Amy Simons

United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson did not let pool reporters into some meetings during his trip to the Demilitarized Zone in Korea, deciding to only take a Fox News reporter instead. Tillerson reportedly has little interaction with media, and recently made headlines for a comment saying “I’m not a big press access person.”

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discussed why Tillerson is so reluctant to involve the press in his affairs on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”
 

President Trump’s budget proposal calls for the elimination of four independent cultural agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Everyone has been talking about what that means for NPR and PBS, but what about the stations you rely on in rural areas? Also, why Secretary of State Rex Tillerson eschews a press pool, remembering legendary columnist Jimmy Breslin and the end of the Missing Richard Simmons podcast. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Hey Paul Studios

President Trump’s budget proposal calls for the elimination of four independent cultural agencies, including the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Everyone has been talking about what that means for NPR and PBS, but what about the stations you rely on in rural areas?

Sopan Deb, New York Times: “Trump proposes eliminating the arts and humanities endowments

Are you Missing Richard Simmons? The new podcast from filmmaker Dan Taberski is drawing national attention unseen since the launch of Serial more than two years ago. What’s the draw? Also, President Trump’s tax returns, new surveillance video of Michael Brown raises new questions about what happened in Ferguson in 2014, why Missouri’s two largest newspapers are teaming up to challenge Gov. Eric Greitens, and what happens when the local television newscast moves out of town. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Matt Spiel

Are you Missing Richard Simmons? The new podcast from filmmaker Dan Taberski is drawing national attention unseen since the launch of Serial more than two years ago. What’s the draw?

Mike Scott, New Orleans Picayune: “Why you should be listening to ‘Missing Richard Simmons’

The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why? Also, how President Trump came to believe former President Obama tapped his phones, WikiLeaks latest data dump, reporting on medical breakthroughs and newsrooms’ role in the International Day of the Woman. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why?

Angus Crawford, BBC: “Facebook failed to remove sexualised images of children

Should all credentialed press be admitted to a White House briefing? White House Press Secretary excluded reporters from several major national news organizations last week. Why did he do it? And, what’s the industry’s response? Also, the president’s decision to skip the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, new marketing strategies from two of the nation’s largest newspapers, and an Oscars night few will ever forget.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Should all credentialed press be admitted to a White House briefing? White House Press Secretary excluded reporters from several major national news organizations last week. Why did he do it? And, what’s the industry’s response?

Ayesha Rascoe, Reuters, “White House bars some news organizations from briefing

Views of the News: When It's More Than A Game

Feb 27, 2017

Dexter Fowler told an ESPN reporter last week that the travel ban’s effect on his family was “unfortunate.” Fowler’s family was going to visit his wife’s family in Iran, but they postponed due to travel concerns. His comment was met with wave of criticism on social media. Among the comments were “shut up” and “just play ball.” Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Stacey Woelfel discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News.”

Does the use of anonymous sources and leaked material by journalists make them the enemy? We haven’t heard words like that from a president since the days of Richard Nixon. Also, why Simon & Schuster and CPAC are backing away from Breitbart Senior Editor Milo Yiannopoulos, how BuzzFeed plans to break you out of your news bubble and more. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Does the use of anonymous sources and leaked material by journalists make them the enemy? We haven’t heard words like that from a president since the days of Richard Nixon.

Reena Flores, CBS News: “White House chief of staff says take Trump seriously when he calls press ‘the enemy’

Views of the News: Playboy Magazine Brings Back Nude Photos

Feb 17, 2017
via Flickr user Matthew Hurst

Cooper Hefner, Playboy’s chief creative officer, announced on Monday that nude photos are returning to the magazine. This comes a year after Playboy removed nudity from their pages. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry discuss this decision on the weekly media criticism program, “Views of the News."

What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations? Also, Sean Spicer draws in the daytime TV audience, Playboy goes back to its old playbook with a return to nude photos, Bob Costas steps aside, making way for Mike Tirico to host NBC’s primetime Olympic programming. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What does it mean when President Donald Trump only calls on reporters from publications owned by buddy Rupert Murdoch? And, the next day, calls on two more from right-leaning organizations?

Jim Rutenberg, New York Times: “When a pillar of the fourth estate rests on a Trump-Murdoch axis

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?” Also, Bill O’Reilly’s reaction to criticism from the Kremlin, how fake news is creating a chilling effect on satirists, and what to expect from Snapchat after its parent company goes public. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Did journalists really fail to report on more than 75 terror attacks like President Trump claims? Or, is he exaggerating to cover up for an advisor’s comments about the non-existent Bowling Green “massacre?”

Mark Hensch & Jordan Fabian: “White House lists terror attacks it claims media ignored

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries. Also, journalists’ response to Steve Bannon’s call to keep its mouth shut and listen more, how George Orwell’s 1984 became required reading outside the high school literature classes and our memories of Mary Tyler Moore. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Reporters were working overtime this weekend, covering the fallout from President Trump’s executive order limiting travel from seven countries.

Evan Perez, Pamela Brown & Kevin Liptak, CNN: “Inside the confusion of the Trump executive order and travel ban

Alternative facts. A slip of the tongue? Or just one more symbol of the relationship between the reporters and the Trump administration? Also, what’s behind a directive to workers at some federal agencies to cut communication with Congress, reporters and public, why newsroom staffers across the country get marching orders to stay home from the Women’s Marches held across the country, and a look at this year’s Oscar nominations.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy: NBC News

Alternate facts. A slip of the tongue? Or just one more symbol of the relationship between the reporters and the Trump administration?

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal? Also, Facebook’s newest effort to filter fake news, the ice storm that wasn’t, and 65 years of morning television. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, John Fennell and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

News broke on Tuesday that Megyn Kelly would be leaving Fox News for NBC News in a deal reportedly worth upwards of $20 million per year. This week on Views of the News, our panel will discuss if her new role is worth the investment. Also, Don Lemon partied extra hard during CNN’s New Year’s Eve coverage – will it have lasting damage? And what role will fake news play in 2017 after Trump becomes president? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

How do journalists ring in the New Year?  Megyn Kelly announced she was moving from Fox News to NBC.  CNN's Don Lemon rivaled Mariah Carey for most embarrassing moment by getting progressively more drunk on live TV.  A Washington Post reporter chronicled the death threats he received for his aggressive coverage of Donald Trump.  And lots of us talked about how we could cover the president-elect and other big stories with more clarity and purpose in 2017.  Meanwhile, some big brands tackled Islamophobia in new video ads.

Megyn Kelly says goodbye to Fox News

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base. Also, Trump’s on-going role on NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice, reading the tea leaves on media cross-ownership and a look at a generation of children growing up on YouTube. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Hanbyul

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base.

Lauren Duca, Teen Vogue: “Donald Trump is gaslighting America

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask? Also, the impact of fake news on private citizens, a CNN field producer is caught on tape making inappropriate jokes about President-elect Donald Trump. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy: NBC News

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask?

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag. Also, covering the death Fidel Castro and some pretty shallow coverage of the standoff at the Standing Rock Reservation. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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