africa

James Cridland/Creative Commons via Flickr

Overpopulation has been debated since British economist Thomas Malthus famously warned in 1798 that humans could reproduce far faster than they could increase their food supply.

But since Malthus's time, world population has grown from 800 million to 7.5 billion today. Yet worries about overpopulation are back. In part that's because lots more people are on the way, complicating efforts to deal with problems like climate change and water scarcity.

The UN forecasts that in the near future the world will add about 83 million people annually. By 2100, world population will grow to 11.2 billion.

On this edition of Global Journalist: a look at the growth of human population and the debate about its risks.


Crystal Davis/World Resources Institute / Flickr

Overpopulation has been debated since British economist Thomas Malthus famously warned in 1798 that humans could reproduce far faster than they could increase their food supply.

But since Malthus's time, world population has grown from 800 million to 7.5 billion today. Yet worries about overpopulation are back. In part that's because lots more people are on the way, complicating efforts to deal with problems like climate change and water scarcity.

The UN forecasts that in the near future the world will add about 83 million people annually. By 2100, world population will grow to 11.2 billion.

On this edition of Global Journalist: a look at the growth of human population and the debate about its risks.


Ebola epidemic continues

Nov 6, 2014
Michael Duff / AP

Since our last program on Ebola, the death toll from the disease has more than doubled to 4,800. U.S. and Spanish aid workers sickened by Ebola also transmitted it to medical workers in the U.S. and in Spain - causing widespread media coverage - and leading people to talk of an epidemic of “Fear-Bola.” But there is good news. The West African nation of Liberia has been hardest hit by the disease, with an estimated 6,500 cases. But last week the country reported just 89 new probable cases.

Ebola in West Africa

Sep 18, 2014
ebola treatment
Kjell Gunnar Beraas, MSF / AP Photo

There has been a lot of media coverage lately dedicated to the spread of the Ebola virus in Africa, which is estimated to have killed at least 2,300 people. The outbreak began in December 2013, when the first cases of Ebola virus were reported in Guinea, located in western Africa. Since then, the disease has spread to neighboring Senegal and Sierra Leone, and from there to Liberia. Both the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization, warn that unless immediate action is taken quickly, the outbreak could become unmanageable.

Greg Baker / AP Photo

Kenyans that want to hear the latest international news can listen to the BBC, the Voice of America, or Al-Jazeera. Africans can also tune in China Radio International, which is gaining ground in the crowded market.