aca repeal

For the hundreds of rural hospitals struggling to stay in business, health policy decisions made in Washington D.C. this summer could make survival a lot tougher.

The Affordable Care Act did a lot to expand HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention for people at highest risk for the disease. Many gay men and other men who have sex with men gained health insurance and new infections went down. The estimated number of annual HIV infections in the United States declined 18 percent among gay and bisexual men between 2008 and 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Two-year-old Ryan Lennon Fines is sitting on his family’s couch flipping through a picture book of emergency vehicles. He’s looking for the motorcycle, but first he stops on the page with an airplane.

“That’s an air ambulance,” his father Scott Fines tells him, “you’ve been on one of those.”

When Ryan was born on Christmas day 2014, his mouth wasn’t connected to his stomach. It’s a condition known as esophageal atresia. After three months in a NICU in St. Louis the family flew to Boston, where Ryan had surgery.

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 Under the Affordable Care Act, Americans without insurance must pay a penalty when they file their federal tax returns. But recent efforts to repeal the ACA have caused some confusion. KBIA’s Michaela Tucker spoke with University of Missouri Extension Professor Andrew Zumwalt to clarify, before this year’s tax season is over.

 

 

When filing taxes, Americans can fall into three categories for the ACA tax penalty. If you have health insurance, there is no penalty. If you don't have insurance, you pay the penalty. The third category is you have a penalty, but are exempt from the payment. Zumwalt said exemptions include having income below the poverty level, being incarcerated, living outside the country and having unaffordable coverage.

Six years ago, 53-year-old Corla Morgan noticed blisters forming on her neck and back.

“I couldn’t sleep because when I took my shirt off, if my shirt touched my skin, the skin just peeled off,” Morgan says. “I was in really horrible pain.”

Darvin Bentlage says his health insurance plan used to be the same as all the other cattle farmers in Barton County, Mo.: stay healthy until he turned 65, then get on Medicare. But when he turned 50, things did not go according to plan.

“Well, I had a couple issues,” he says.

He’s putting it mildly.


In a letter sent to Congress Wednesday, the American Medical Association said it could not support the American Health Care Act "as drafted." The bill was released Monday evening as congressional Republicans' replacement for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. 

Ahead of the association's decision, KBIA sat down to talk healthcare reform with Dr. David Barbe, president-elect of the American Medical Association and a practicing physician in rural Mountain Grove, Mo. 


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Health care policy has come back into public discussion in a big way, and we want to add your voice to the conversation. Over the coming months, we’ll be featuring interviews with health care providers, experts and everyday Missourians about their health hopes, needs and concerns moving forward.


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A lunchtime rally brought about 50 people to U.S. Senator Roy Blunt’s Columbia, Missouri office Friday, voicing their support for the Affordable Care Act to his local staff. The demonstrators called for the health care law to be fixed rather than repealed completely.