Under the Microscope

Thursdays at 5:20pm, Fridays at 8:21am

KBIA's weekly look at science, technology, and health in Missouri and beyond. Find us on iTunes

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Melanie Cheney / Flickr

On February 2, the non-profit organization Missouri River Relief will host the Wild and Scenic film festival at the Blue Note in Columbia. Festival-goers can expect to see a variety of environmental and adventure films. One of those films, Big Muddy Clean Sweep, documents the organization’s trek across the state, cleaning the Missouri River aboard a barge.

Steve Schnarr is the program manager for Missouri River relief. We spoke to him about what it was like traveling across the state, his own connection to the Missouri River and what people could expect at the festival.

On food and phones

Feb 2, 2012
Kris Krüg / Flickr

 

On the show this week, we’ll revisit a report that tests the iPhone 4s’s ability to recognize accents, and hear from author Michael Pollan.

woodleywonderworks / Flickr

This week on the show, we explore gender differences in math achievement and performance.

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

 

This week on the show: do you know what's living in your firewood? Plus, new cultivars could change Missouri's wine industry.

Rehman Tungekar / KBIA

This week on the show: a former engineer calls for an investigation of the Callaway nuclear plant. Plus, new research may provide insight into how a species of treefrog evolved.

Grant Gerlock/NET News

This week on the episode: fast food chains may soon be forced to disclose health information on their menus. Plus, a surging student population places pressure on the mental health counselors at the University of Missouri.

Tracking the doctors, and the dollars

Dec 22, 2011
nomadsoul1 / dreamstime

This week in Under the Microscope, a special report: KBIA's JESSICA PUPOVAC goes looking for the doctors and the dollars – for information on local doctors who receive payments from pharmaceutical companies in exchange for promoting their products. 

ozark riverways sign
Jimmy Wayne / Flickr

This week on the show: why aren't the candidates for President talking about agricultural issues? Plus: environmental groups petition the National Park Service to take better care of Missouri rivers.

Remaking school lunches

Dec 8, 2011
Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

This week on the show: your child's school lunches aren't likely to get much healthier anytime soon. Plus: why you should still get the flu vaccine.

Sylvia Maria Gross / Harvest Public Media

Rural America is losing its grocery stores. Many parts of the United States, and large swaths of rural Missouri, are now classified as ‘food deserts’, areas where residents lack access to affordable food.

But as Harvest Public Media's Sylvia Maria Gross reports, some small towns are finding creative ways deal with the problem.

Plus: Nancy Sutley is President Obama’s principal environmental advisor and the Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality.

An accent ‘test-drive’ of the iPhone’s new digital assistant. Plus: at what age do babies start engaging in mind-reading? One MU researcher thinks she’s got it figured out.

pills
Pink Sherbert Photography / Flickr

This week on the show: the University of Missouri sponsors the Suicide Prevention Week. Plus: Missouri is ill-equipped to deal with prescription drug abuse.

Eric Durban / Harvest Pubic Media

This week on the show: a popular conservation program may fall victim to the 2012 Farm Bill. Plus, robot tractors.

Camille Phillips / KBIA

This week on the show: do you know what's living in your firewood? Plus, new cultivars could change Missouri's wine industry.

At the fourth in a series of public input sessions Thursday night in Jefferson City, farmers and representatives of lawmakers shared opinions and criticism on how the corps handled the historic flooding last May, June and July.

Billy Idle / Flickr

This week on the show: kids are spending more time in front of digital screens. Plus, the aurora borealis shows itself in the Missouri sky.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

Chronic medical conditions are a huge problem for the homeless, unemployed, or uninsured. In an effort to address this problem, a group of University of Missouri medical students founded MedZou, a student staffed and managed medical clinic that provides free medical care to the uninsured. Though the clinic is a little ad-hoc – it sees patients in a donated meeting area a few nights a month – it provides the students with valuable practice and the patients with potentially life-changing care. KBIA’s Jessica Pupovac has this story.

Jill Utrup / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

This week on the show, we hear about salamanders, energy-saving techniques, and the strange, secret world of mushroom hunters.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

This week, we look at a bill that could take some of the uncertainty out of end-of-life decisions. Plus, will funding woes doom agricultural research?

Hosted by Kyle Deas

This week, we look at a video-game accessory that could prevent injuries among the elderly. Plus, Columbia College is getting a new science building.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

Flickr

This week, we sit down with Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to discuss the American jobs act. Plus, advancements in ice-cream technology.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

Flickr

This week, a food pantry that’s trying to offer healthier food to low-income families. Plus, an MU researcher tells us how quitting smoking may make you a happier person.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

This week, we hear from a Washington University virologist whose made it his mission to combat bio-terrorism. Plus: robots!

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

This week, we take a look at the tricky link between farm policy and obesity. Plus, the State Veterinarian talks about what his office does – and why it’s important.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

Lauren Hasler

Thousand Cankers Disease could create a $850 million problem for the state of Missouri. MU’s John Faaborg uses tail feathers to track migrating birds on “Call of the Wild.”

Hosted By Rebecca Wolfson (Columbia, MO)

Rebecca Wolfson / KBIA

White Squirrels thrive in Marionville, Missouri, in spite of their genetic deficiencies on “Call of the Wild.”  New research at MU’s PRIME Lab reveals findings about stereotypes.

Rebecca Wolfson

Edamame, ed-a-mommy, eda who? Listen to a feature from Harvest Public Media on edamame production in the Midwest. Also, a first-person narrative about a failed attempt to see Missouri’s greatest birding spectacle.

Hosted By Rebecca Wolfson (Columbia, MO)

 

“Call of the Wild” kicks off the first part of a bear series. Follow KBIA’s Margaret Berglund as she traps bears, explains the Science behind new bear research and explores the controversy surrounding bear-hunting. Lead author of MU’s Bisphenol A study talks about the health implications of this toxic chemical found in plastics.

Hosted by Rebecca Wolfson

This week’s “Call of the Wild” features the bee, and a movement to revive native pollinator populations. A new hunger atlas tracks food insecurity in Missouri.

Rebecca Wolfson

 

MU Psychology professor Kennon Sheldon is the happiness guru, and talks about the keys to happiness. Also, “Call of the Wild,” a weekly segment featuring Missouri animals, debuts with a dove hunting trip.

Hosted by Rebecca Wolfson

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