Flickr / steakpinball

The outcome of a Texas abortion dispute could have an impact on Missouri.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Without his signature, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has allowed legislation that will require doctors to be in the room for the initial dose of a drug used in medication abortions.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is considering legislation that would require doctors to be in the room for the initial dose of a drug used in medication abortions.

The Republican-led Legislature approved the measure this year. Supporters say the requirement would prohibit abortions using telemedicine and protect a woman's health and safety by ensuring the prescribing physician is present. Critics, however, say the process is safe and that the legislation is a further effort to restrict access to abortion services in Missouri.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

New legislation pending before Gov. Jay Nixon could give people running short of money a new alternative for getting some quick cash.

A bill would make it profitable for Missouri-based banks to offer short-term cash advances, similar to payday loans.

Some nationally chartered banks already offer the short-term loans with fees of around $50 on a $500 loan. Missouri law had allowed such loans, but the Missouri Bankers Association says that few banks offered them because the law set the maximum fee too low.

The Missouri House has endorsed legislation requiring the prescribing doctor to be present when a woman takes any drug to induce an abortion.

The bill received first-round approval 119-41 on Wednesday. It needs another vote to move to the Senate.
Sponsoring House member Jeannie Riddle, a Republican from Mokane, says the legislation is intended to protect women's health and safety. Opponents said the goal appears to be more restriction of abortion.\

Photo courtesy Lana Wilson and Martha Shane.

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

Andrew Yost / KBIA

A newly published report says Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin was repeatedly arrested during anti-abortion protests in 1985.

Akin recently acknowledged being arrested once, about 25 years ago, but has declined to discuss additional details.

Todd Akin
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin has said he was arrested as an abortion protester about 25 years ago, but he's not saying anything more about it.

Akin campaign adviser Rick Tyler said Wednesday that Akin never was charged and the campaign will not release any further details about the incident.

At a news conference last Friday in Kansas City, Akin acknowledged the arrest but did not go into specifics. An aide had said the campaign would release more details later.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Republican Senate candidate Todd Akin is again drawing attention for comments about abortion — this time, for saying that doctors are "giving abortions to women who are not actually pregnant."

j.stephenconn / flickr

The Missouri House has passed legislation that would bar local governments from interfering with the day-to-day operations of alternatives to abortion agencies.

Newscast for May 9, 2012

May 9, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA News room, including:

  • University of Missouri-Kansas City considers a name change
  • Dred Scott honored at Missouri Capitol ceremony
  • Mo. House backs pregnancy center advertising bill

The Missouri House has endorsed legislation barring local governments from regulating the speech and advertising of centers that counsel women on alternatives to abortion.