ameren labadie

The Sierra Club says Ameren's Labadie power plant in Franklin County does not meet state and federal water quality standards and wants it brought into compliance.

On Friday, the environmental group filed an appeal with the state, alleging the plant’s operating permit does not do enough to protect wildlife or groundwater.

machinecodeblue via Flickr

A series of documentary screenings across Missouri called the Coal Ash Stories Tour began in Columbia at the University of Missouri’s Strickland Hall Thursday night. The four documentary short films shown at the event have the goal of raising awareness of coal ash negatively affecting the waters and environment of the United States. 

Veronique LaCapra / St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the first-ever rules to cut carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants.

Updated Thursday 10:15 p.m.

The Sierra Club says Ameren has been routinely violating air quality standards at its St. Louis-area power plants.

In a Notice of Intent to Sue delivered to Ameren on Wednesday afternoon, the Sierra Club alleges the company's Labadie, Meramec, and Rush Island plants have exceeded air pollution limits almost 10,000 times since 2008.

Environmental groups are once again urging state officials to require groundwater monitoring at Ameren’s coal-fired power plants in eastern Missouri.

The Sierra Club and Labadie Environmental Organization submitted a letter to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources on Thursday asking the state not to allow Ameren to build new coal ash landfills before testing groundwater for contamination.


Ameren’s coal-fired power plant in Labadie is among the top ten greenhouse gas emitters in the country. That’s according to data released today [on Wednesday] by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Véronique LaCapra reports, from St. Louis.