Marketplace

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  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

A daily program about business and finance, it's a fresh way of reporting business & finance subjects to the general listener. Putting a human face on the global economy, the program illuminates the ways that international business and finance relate to listeners' daily lives.

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Molly Wood

Most people aren't paying for things with their phones just yet. If you are, maybe you're just getting used to using your fingerprint to authorize a transaction.

MasterCard is blazing right ahead with an app that will let you pay for items with your face.

Technically, you pay using your MasterCard, obviously. But to authorize your mobile payment, you look at your camera's selfie cam and blink once to prove you're a human.

The FCC is busy enforcing net neutrality

13 hours ago
Molly Wood

The Federal Communications Commission has now been in the business of enforcing net neutrality for a little less than a month and it's been busy. The FCC promptly fined AT&T $100 million for throttling some users unlimited data access. Sprint said it would stop doing the same thing now that the new rules are in effect. 

One formal net neutrality complaint has already been filed, and businesses and the government are trying to figure out what the Internet service game looks like now.

Molly Wood

It’s a holiday weekend, but there's still news to unpack before the Fourth of July barbecues can get started. Catherine Rampell from the Washington Post and Sudeep Reddy from the Wall Street Journal join Molly for this installment of the Weekly Wrap.

In the headlines:

The University of Washington lowers its tuition.

Marketplace for Friday, July 3, 2015

16 hours ago

On today's show wrap up: the week's business news, a look at Phil Knight's impact on Nike, and we contemplate a massive heath care merger. Plus: a conversation with FCC chair Tom Wheeler and the new Battle of the Alamo.

PODCAST: Theme park traffic

23 hours ago
David Brancaccio

On today's show, more on the shrinking stock market in Shanghai, which took a tumble today. Plus, we're headed into the thick of theme park season, and around the country-parks are adding new attractions, scarier rollar coasters, and wilder rides. We take a closer look at the role of a new ride in driving theme park traffic.

What's holding back wearable tech?

Jul 3, 2015
Nova Safo

Personal health and wellness technologies are projected to be a $5 billion business this year, according to the Consumer Electronics Association

Even President Barack Obama wears a wearable wellness device — a Fitbit — on occasion.

But, as it turns out, wearable technologies have a big obstacle to overcome: sensors — the miniaturized devices that measure things like speed and motion.

Airing on Friday, July 3, 2015: With Greeks heading to the polls on Sunday, the IMF is saying Greece needs $66 billion over the next and more flexibility from its lenders. More on that. Plus ... they’re back! And they’ve got their eyes on you. In an effort to reduce “shrinkage”, aka shoplifting, Wal-Mart brings greeters back to the front of the store. Seems that simple act of being seen and greeted as you walk into a store, may cut down on your urge to take a five-finger discount.

Philadelphia: the largest city to legalize Airbnb

Jul 3, 2015
Gigi Douban

Philadelphia has legalized Airbnb and agreed to tax rentals booked through the site. The city is preparing itself for two huge events — The 2016 Democratic National Convention a year from now. But first up, the pope’s visit.

According to Philadelphia’s tourism bureau, more than 1.5 million visitors are expected to descend on the city for the Papal event.

Marketplace for Thursday, July 2, 2015

Jul 2, 2015

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: One of Chicago's remaining black-owned banks is in danger of closing, a reality that's part of a national trend. Unlike the more segregated days when these banks were founded, African-American customers can now take their business elsewhere. But black-owned banks provide a link to a proud history, and research says, they may do something a lot more important. Marketplace's Dan Weissmann has the story. Next: forget the baking soda volcano.

U.S. Army recruits young innovators

Jul 2, 2015
Amy Scott

In a hotel in suburban Baltimore, kids file into a conference room wearing Army-issued white lab coats and safety goggles. The middle schoolers are among the finalists in the U.S. Army’s annual eCYBERMISSION STEM fair—20 teams selected from more than 7,000 around the country for their problem-solving projects.

Before the big competition, they break into small groups for some training.

What's your financial legacy?

Jul 2, 2015
Marketplace Weekend Staff

Next week, we're talking about legacies on the show. We want to hear your stories of financial legacies: what's your legacy? How will you be remebered? Maybe you have a legacy without an heir, maybe you're building something for your future....

We want to know. Tell us about the economic legacies in your life.

PODCAST: Rice in Cuba

Jul 2, 2015
David Brancaccio

It would appear people are dropping out of the American labor force in spite of new jobs created. More on that. Plus, as the U.S. announces plans to open a full embassy in Cuba, we look at the American rice industry, which is poised to benefit from more normalized relations, and ask how they’re preparing for changes ahead between the two countries. And with the Greek economy nearly immobilized by its debt, and Puerto Rico close to default, does the U.S. have lessons to learn from these situations? Marketplace's senior economics correspondent Chris Farrell weighs in.

Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, July 2, 2015: Major U.S. airlines are the subject of a federal investigation by the Department of Justice looking into whether they may be illegally coordinating to keep ticket prices up. More on that. Plus, we'll talk about New York City's ban on so-called “poor doors,” the separate entrances to mixed-income buildings that were to be used by lower-income residents. Plus, a conversation with Elizabeth Holmes, who at 31 is the youngest female, self-made multi-billionaire in America, according to Forbes.

Marketplace for Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Jul 1, 2015

Airing on Wednesday, July 1, 2015: Puerto Rico is in dire financial straits.  So what, you might shrug. Well, if any of your money is invested in a municipal bond fund, you might own Puerto Rican bonds, and they could take a hit. Marketplace's Adam Allington finds out who’s vulnerable. Next: Speaking today in Tennessee, President Obama will try to court conservative states to expand Medicaid under Obamacare. We unpack his sales pitch on using federal dollars to help states’ bottom lines.

Ford and Chrysler sales kicked into gear for June

Jul 1, 2015
Mark Garrison

Two of the Big Three American automakers — Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and Ford Motor Co. — are reporting nice gains in their June sales, according to numbers out Wednesday. A stronger job market and easy access to credit are spurring many Americans to trade up from the older cars in their garages.

But that’s not the only reason carmakers are happy these days. A booming housing market is also a factor: contractors are breaking ground on more homes, which means they’re buying more trucks.

Jeff Tyler

Just like the lottery, sports contracts can pay more when the profits are spread out over time. For example, let’s consider two of, arguably, the most bone-headed (or brilliant?) sports contracts of all time. The deal to fold the St. Louis Spirits has been called one of the best sports deals of all time. The contract has been so profitable that it’s used as a textbook example by business school professors. During basketball season, the deal inspires sports reporters to ask, “Would you believe a team that doesn’t exist still makes $17 million a year?”

PODCAST: The strong dollar

Jul 1, 2015
David Brancaccio

With emergency funding drying up, the Greek government sends a letter to creditors saying it might accept terms of a bailout. More on that. We'll also talk to Allan Sloan of the Washington Post about how the strong dollar is ironically helping U.S. businesses.

Airing on Wednesday, July 1, 2015: Greece's prime minister has reportedly sent a letter to the European Commission agreeing to most of Europe's conditions for a financial bailout. We'll talk to Elena Panaritis, chief economic adviser to the Greek Ministry of Finance, for more. Plus, starting Wednesday, career and vocational programs are facing tougher regulations that have been years in the making. The new so-called “gainful employment” rule is meant to crack down on programs that load students up with debt for courses that don’t lead to decent jobs.

Amy Scott

Starting Wednesday, career and vocational programs are facing tougher regulations that have been years in the making. The new so-called “gainful employment” rule is meant to crack down on programs that load students up with debt for courses that don’t lead to decent jobs. The rules especially target for-profit colleges, which often make close to 90 percent of their revenue from taxpayer dollars.

Puerto Rico's exodus: vicious cycles and silver linings

Jul 1, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

As Puerto Rico slides deeper into financial distress, flirting with default on July payments on its $72 billion debt, Puerto Ricans are leaving the island. They have been for a decade, in the largest outmigration since the '60s. 

“There’s so much uncertainty about what’s going to happen in Puerto Rico, it’s kind of crazy,” says Carlos Aponte, a 29-year-old native of San Juan who moved to New York last year so that his wife could pursue her medical residency.

The job opportunities here are a world away from on the island.   

The secret work life of bees

Jun 30, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Mukta Mohan

The USDA estimates that honey bees are worth $15 billion a year in agricultural value. The bee is responsible for as much as one in every three mouthfuls of food that we eat.

Marketplace for Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Jun 30, 2015

Airing on Tuesday, June 30, 2015: Puerto Rico is in dire financial straits, with its governor saying it cannot pay its $72 billion in debt. He wants to defer payments and negotiate with creditors. We look at what Puerto Rico's options. Next: President Obama announced Tuesday that he will update labor rules to allow workers extra pay for work beyond 40 hours.

The Greek debt crisis by the numbers

Jun 30, 2015
Marketplace staff

The need-to-know numbers about the Greek debt crisis, explained by Paddy Hirsch.

Produced by Preditorial | www.preditorial.tv

Writer and Host: Paddy Hirsch

Director and Edtor: Rick Kent

Director of Photography: Anton Seim

Producer: Mimi Kent

PODCAST: Greek credit cards

Jun 30, 2015
David Brancaccio

Greece and the faulty assumption that everyone has access to a credit card. We'll check in on how Greek citizens are handling the banks being shutdown there. Plus, the Export-Import Bank’s charter expires at midnight Wednesday: we look at how this leaves it in an awkward state of limbo. And Apple's new music streaming service launches today. We'll talk about what to expect.

Airing on Tuesday, June 30, 2015: Banks are rationing cash, European creditors are closing in — Sounds like the current situation in Greece. But that was Cyprus, two years ago. What was learned and will Greece heed any of those lessons? Plus, President Barack Obama is moving to make millions more Americans eligible for overtime pay. More on that. And in Nairobi, Kenya, an upscale mall attacked by terrorists is preparing to reopen. Kenyan officials plan to reopen part of the mall on Wednesday, but as we find out, not everyone is happy about it. 

Conversations about mobility, live from Aspen

Jun 29, 2015
Marketplace staff

Monday's Marketplace was broadcast live from the Belly Up in Aspen, Colorado, and the Aspen Ideas Festival. We took a break from the usual Marketplace format for a series of conversations all around one theme: mobility and the economy.

Economic mobility (or lack thereof) in Greece (starts at 01:10)

First things first: we had to talk about Greece. The European Central Bank froze funding to Greek banks. As the latest deadline for the country looms over its creditors and citizens, tensions are understandably high.

SCOTUS rules against EPA regulations

Jun 29, 2015
Alberta Cross, Adrienne Hill and Scott Tong

The Supreme Court handed President Barack Obama two victories last week: the Affordable Care Act will keep its subsidies and same-sex marriage became legal in all 50 states. But in a 5-4 decision on Monday, the Supreme Court decided against the Environmental Prote

Marketplace for Monday, June 29, 2015

Jun 29, 2015

Airing on Monday, June 29, 2015: Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal is bringing the news to you from the Aspen Ideas Festival. First: Kai talks to David Leonhardt of the New York Times about the breaking news of the day and what it has to do with mobility. Plus: mountaineer Chris Davenport and Ted Sarandos, Netflix chief content officer, talk to Kai about the mobility of content and competition.

Europeans take refuge in gold

Jun 29, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Let's circle back to the lack of mobility Greeks and their money are dealing with right now.

Bloomberg News is reporting that Europeans have been buying gold — traditionally the safest of safe havens — at quite a clip this month.

The U.K. Royal Mint says sales of gold coins to Greeks was "double the five-month average in June." 

Puerto Rico faces debt deadline

Jun 29, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

Puerto Rico is staring down a deadline on July 1st when some of its $72.3 billion in public debt will come due. There’s the $630 million payment on general obligation bonds, and the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority owes money on its $9 billion debt.  

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