Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm-6:30pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

A daily program about business and finance, it's a fresh way of reporting business & finance subjects to the general listener. Putting a human face on the global economy, the program illuminates the ways that international business and finance relate to listeners' daily lives.

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Food industry plays it both ways with GMO labels

13 hours ago
Annie Baxter

Reed Grimm believes nature knows best. So when he shops with his nieces at the Mississippi Market Natural Foods Co-op in St. Paul, Minnesota, he only goes for organic fruits, and he looks for products that say "non-GMO."

“We want to eat things that are natural, that are just coming straight out of the earth like it has been for milennia," says Grimm, a musician who lives in a Twin Cities suburb. "Nature knows what it's doing."

The 'bring your own billionaire' election

13 hours ago
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

The 2016 presidential candidates are competing for the support of very rich donors.  Some of these donors have become household names, but others are relatively unknown -- billionaires like Joe Ricketts and his family, who’ve become quite active political donors over the past few election cycles.

Marketplace for Tuesday, August 4, 2015

13 hours ago

If you're a government enterprise, what's the surest way to get Congress to leave you alone? Make lots and lots of money. Plus, in environmental news, there's one loser in the Obama Administration’s rules for limiting carbon-dioxide emissions: natural gas. 

PODCAST: Hiring local

23 hours ago
Molly Wood

On Wall Street, analysts are digesting ongoing problems with the Chinese market, as well as the volatile oil market. More on that. Plus, we'll talk about CVS's business model as it turns itself into something of a health brand. Plus, Nashville voters are considering an amendment this summer has become surprisingly contentious: It would require big public construction projects to hire Nashville residents for 40 percent of worker hours. 

Banking on a New Orleans recovery

Aug 4, 2015
Noel King and Caitlin Esch

Alden McDonald, the President and CEO of Liberty Bank, takes a pair of work boots from the trunk of his car and paces the perimeter of a branch that's under construction in New Orleans' Gentilly neighborhood. He lobs question after question at his contractors: what's the square footage on the restrooms? Where will the tellers sit? Is it possible to remove one wall and add some open space? McDonald is nothing if not persistent. It's a character trait that helped when Liberty faced its most trying time.

Airing on Tuesday, August 4, 2015: On today's show, we'll talk about oil's new volatility with prices creeping back up after falling to a six month low on Monday. And with CVS’s earnings report on Tuesday, we check on the corporate strategy that has helped CVS shares approach record highs. Plus, nearly ten years ago, New Orleans was inundated by flood waters, after a spectacular failure of the city's levees. We have the story of a financial institution — itself devastated — that played a key role in the rebuilding.

Dan Weissmann

The pharmacy counter was always in the back of a CVS for a reason. 

As Charles Rhyee, a Cowen and Company analyst, puts it, "They’re hoping that on your way out, you’ll realize, ‘Hey, I need some toothpaste. Or maybe I’ll pick up a newspaper or some gum at the front.' And all of those are actually higher-margin items" than just picking up a prescription.

Men responsible for your office chills

Aug 3, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

The newspaper of record explains why women are more often cold in office buildings than men are.

Marketplace for Monday, August 3, 2015

Aug 3, 2015

The word of the day today? De-carbonization. Look it up if you don't believe us. And, AT&T and DirecTV's recently announced TV and mobile phone service bundle could change the way cable companies do business. 

Don't blame millennials for their financial woes

Aug 3, 2015
Janet Nguyen

Despite attaining higher education levels than previous generations, millennials are earning significantly less money, according to the New York Times — and the future looks bleak.

PODCAST: Electric car pollution

Aug 3, 2015
Molly Wood

On today's show, we'll talk about the new consumer spending numbers out for June — they were the lowest they've been in four months. Plus, for some years now driving an electric car has been viewed by many as the ultimate badge of environmental consciousness. Yet, a growing body of research now suggests that electric cars might actually produce more pollution than a comparable gasoline-powered car. 

How leasing boosted the auto industry

Aug 3, 2015
Dan Weissmann

Analysts expect car sales to set ten-year records this summer, part of a trend that is two or three years in the making. Lots of factors contribute, including low interest rates and a decent job market, but one in particular caught our eye: the rise of leasing. 

It’s a piece of marketing genius.

As Edmunds.com analyst Jessica Caldwell explains it, "Leasing guarantees that someone’s going to need a new car in two or three years, when their lease expires."

The strategy goes back to the recession, when new car sales were in the toilet.  

Your electric car may be a carbon polluter

Aug 3, 2015
Adam Allington

For some years now, driving an electric car has been viewed by many as the ultimate badge of environmental consciousness. If you just look at the car, electric vehicles are about as clean as they come — no combustion engine, no emissions. But that doesn’t mean they don’t contribute to pollution.

Electric cars run on electricity, and the great majority of electricity is created at power plants. Depending on where you live, generating the electricity for your electric car may create more carbon emissions than a standard gasoline engine.

A giant robot that shoots ... T-shirts?

Jul 31, 2015
Molly Wood

If the whole idea of creating a new sports entertainment league that will rival the UFC, WWE and NASCAR for sheer dollars, excitement and danger doesn't work out, the MegaBots can always do parties. It turns out that a MegaBot is a really good T-shirt cannon.

MegaBots is a startup, based in Oakland, California, doing the kind of work a lot of kids hope to be doing someday, too: building a 15-foot tall, 15,000-pound fighting robot, and hoping it'll become the centerpiece of a new global entertainment business.

The minimum wage debate

Jul 31, 2015
Marketplace Weekend Staff

Next weekend on Marketplace, guest host David Lazarus will take a look at the debate behind the minimum wage across the U.S. Does the minimum wage force companies to layoff low-paid employees? Or is a living wage fair to employees?

Have you ever lived on the minimum wage in your area? We want to hear your stories. Send us an email or reach us on Twitter, @MarketplaceWKND

Marketplace for Friday, July 31, 2015

Jul 31, 2015

Airing on Friday, July 31, 2015: Have you gotten a raise lately? The Federal Reserve is interested. And boutique studio SoulCycle pedals hard toward an IPO.

The state of the market for consumer robots

Jul 31, 2015
Molly Wood and Jenny Ament

The personal helper bot is the holy grail of our robot fantasies. What's the state of the market for consumer robots, whether they're humanoid or social? Senior tech correspondent Molly Wood spoke to Dan Kara, who studies robotics at the tech market intelligence firm ABI Research. Plus, hear what people in downtown L.A. would want their personal robots to do for them and what they would pay for it. Kara weighs in on just how realistic our fantasies are.

PODCAST: Tuning with the push of a button

Jul 31, 2015
David Brancaccio

With another deadline on Monday for Puerto Rico to repay $60 million to bond holders, we take a look at the economic challenges for the commonwealth as tourism dips. Plus, we'll talk about Wall Streets' workout — two major fitness companies are planning IPOs. And a Nashville instrument maker has spent millions of dollars over the course of a decade trying to perfect the self-tuning guitar. But this year, Gibson started making automatic tuners a standard feature on most of its electric guitars.

Andy Uhler

Puerto Rico has debt problems; it's even been called the "Greece of the Americas." On Monday, the Puerto Rican government is due to repay another $60 million to bond holders, and the government is already preparing statements, assuming it won’t have the cash.  

It wouldn’t technically be a default. These are moral obligation bonds, so they don’t have legal repercussions for nonpayment. But it’s not just banks and bondholders who are affected.

Marketplace Tech for Friday, July 31, 2015

Jul 31, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Friday, July 31, 2015: First up, we'll talk to Stephen Cobb, security researcher at ESET North America, about the Black Hat hacking conference. Plus, Annalee Newitz, Editor-in-Chief at Gizmodo, joins us to talk about the death of Google Plus. And how well have you kept up with the week in tech news? It's time for Silicon Tally! This week, host Ben Johnson takes on Aaron Harris, a partner at Y Combinator and host of Startup School Radio.

While my guitar gently tunes itself

Jul 31, 2015
Emil Moffatt

Gibson has spent millions of dollars over the course of a decade trying to perfect the self-tuning guitar. But it wasn’t until this year the brand behind the iconic Les Paul started making automatic tuners a standard feature on most of its electric guitars.

With one press of a button, tiny motors twist the tuning pegs and within seconds, the guitar is ready to play. The tuner is a small black box tucked out of sight, above the neck at the head of the guitar.

Marketplace for Thursday, July 30, 2015

Jul 30, 2015

Airing on Thursday, July 30, 2015: The unregulated industry of occupational licensing and tech's survival of the biggest.

The obsession with tech-company growth

Jul 30, 2015
Adrienne Hill

Facebook is out with second quarter earnings, and the company reported steady growth in revenue and its user base. Twitter and Yelp, on the other hand, disappointed investors with growth numbers.

Not to be too dramatic about it, but if you're a tech company, it's pretty much grow or die.

Airing on Friday, July 31, 2015: On today's show, we'll talk with Tracey Samuelson, who reports from Maui on what could be the final day of Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations. We'll also talk about news that Beijing will host the 2022 Winter Olympics. 

Airing on Thursday, July 30, 2015: With news that a piece of an aircraft that has washed up on Reunion in the Indian Ocean may be from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, we'll talk about how the airline has been handling a disastrous year. Plus, on Medicare’s 50th anniversary, we look at what Medicare is spending most on. We'll also speak with senior economics contributor Chris Farrell about a trend towards fostering creativity within the aging boomer population.

At 50, Medicare spending more on hospice

Jul 30, 2015
Annie Baxter

Fifty years into the Medicare program, the federal health insurance program for Americans 65 and older, one feature has remained fairly constant: About 25 percent of spending goes to care in the last year of life. 

“This is actually a statistic that has been remarkably stable from year to year. It hasn't changed very much,” says Tricia Neuman, director of the Medicare Policy program at the Kaiser Family Foundation. 

Marketplace Tech for Thursday, July 30, 2015

Jul 30, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 30, 2015: First up, we'll talk to Brian Blau, research director at Gartner, on Facebook earnings. We'll also speak with Minds.com founder Bill Ottman about an anti-Facebook social network with open source code and strict privacy policies that protect user data. And Farhad Manjoo, tech columnist at the New York Times, joins us to talk about mobile gaming and tomorrow's launch of Angry Birds 2.

Egypt bans some "Made in China" souvenirs

Jul 30, 2015
Kim Adams

In any place highly dependent on tourism, there’s money to be made in selling souvenirs. But when the tourists stop coming, those businesses and manufacturers are out of luck.

That’s what happened in Egypt following the 2011 revolution. Now that some of those tourists are coming back, the government there is trying to prop up the handicraft manufacturers that remain.

Amazon's vision of a drone highway in the sky

Jul 29, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

What will Amazon’s drone highway in the sky look like? 

Probably not a drone highway. Amazon unveiled a proposal where low-level air space would be carved out for drones: 200 to 400 feet would be reserved for high-speed transit drones. Below, there would be space for low -speed local drone traffic, and above would be a no-fly buffer zone to keep drones out of manned-vehicle air space, aka flight paths.

Marketplace for Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Jul 29, 2015

Airing on Wednesday, July 29, 2015: Amazon plans a drone highway, a trade report from the tropics and Tom Cruise hangs off a plane.

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