Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm-6:30pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

A daily program about business and finance, it's a fresh way of reporting business & finance subjects to the general listener. Putting a human face on the global economy, the program illuminates the ways that international business and finance relate to listeners' daily lives.

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Marketplace for Tuesday, July 7, 2015

2 hours ago

Airing on Tuesday, July 7, 2015: Greece’s economy is terrible, almost like a country’s that just lost a war. But say Greece got to hit a reset button. What would it have going for it? We survey its natural and human assets.

PODCAST: Unlimited vacation

13 hours ago
Mark Garrison

Driving could remain quite cheap going into this fall, with crude oil prices down 7 percent from before the July 4th weekend. More on that. Plus, Greeks don’t have access to online payment systems like Paypal. We look at why that matters. And what would happen if companies offered employees unlimited vacation?

Fast-changing metrics may spoil FOMC minutes

13 hours ago
Tim Fitzsimons

On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve releases notes from its last Open Market Committee meeting. Usually that’s a time for Fed watchers to comb through the details to try to divine what the Fed may do regarding its promise to raise interest rates. But this time it should be a little anticlimactic (and it's not because the Fed ended its June meeting with a press conference, taking the wind out of the sails of this batch of meeting minutes). 

Airing on Tuesday, July 7, 2015: On today's show, we'll have an update on the situation in Greece, the future of U.S. interest rates, and the best-of-the-best piece of equipment if one is a professional ballet dancer.

 

 

Marketplace Tech for Tuesday, July 7, 2015

14 hours ago
Marketplace

Airing on Tuesday, July 7, 2015: First up, we'll talk about why the Greeks don't have access to online payment systems like Paypal, and why it matters. We'll also talk to Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union, about the private companies that are changing the way spyware gets bought and sold. And Andrew Lih, Associate professor of journalism at American University and author of "The Wikipedia Revolution: How a bunch of nobodies created the world’s greatest encyclopedia," explains what happens when a community-driven site revolts.

Unlimited vacation anyone?

14 hours ago
Mark Garrison

An American company offering unlimited vacation sounds like an unthinkable fantasy in a country famed for stingy time-off policies compared with other Western countries. But unlimited time off policies are a reality at a small number of American companies. And the results that they’re getting have other businesses taking a look.

23andMe believes genetics are the future of health

Jul 6, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Julian Burrell

Genetic data has a lot of medical implications for everyone. Genes can explain your current state of health, your ancestry, even what sorts of diseases you may be more susceptible to.

The DNA service company 23andMe wants to collect all of that valuable data and use it to tell customers more about their health.

"I really believe that we’re trying to do things that democratize health care for people," says Anne Wojcicki, 23andMe CEO.

Marketplace for Monday, July 6, 2015

Jul 6, 2015

Airing on Monday, July 6, 2015: An audit of Blue Shield of California faulted the nonprofit health insurer for amassing a $4 billion surplus while failing to offer more affordable rates. The audit, the details of which were reported in the Los Angeles Times, was one reason California revoked Blue Shield’s tax exemption. It raises the question of how big health insurers ended up with nonprofit status in the first place, and what does that mean for customers today? Next: China’s markets have become so frothy that the government has tried to calm them.

Chicago schools face $200 million in cuts

Jul 6, 2015
Nova Safo

The city of Chicago is cutting its public school budget by $200 million after making a major payment into its teachers' pension system.

The move comes just a couple of years after the city closed almost 50 elementary schools, in what was at the time a historic number of public school closures.

Still, the school district's budget problems persist.

"Chicago Public Schools faces a significant budget crisis," says Sarah Wetmore of the Chicago-based Civic Federation, a government watchdog group. Wetmore says the city's schools have had deficits that won't go away.

Reduce, reuse...rethink?

Jul 6, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

Plastic foam is perfectly recyclable. There are machines the size of a refrigerator which can melt it down into blocks that can then be shipped to China and used to make patio furniture. Manufacturers who deal with large amounts of the stuff do recycle it, but in general, consumers don’t.

Why not? The economics just don’t work.   

Its density is low, it’s often dirty and the price one can get for those blocks shipped off to China is not lucrative enough to motivate cities or recyclers to collect and recycle it.

Marketplace Tech for Monday, July 6, 2015

Jul 6, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Monday, July 6, 2015: First up, Gregory Rosston, Deputy Director and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, talks about the AT&T and DirecTV merger. We'll also speak with Christopher Koopman, research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, about San Francisco’s attempts to rein in Airbnb hosts. We'll also be joined by Alexa Clay and Kyra Maya Phillips, authors of "The Misfit Economy: Lessons in Creativity from Pirates, Hackers, Gangsters and Other Informal Entrepreneurs."

Molly Wood

Most people aren't paying for things with their phones just yet. If you are, maybe you're just getting used to using your fingerprint to authorize a transaction.

MasterCard is blazing right ahead with an app that will let you pay for items with your face.

Technically, you pay using your MasterCard, obviously. But to authorize your mobile payment, you look at your camera's selfie cam and blink once to prove you're a human.

The FCC is busy enforcing net neutrality

Jul 3, 2015
Molly Wood

The Federal Communications Commission has now been in the business of enforcing net neutrality for a little less than a month and it's been busy. The FCC promptly fined AT&T $100 million for throttling some users unlimited data access. Sprint said it would stop doing the same thing now that the new rules are in effect. 

One formal net neutrality complaint has already been filed, and businesses and the government are trying to figure out what the Internet service game looks like now.

Molly Wood

It’s a holiday weekend, but there's still news to unpack before the Fourth of July barbecues can get started. Catherine Rampell from the Washington Post and Sudeep Reddy from the Wall Street Journal join Molly for this installment of the Weekly Wrap.

In the headlines:

The University of Washington lowers its tuition.

Marketplace for Friday, July 3, 2015

Jul 3, 2015

On today's show wrap up: the week's business news, a look at Phil Knight's impact on Nike, and we contemplate a massive heath care merger. Plus: a conversation with FCC chair Tom Wheeler and the new Battle of the Alamo.

PODCAST: Theme park traffic

Jul 3, 2015
David Brancaccio

On today's show, more on the shrinking stock market in Shanghai, which took a tumble today. Plus, we're headed into the thick of theme park season, and around the country-parks are adding new attractions, scarier rollar coasters, and wilder rides. We take a closer look at the role of a new ride in driving theme park traffic.

What's holding back wearable tech?

Jul 3, 2015
Nova Safo

Personal health and wellness technologies are projected to be a $5 billion business this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association

Even President Barack Obama wears a wearable wellness device — a Fitbit — on occasion.

But, as it turns out, wearable technologies have a big obstacle to overcome: sensors — the miniaturized devices that measure things like speed and motion.

Airing on Friday, July 3, 2015: With Greeks heading to the polls on Sunday, the IMF is saying Greece needs $66 billion over the next and more flexibility from its lenders. More on that. Plus ... they’re back! And they’ve got their eyes on you. In an effort to reduce “shrinkage”, aka shoplifting, Wal-Mart brings greeters back to the front of the store. Seems that simple act of being seen and greeted as you walk into a store, may cut down on your urge to take a five-finger discount.

Philadelphia: the largest city to legalize Airbnb

Jul 3, 2015
Gigi Douban

Philadelphia has legalized Airbnb and agreed to tax rentals booked through the site. The city is preparing itself for two huge events — The 2016 Democratic National Convention a year from now. But first up, the pope’s visit.

According to Philadelphia’s tourism bureau, more than 1.5 million visitors are expected to descend on the city for the Papal event.

Marketplace for Thursday, July 2, 2015

Jul 2, 2015

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: One of Chicago's remaining black-owned banks is in danger of closing, a reality that's part of a national trend. Unlike the more segregated days when these banks were founded, African-American customers can now take their business elsewhere. But black-owned banks provide a link to a proud history, and research says, they may do something a lot more important. Marketplace's Dan Weissmann has the story. Next: forget the baking soda volcano.

U.S. Army recruits young innovators

Jul 2, 2015
Amy Scott

In a hotel in suburban Baltimore, kids file into a conference room wearing Army-issued white lab coats and safety goggles. The middle schoolers are among the finalists in the U.S. Army’s annual eCYBERMISSION STEM fair—20 teams selected from more than 7,000 around the country for their problem-solving projects.

Before the big competition, they break into small groups for some training.

What's your financial legacy?

Jul 2, 2015
Marketplace Weekend Staff

Next week, we're talking about legacies on the show. We want to hear your stories of financial legacies: what's your legacy? How will you be remebered? Maybe you have a legacy without an heir, maybe you're building something for your future....

We want to know. Tell us about the economic legacies in your life.

PODCAST: Rice in Cuba

Jul 2, 2015
David Brancaccio

It would appear people are dropping out of the American labor force in spite of new jobs created. More on that. Plus, as the U.S. announces plans to open a full embassy in Cuba, we look at the American rice industry, which is poised to benefit from more normalized relations, and ask how they’re preparing for changes ahead between the two countries. And with the Greek economy nearly immobilized by its debt, and Puerto Rico close to default, does the U.S. have lessons to learn from these situations? Marketplace's senior economics correspondent Chris Farrell weighs in.

Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: Major U.S. airlines are the subject of a federal investigation by the Department of Justice looking into whether they may be illegally coordinating to keep ticket prices up. More on that. Plus, we'll talk about New York City's ban on so-called “poor doors,” the separate entrances to mixed-income buildings that were to be used by lower-income residents. Plus, a conversation with Elizabeth Holmes, who at 31 is the youngest female, self-made multi-billionaire in America, according to Forbes.

Marketplace for Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Jul 1, 2015

Airing on Wednesday, July 1, 2015: Puerto Rico is in dire financial straits.  So what, you might shrug. Well, if any of your money is invested in a municipal bond fund, you might own Puerto Rican bonds, and they could take a hit. Marketplace's Adam Allington finds out who’s vulnerable. Next: Speaking today in Tennessee, President Obama will try to court conservative states to expand Medicaid under Obamacare. We unpack his sales pitch on using federal dollars to help states’ bottom lines.

Ford and Chrysler sales kicked into gear for June

Jul 1, 2015
Mark Garrison

Two of the Big Three American automakers — Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and Ford Motor Co. — are reporting nice gains in their June sales, according to numbers out Wednesday. A stronger job market and easy access to credit are spurring many Americans to trade up from the older cars in their garages.

But that’s not the only reason carmakers are happy these days. A booming housing market is also a factor: contractors are breaking ground on more homes, which means they’re buying more trucks.

Jeff Tyler

Just like the lottery, sports contracts can pay more when the profits are spread out over time. For example, let’s consider two of, arguably, the most bone-headed (or brilliant?) sports contracts of all time. The deal to fold the St. Louis Spirits has been called one of the best sports deals of all time. The contract has been so profitable that it’s used as a textbook example by business school professors. During basketball season, the deal inspires sports reporters to ask, “Would you believe a team that doesn’t exist still makes $17 million a year?”

PODCAST: The strong dollar

Jul 1, 2015
David Brancaccio

With emergency funding drying up, the Greek government sends a letter to creditors saying it might accept terms of a bailout. More on that. We'll also talk to Allan Sloan of the Washington Post about how the strong dollar is ironically helping U.S. businesses.

Airing on Wednesday, July 1, 2015: Greece's prime minister has reportedly sent a letter to the European Commission agreeing to most of Europe's conditions for a financial bailout. We'll talk to Elena Panaritis, chief economic adviser to the Greek Ministry of Finance, for more. Plus, starting Wednesday, career and vocational programs are facing tougher regulations that have been years in the making. The new so-called “gainful employment” rule is meant to crack down on programs that load students up with debt for courses that don’t lead to decent jobs.

Amy Scott

Starting Wednesday, career and vocational programs are facing tougher regulations that have been years in the making. The new so-called “gainful employment” rule is meant to crack down on programs that load students up with debt for courses that don’t lead to decent jobs. The rules especially target for-profit colleges, which often make close to 90 percent of their revenue from taxpayer dollars.

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