2016 election

At the time it seemed certain to fail.

When two Washington Post reporters left the legendary paper to launch a start-up political website and free newspaper with publisher Robert Allbritton in 2007, many in the nation's capital were dismissive.

Nearly a decade later, the tables are turned and the news site Politico is firmly entrenched not just in Washington but as a national news outlet. 

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri voters passed Amendment 6 Tuesday to become the eighth state to require a photo ID to vote. 

Amendment 6, which requires voters to show a state, federal or military issued ID to cast a ballot, passed with 63 percent of the vote.

Sarah Kellogg

Residents all over the state of Missouri cast their ballot for the next president on Tuesday. In what’s been called one of the most polarizing elections in history, Residents at watch parties in Columbia and Jefferson City talked to KBIA reporters about their reactions to Donald Trump winning the presidency.

Who Didn't Watch The Election Last Night?

Nov 9, 2016

We've spent most of the morning hearing from people who followed last night's election returns intently. But how about the people who actively avoided them? KBIA sent reporters Carter Woodiel, Hannah Haynes and Bram Sable-Smith out to find them.

Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

Democrat Judy Baker lost the race for Missouri State Treasurer to Republican Eric Schmidt.

Baker is not new to running for political office having served in the Missouri House of Representatives from 2004 to 2008. During this time Baker served on the Healthy Missouri Caucus. She then served as the Health and Human Services regional director of Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska from 2009 to 2011.

Baker had hoped to combine this experience with her experience as a former economics professor to address the causes poverty in Missouri.

Marjie Kennedy / Flickr

  Missouri voters will be the first in the nation to decide whether to amend their state constitution to prohibit sales taxes from being expanded to services.

The proposal on the Nov. 8 ballot is a backlash against efforts in various states to extend sales taxes from consumer goods to services such as auto repairs, haircuts, legal work or financial accounting.

If the Missouri measure passes, supporters hope that it could become a national model.