agricultue

Kristofor Husted/KBIA

Today, we’re bringing you United and Divided, a series of stories on bridging the urban-rural divide. It's reported by Harvest Public Media.

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election one thing is clear: rural America and urban America see things differently. In this series of profiles, Harvest Public Media reporters introduce us to our fellow Americans and examine the issues that they hold dear. We re-discover the ties that bind us and learn more about the lines that divide us. And through these voices, we come to know Americans just a little bit better.

Reporters from Missouri, Colorado, Iowa and Nebraska explore topics causing rift in the country, and how those differences define the future. They looked at schools, religion, immigration and trade policy. 


Pig
File Photo / KBIA

Cases of Seneca Valley Virus have risen in Missouri and the rest of the country over the past year. Infected pigs develop blisters on the nose and where the hoof meets the leg, but the real concern is that these blisters look almost identical to those caused by Foot-and-Mouth Disease, which would pose a threat to pigs and pork exports in the United States. While Seneca Valley Virus is not dangerous, its similar appearance to Foot and-Mouth Disease is causing concern that the more serious disease could be overlooked.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Grabbing a quick meal doesn’t just mean fast food anymore. Now there are “fast-casual” options like Chipotle or Panera, restaurants that borrow ideas from both fast food and upscale sit-down restaurants.

Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

After the patent on one of the most popular versions of genetically engineered soybeans expired this year, U.S. universities are creating new generic GMO soybean varieties, many of which are designed to guard against specific, local pests.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

    

Close to 60,000 jobs are set to open up in agriculture, food and natural resource sectors each year for the next five years, according to a report from Purdue University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The American agriculture industry has a problem though; there are not enough grads to fill them. The report projects about two open jobs for every qualified graduate. That’s left the USDA, land grant universities and private industry scrambling to try and bridge the gap.

dok1 / Flickr

To support a growing population, farmers worldwide need to emphasize the sustainable growth of three major foods: corn, wheat and rice, according to the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization