the process of developing character in nonfiction film.

 

 

Listen to the full show here:


True False logo
File Photo / KBIa

This week on Intersection, we speak with the directors of several films in the 2017 True/False Film Festival. This year’s festival marks the thirteenth consecutive gathering of documentary filmmakers in Columbia. Conversations include Hebert Peck of I Am Not Your Negro and Petra and Peter Lataster, directors of Miss Kiet’s Children.

Listen to the full show here: 


This week on Intersection, we talk with Clarence Lang, Professor of African and African-American Studies at The University of Kansas. Lang’s book, Grass Roots at the Gateway: Class, Politics and Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis from 1936-1975, explores St. Louis as an intersection of culture, economy and civil rights movements.

Listen to the full story here:


This week on Intersection, we talk with Representative Cheri Toalson Reisch about her first session in the Missouri General Assembly. Republican Reisch represents District 44, which includes Northeast Columbia, Hallsville, Sturgeon and Centralia.The seat was formerly occupied by Caleb Rowden, who now occupies the 19th District seat in the Missouri Senate.

Listen to the full show here:


KBIA

This week on Intersection, we talk with three MU professors about their teaching and research in and outside of the classroom. From the First Amendment and social media to what superheroes can teach us about American history, we're learning from some of our region's fascinating  educators.  

Listen to the full show here: 


Patrick Breitenbach / Flickr

This week on Intersection we talk with three students from the University of Missouri. Last fall Autumn Gholston, Daniel Litwin, Nora Thiemann and about 20 other students spent the semester exploring how to tell stories using sound in a digital storytelling class.

In this episode we hear audio essays these three students produced about everything from friendship to surviving a tornado, and talk with them about stepping outside their comfort zones, writing in new ways and putting their storytelling skills to work.

Listen to the whole show here: 


7mary3 / FLICKR

This week on Intersection, we continue exploring what community policing looks like in Columbia, and where ideas about community policing come from. We talk with Daniel Isom, a former chief of police and professor of policing and the community at the University of Missouri in St. Louis, and with Clint Sinclair, the Columbia Police Department's LGBT liaison.  We also learn how  Columbia police officers are trained to identify bias when we sit in on an open-to-the-public version of the department's community policing training.

Through our conversations, we learn about the origins of community policing and how it's developing in Columbia. Listen to the full story: 


Bram Sable Smith

This week on Intersection, we talk with Caleb Rowden, the newly elected Missouri State Senator for District 19, which is made up of Boone and Cooper Counties. Rowden will replace two-term District 19 Republican Sen. Kurt Schaefer. We talk about Rowden’s tight race again Democrat Stephen Webber, healthcare, the University of Missouri, Planned Parenthood, ethics reform and his goals for the next four years.

Listen to the full story here: 


7mary3 / FLICKR

This week on Intersection, we talk with  Sgt. Mike Hestir of the Columbia Police Department's Community Outreach Unit,  and Lorenzo Lawson, the executive director of the Youth Empowerment Zone.

We explore what community policing looks like in Columbia, how the Outreach Unit began and Hestir and Lawson's hopes for the future. 

Listen to the whole show here, and read brief excerpts from our interviews below. 


Pages