Morning Edition

Weekday mornings 4am-9am
Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

The posts below are some of the highlights from Morning EditionVisit the program page on NPR to see a full list of stories.

  

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Business
3:00 am
Fri October 14, 2011

Ala. Needs Workers, Law Chases Away Immigrants

Alabama business owners are furious about the state's new immigration law. They say it is costing them business. Some wonder if the state will ultimately change the law, which is leading legal and illegal immigrants to flee the state.

U.S.
1:04 pm
Thu October 13, 2011

Hedge Fund Manager Rajaratnam Sentenced To 11 Years

Raj Rajaratnam was once one of the wealthiest hedge fund managers in the world. Now, the former billionaire and Galleon Group co-founder faces 11 years in prison for his role in an insider trading case. A judge in Manhattan handed out the sentence Thursday morning.

Europe
6:24 am
Thu October 13, 2011

Runner Confesses To Bus Ride During Race

Rob Sloan finished third in a marathon outside New Castle, England. Spectators saw him running through bushes and jumping on a public bus.

Around the Nation
6:14 am
Thu October 13, 2011

Fla. Gov. Rick Scott Slams Anthropology Degrees

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

World
5:28 am
Thu October 13, 2011

Wall Street Protests Make News Around The World

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 1:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's some other news we are following. The Occupy Wall Street protests have made news around the world including the state-run media in Syria. Syria, facing its own protests, is highlighting American dissatisfaction and now the U.S. Embassy in Syria has responded on its Facebook page.

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Business
3:00 am
Thu October 13, 2011

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 1:04 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

These improvements in smartphones bring us to our last word in business: enhance it. It's a scene from countless movies and TV shows, computer experts race to analyze a blurry photograph to find a clue to catch the bad guy.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Enhance it.

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Middle East
3:00 am
Thu October 13, 2011

Foiled Iranian Death Plot Reads Like A Spy Novel

U.S. authorities have charged two Iranians in a plot to kill a Saudi envoy. Steve Inskeep talks to David Ignatius, a best-selling novelist and foreign policy columnist for "The Washington Post," and to Karim Sadjadpour, an expert on Iran and the Middle East with the Carnegie Endowment, about the plot which sounds like it came out of a spy novel.

Africa
3:00 am
Thu October 13, 2011

Libyan Civilians Trapped In The Battle For Sirte

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 1:04 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Rebel fighters now control most of Moammar Gadhafi's hometown. They blasted their way into Sirte during one of the bloodiest battles of Libyan civil war with civilians caught in the middle and accusations of brutality on both sides. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro was in Sirte yesterday. And we advise you that some people will find the details of her four-minute report disturbing.

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Africa
3:00 am
Thu October 13, 2011

Libyan Guns Pour Into Egypt, Sinai Residents Arm Themselves

Ali Madaan, 45, is one of the Bedouin guards protecting the al-Midan station in Egypt's northern Sinai. The natural gas pipeline there has come under repeated attacks.

Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 1:04 pm

The Sinai Peninsula has proven a major security headache for Egypt's military rulers since a popular uprising ousted President Hosni Mubarak eight months ago.

Gunmen who crossed over the border into Israel from southern Sinai killed eight civilians in August. In northern Sinai, unknown assailants have repeatedly attacked a natural gas pipeline feeding Israel and Jordan.

But what ultimately may prove more problematic for Egyptian authorities is the growing number of northern Sinai residents who are arming themselves with heavy weapons coming in from Libya.

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Politics
3:00 am
Thu October 13, 2011

Romney Camp Slow To Attract Former Bush Donors

Republican donor Ray Washburne was a major contributor to George W. Bush's presidential campaign, and he was the national finance chairman for Tim Pawlenty. But when Pawlenty pulled out of the presidential race, Washburne tells Steve Inskeep that it took some time before deciding to back Mitt Romney's campaign.

Business
3:00 am
Thu October 13, 2011

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

Books News & Features
11:01 pm
Wed October 12, 2011

'Catch-22': A Paradox Turns 50 And Still Rings True

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 3:53 pm

Fifty years ago, a new phrase began to make its way into American conversations: "Catch-22." Joseph Heller's irreverent World War II novel — named for the now-famous paradox — was published on Oct. 11, 1961. His take on war meshed perfectly with the anti-authoritarian generation that came of age in the 1960s. And now, a half-century later, the predicament of a no-win trap still resonates with a new crop of young people distrustful of their elders.

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Around the Nation
5:59 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Corn Maze Baffles Family Of Four

Bob Connors tells the Boston Globe he designed the seven-acre maze in Danvers, Mass., so people would get lost. Apparently it worked because a family of four became completely disoriented. In a final act of desperation, they called 911 from inside the maze.

History
5:56 am
Wed October 12, 2011

World's Oldest Running Car Sells For $4.5 Million

In 1887, the French-made motor car La Marquise was in the first automobile race. It is still running. The car got a standing ovation when it was driven onstage at a recent auction, and a winning bid of more than $4.5 million.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed October 12, 2011

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 7:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's remember, now, a pioneer for gay rights. Yesterday, on National Coming Out Day, Frank Kameny died.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Mr. Kameny fought in World War II. He earned a PhD from Harvard. He landed a job with the U.S. Army Map Service. And then, in 1957, he was fired for being gay. Frank Kameny sued, and lost, and appealed, and lost. But this was still a landmark case. It was the first federal civil rights claim based on sexual orientation. He also organized a group called the Homophiles.

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NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Fact Checking: Latest GOP Debate

Steve Inskeep and Bill Adair, editor of the non-partisan fact-checking web site Politifact.com, truth squad the latest Republican presidential debate held last night in Hanover, New Hampshire.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Does Dexia's Collapse Herald A Wider Banking Crisis?

Until now, the eurozone debt crisis has been confined to countries on the continent's periphery — like Greece, Spain and Ireland. But that may be changing with the collapse of a bank at the core of the eurozone. While some call Franco-Belgian lender Dexia's demise an exception, others say it is a wake-up call for all European banks.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed October 12, 2011

U.S.: Iran Behind Plot To Kill Saudi Envoy

Steve Inskeep talks with Iran expert Ray Takeyh of the Council on Foreign Relations about the criminal charges filed yesterday against two Iranians — one a naturalized U.S. citizen — accused of plotting to kill the Saudi Ambassador to Washington.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Economic Progress Lags For U.S. Born Children Of Mexican Immigrants

Since the last decade, there are now more Hispanic children of immigrants in the United States than actual immigrants. That should translate into more progress — educationally and economically. But Steve Trejo, an economist at the University of Texas at Austin, tells Renee Montagne that while the second generation does better than the first, the third generation doesn't fare as well.

Middle East
3:00 am
Wed October 12, 2011

Hamas, Israel Reach Deal To Swap Prisoners

The Israeli government and the Palestinian militant group Hamas have agreed to a prisoner exchange. Hamas says Israel will free more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners in exchange for Gilad Schalit, the Israeli soldier captured by Hamas militants and held in Gaza for more than five years.

Music Interviews
4:20 pm
Tue October 11, 2011

Harry Belafonte: Out Of Struggle, A Beautiful Voice

Harry Belafonte's new memoir is titled My Song. An HBO documentary about the singer-songwriter and activist, Sing My Song, is scheduled to air Oct. 17.

AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 11, 2011 11:01 pm

To read Harry Belafonte's new memoir, My Song, is to discover a man who has packed enough life for 10 people into 84 years. There's the smash hit from 1956, "Banana Boat Song." There's a film career that made great use of his matinee-idol looks. And then there's Harry Belafonte the activist.

In the 1960s, he was a confidant of Martin Luther King Jr.'s. By the '80s, he was helping organize "We Are the World," the anthem for famine relief in Africa.

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Race
8:29 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Latinos On TV: Laughing At Culture, Laughing With It

Originally published on Fri January 6, 2012 6:05 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: With us to listen in on how Spanish has been used on television is NPR's Felix Contreras, producer for NPR's Arts Desk.

And, Felix, when did U.S. audiences start to hear Spanish on the airwaves?

FELIX CONTRERAS: You know, pretty much since the earliest days of the medium. And the most prominent example of this is the show that set viewing records in the 1950s and also featured a character with a thick accent who struggled with English.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "I LOVE LUCY")

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Around the Nation
6:54 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Least Active City Mocks 'Men's Health' Ranking

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Around the Nation
6:50 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Decoys Help Utah Nab Violators Who Hunt At Night

Originally published on Fri January 6, 2012 6:05 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Television
5:55 am
Tue October 11, 2011

On TV, The Black Best Friend Concept Is Growing

On Network TV, there are 27 new shows and nearly all of the main leads are white actors. There is one role on television where minority characters may be on the rise: Black Best Friend. TV critic Eric Deggans says these characters need to be upgraded to well-rounded co-star.

Animals
5:50 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Inside Namibia's Communal Conservancies

The southwest African country of Namibia is trying a controversial approach to preserving its wildlife. Rural people control the animals and profit from them. But they have also found they must shoot some of the animals to cull the herds.

Afghanistan
5:40 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Report: Afghan-Detention Centers Tortured Suspects

The 74-page report by the United Nationss concludes that suspected Taliban fighters have been subjected to beatings, electric shocks and other forms of torture in some Afghan-run detention centers.

National Security
5:09 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Underwear Bomber Trial To Begin In Detroit

Originally published on Fri January 6, 2012 6:05 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Today, opening statements are scheduled for a man who became instantly famous in the Christmas season in 2009. Omar Farouk Abdulmutallub is a young Nigerian. He's accused of attempting to bring down an airliner bound for Detroit with explosives in his underwear.

Read more
NPR Story
3:00 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Business News

Shareholder Services, a major investor advisory firm, is urging shareholders to oust Rupert Murdoch and his sons from the board at News Corp. The firm recommended against re-electing 13 of the 15 News Corp. board members when shareholders hold their annual meeting in two weeks.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Seattle-Based Venture Opens Facility In Shanghai

Two Seattle-based companies plan to open the first American-operated senior facility in China. Chinese families used to rely on children and grandchildren to care for aging parents, but people are working long hours, and options for senior care are limited.

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