aclu

PM Newscast September 24, 2014

Sep 24, 2014

  • Five arrested in Ferguson protests
  • Interstate 70 briefly shut down
  • Ashland YMCA looking to expand
  • ACLU challenges Missouri marriage amendment in KC
  • Columbia Public Schools increase security
  • SEMO student enrollment reaches all-time high
missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Last week, it was hard to miss the huge news coming out of Columbia.

Former University of Missouri defensive lineman Michael Sam came out to ESPN last week. He could be the first openly gay NFL player after the draft in May.

"I'm not afraid to tell the world who I am. I'm Michael Sam: I'm a college graduate. I'm African American, and I'm gay," Sam said. "I'm comfortable in my skin."

ACLU seeks same-sex marriage recognition in Missouri

Feb 13, 2014
rainbow flag
Ludovic Bertron / Wikimedia Commons

The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri has filed a lawsuit to defend same-sex marriage rights in the State. Eight same-sex couples who were married outside of Missouri are claiming the same privileges as opposite-sex couples in a lawsuit against the state.  

rainbow flag
Ludovic Bertron / Wikimedia Commons

 

  The American Civil Liberties Union on Wednesday plans to file suit challenging Missouri's treatment of same-sex marriages.

ACLU's Diane Balogh said Tuesday that the suit will be filed in state court in Kansas City, but she would not discuss specifics. News conferences announcing the litigation are planned for Wednesday morning in Kansas City, St. Louis, Jefferson City and Springfield.

It's unclear if the ACLU suit will challenge Missouri's constitutional ban on same-sex marriages or if it would simply seek recognition of gay marriages from other states.

prison cell
mikecogh / Flickr

A central Missouri county has been told by a federal judge that it must issue a license to inmates without requiring the person to fill out the marriage license application in the presence of the county recorder of deeds or their deputy.

A month ago, St. Louis Public Radio reported on the questionable manner in which the state of Missouri got ahold of its potential execution drug. Now Missouri has a new plan to go ahead with two upcoming executions, but the process is anything but open.

Updated 11/14/13 3:24 p.m.

gavel
joegratz / flickr

Missouri death row inmate Joseph Franklin has an unexpected advocate for the stoppage of his planned execution.

Hustler publisher Larry Flynt and the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri Foundation filed a motion in federal court to have documentation concerning Franklin’s planned execution unsealed.

Flynt was paralyzed from the waist down in 1978 after being shot by Franklin in Georgia in retaliation for Hustler containing an interracial photo spread. Franklin is facing execution for committing multiple murders.

pills
acephotos1 / dreamstime

A federal judge has ruled that a mid-Missouri technical college's mandatory drug testing policy is unconstitutional when applied to most students.

U.S. District Judge Nanette K. Laughrey in Jefferson City on Friday sided with the American Civil Liberties Union, which sued Linn State Technical College on behalf of six students.

Linn State attorney Kent Brown had not yet read the ruling, but said any ruling against the school would be appealed.

Noahudlis / Wikimedia Commons

The American Civil Liberties Union hopes to block two executions in Missouri this fall by seeking to disqualify the anesthesiologist used by the Department of Corrections.

Jeffrey Mittman is Executive Director of the ACLU of Eastern Missouri.  He says the American Board of Anesthesiology has recently adopted the same standards used by the American Medical Association, meaning that they cannot participate in ending someone's life.

Trevor Harris / KBIA

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit against Morgan County. The suit alleges that Morgan County officials are violating people's constitutional rights by confiscating mail sent to jail detainees.

The Jefferson City News-Tribune reports that the St. Louis-based ACLU of Eastern Missouri filed the federal lawsuit last week and asked a judge to certify the case as a class action. The ACLU also is seeking a preliminary injunction.

American flag
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is asking a federal appeals court to reinstate Missouri's law prohibiting desecration of the American flag, a law struck down by a federal judge last year.

401(K)2012 / FLICKR

The Americans Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit against the state prison facility at Jefferson City over a policy they say is barring inmates from getting married.

Open Heart Baptist Church
KBIA

A federal judge will hear arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit over Missouri's new law making it a crime to disturb a worship service.

Attorneys for the American Civil Liberties Union are seeking a temporary injunction to block the law that took effect last month.

The law makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally disturb or interrupt a "house of worship" with profane language, rude or indecent behavior or noise that breaks the solemnity of the service. Violators could face up to six months in jail and a $500 fine. Repeat offenders could get up to five years in prison.

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a class action lawsuit late this afternoon that takes issue with part of Amendment Two, which deals with prayer and religious expression in Missouri.  

Amendment Two specifically protects public prayer and lets students avoid assignments that violate their religious beliefs.

Tony Rothert, legal director for the ACLU’s eastern Missouri division, said the lawsuit is focused on this specific phrase:

This section shall not be construed to expand the rights of prisoners in state or local custody beyond those afforded by the laws of the United States.

Camdenton’s R-III school district is paying $125,000 in legal fees and costs as part of a settlement with the American Civil Liberties Union over blocking Internet access to websites with information about gay, lesbian and transgender issues, the Associated Press reports.

 A lawsuit seeking to block a proposed constitutional amendment regarding voter identification in Missouri was heard today in Jefferson City.

St. Louis Landmark Association website

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed suit against the city of St. Louis, asking a judge to make the city turn over jail records related to inmate grievances.

Newscast for January 26, 2012

Jan 26, 2012

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • $27 million in grant money to health insurance exchange in Missouri has come to a complete halt
  • Missouri democrats block weak workplace discrimination bill in State Senate
  • ACLU sues St. Louis for inmate grievances
  • Big trucks on small roads--cattlemen vs. MoDOT