Amy Simons

Harvey Weinstein remains in rehab undergoing treatment for a sex addiction while his peers expel him from the Motion Picture Academy and the Producers Guild and his company crumbles financially. Meanwhile, NBC execs deny claims they quashed a reporter’s work on the story and football commentator jokes on Sunday Night Football. We’ll break down the developments in the Weinstein saga. Also, President Donald Trump’s threat to go after broadcast licenses, why the New York Times felt a need to update its social media policy and why it’s so hard for some people to ad lib on TV. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? Also, ESPN suspends Jemele Hill after another violation of the network’s social media policy, Dove apologizes for a racially insensitive promotion and Facebook has a plan for fact checking. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? 

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, New York Times: “Harvey Weinstein paid off sexual harassment accusers for decades

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. Also, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg acknowledges the platform’s advertising practices are flawed, Megyn Kelly’s ‘Today’ debut, and interactions between reporters and police during the ongoing protests in St. Louis. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. 

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? Also, the ethics of undercover reporting, why the Department of Justice wants some RT associates to register as foreign agents, and Disney’s attempt to bring back the Mickey Mouse Club – or should we say Club Mickey Mouse. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

CNN's Patrick Oppmann reports on Hurricane Irma from Cuba.
Courtesy CNN

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? 

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? Also, why the EPA called an AP report about Houston superfund sites yellow journalism, an ESPN commentator quits rather than call football games, and Tronc’s move to buy the New York Daily News. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? 

Adam B. Vary, BuzzFeed: “Why Hollywood bombed so badly this summer

Reporters are stepping up to cover Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath in ways we haven’t seen in more than a decade. This week, a look at some of the personal stories, the changes in technology and what’s still to come in the reporting from south Texas. Also, ESPN’s decision to pull a broadcaster from a University of Virgina football game because of his name, the removal of a novel from the New York Times’ Bestseller List, and the end of an era in “pop” music. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy KHOU-TV

Reporters are stepping up to cover Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath in ways we haven’t seen in more than a decade. This week, a look at some of the personal stories, the changes in technology and what’s still to come in the reporting from south Texas. 

Brian Stelter, CNN Money: “Networks, newspapers out in full force as Hurricane Harvey soaks Texas

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? Also, what’s ahead for Steve Bannon and Breitbart News now that he’s back at the alt-right news site following his departure from the White House, brands back off from advertising amid politically and racially-charged news coverage. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? 

  The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests.  A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story.  Is there enough context? Professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel discuss this and more on this week's Views of the News.

The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests. A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story. Is there enough context? Professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel discuss this and more on this week's Views of the News.

The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests.  A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story.  Is there enough context?

Megyn Kelly’s profile of Infowars’ founder Alex Jones has run – in most U.S. cites. Did it live up to the hype? Also, rumors Sean Spicer is searching for his replacement, Fox News drops its iconic “Fair & Balanced” slogan, and coverage of the Cosby mistrial. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

Megyn Kelly’s profile of Infowars’ founder Alex Jones has run – in most U.S. cites. Did it live up to the hype? 

Jack Shafer, POLITICO: “Megyn Kelly pantses Alex Jones

Megyn Kelly is under attack for an interview with Infowars' Alex Jones set to air Sunday evening on NBC. Will the interview expose a conspiracy theorist or just give him a platform to spread this beliefs? Also, an Oregon newspaper’s decision to report on a prominent college athelete’s sexual molestation conviction, Montana Congressman-elect Greg Gianforte pleads guilty to misdemeanor assault for taking down the Guardian’s Ben Jacobs in a headlock, and the media circus around the Comey and Sessions senate hearings. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jeimmie Nevalga: Views of the News.

Courtesy NBC

Megyn Kelly is under attack for an interview with Infowars' Alex Jones set to air Sunday evening on NBC. Will the interview expose a conspiracy theorist or just give him a platform to spread his beliefs?

Margaret Sullivan, Washington Post: “Exposing the evil of Alex Jones is crucial. A Megyn Kelly one-on-one is not the way to do it.

Is she the next Edward Snowden? We’ll talk about the arrest of Reality Leigh Winner on charges of leaking top-secret documents detailing a 2016 Russian cyberattack on election software.   

Matthew Cole, Richard Esposito, Sam Biddle & Ryan Grim, The Intercept: “Top-secret NSA report details Russian hacking effort days before 2016 election

Fox News announced it is retracting its story on Seth Rich. The DNC staffer was murdered in Washington D.C. last summer. The cable network has been reporting for more than a week that his slaying came 12 days after contacting Wikileaks. Now, it says that reporting doesn’t stand up to its editorial standards. What changed? Also, remembering Roger Ailes and the complicated legacy he leaves behind, Anderson Cooper’s snarky streak continues, and the guidance Facebook gives employees for removing hate speech, sexually explicit or violent content from the site. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Courtesy Fox News

Fox News announced it is retracting its story on Seth Rich. The DNC staffer was murdered in Washington D.C. last summer. The cable network has been reporting for more than a week that his slaying came 12 days after contacting Wikileaks. Now, it says that reporting doesn’t stand up to its editorial standards. What changed? 

Fox News: “Statement on coverage of Seth Rich murder investigation

The Washington Post reports that President Donald Trump shared classified intelligence with a Russian envoy during a meeting in the Oval Office last week. The Trump administration denies the report – while the president is tweeted to the contrary. Where’s the truth? Also, the Chicago Tribune’s parent company makes a play for the Sun-Times, a Colorado law exposes journalists voting habits, and a story of modern-day slavery in the United States. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The Washington Post reports that President Donald Trump shared classified intelligence with a Russian envoy during a meeting in the Oval Office last week. The Trump administration denies the report – while the president is tweeted to the contrary. Where’s the truth?

President Trump’s decision to fire now-former FBI Director James Comey came as a surprise to almost everyone Tuesday afternoon. How did reporters react in the moments and hours following the announcement? Sinclair Broadcast Group, the largest television station ownership group in the U.S., is about to get even bigger with the purchase of Tribune Media. And, why Wisconsin’s governor wants to cut a popular outdoors magazine, the FCC’s investigation into complaints about Stephen Colbert and Richard Simmons’ lawsuit against the National Enquirer. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

FBI Photo

President Trump’s decision to fire now-former FBI Director James Comey came as a surprise to almost everyone Tuesday afternoon. How did reporters react in the moments and hours following the announcement?

Michael D. Shear & Matt Apuzzo, New York Times: “F.B.I. Director James Comey is fired by Trump

Fox News Channel is under new leadership. But, will Suzanne Scott bring true cultural change to an organization rife with claims of gender and racial bias? Also, President Trumps first 100 days, New York Times and climate science and Heineken’s new viral ad people are calling the antidote to the Pepsi debacle from last month. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Fox News Channel is under new leadership. But, will Suzanne Scott bring true cultural change to an organization rife with claims of gender and racial bias?

Hadas Gold, POLITICO: “Hannity denies he’s leaving Fox News

Fox News ousts Bill O'Reilly amid sexual harassment allegations. Video posted of a brutal murder in Cleveland forces Facebook to address the question again: is it a media company? What obligation does it have to monitor for criminal or violent content? Also, the White House’s decision not to make visitor logs public, can a commercial for McDonald’s be effective without any mention of McDonald’s and why Boston’s Fox affiliate is dropping network branding. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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