Amy Simons

WCIA-TV

Champaign, IL local TV personality and anchor Dave Benton shared saddening news with the audience. Benton is stricken with brain cancer, and last fall he announced doctors said he only had about six months to live. Benton continued anchoring until just recently when he declared he is unable to continue working due to a weakening eyesight. 

Courtesy NBC

Former Dateline NBC program, "To Catch a Predator" may make a comeback. The show was hosted by Chris Hansen where he and the civilian watchdog group, Perverted-Justice teamed up to lure people looking to have sex with minors. The last episode aired seven years ago, and Hansen is looking to bring the program back, but this time he'll call it, "Hansen vs. Predator."

Missouri School of Journalism professors and "Views of the News" hosts Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss Hansen's quest to harvest support through Kickstarter.

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    


Rand Paul Versus The Media

Apr 20, 2015
Flickr user Gage Skidmore

Republican candidate Rand Paul is prickly. At least when he's being interviewed. Paul got into it with The Today Show's Savannah Guthrie, Fox News' Megyn Kelly and The Guardian's Paul Lewis. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss whose skin is thinner.

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

Flickr user Rona Proudfoot

On Sunday Hillary Clinton sent a tweet and posted a YouTube video announcing her candidacy for president. What is Clinton's campaign doing differently this time around? Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

Courtesy NBC

Remember NBC’s franchise, “To Catch a Predator?” Chris Hansen does, and he hopes you do, too. The former network investigative reporter is launching a Kickstarter campaign to revive the one-time hit. If he’s successful in raising $400,000, his new program “Hansen vs. Predator” will run online while Hansen tries to sell it to a network.

via Flickr user Anthony Quintano

We are all C-SPAN now. Two new apps hit the market in the last few weeks that make it possible to live stream footage straight from your mobile phone, and share it through Twitter. Meerkat and Periscope are both free to download, and journalists are already starting to explore new ways to deliver content instantly. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, Views of the News. 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  


The Future of Rolling Stone Discussed

Apr 11, 2015
Courtesy Rolling Stone

  A moment that will go down in journalism's history, the failure of Rolling Stone's article, "A Rape on Campus." Rolling Stone published its article last November, a story that depicted a brutal gang rape on University of Virginia student, "Jackie." The article resulted in a wave of controversy across the nation as factual errors began to arise. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on Views of the News and what's in store for Rolling Stone moving forward. 

  Who is to blame for the journalism malpractice at Rolling Stone? The reporter? The editors? The fact-checkers? Jackie? Columbia Journalism School’s report into to “A Rape On Campus” is out, and it’s scathing. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean will talk about how it happened, why it happened and what can be done to prevent it from happening again.


Courtesy Rolling Stone

The Columbia Journalism School issued a 12,600-plus word indictment of Rolling Stone's story, "A Rape on Campus."  The months-long investigation revealed a breakdown in the reporting, editing and fact-checking processes -- as reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely put too much emphasis on an account provided to her by a single source, "Jackie." It also pointed to fatal flaws in the verification of her story prior to publication.

 Sports radio talk personalities Dan Bernstein and Matt Speigel criticized Comcast sports sideline reporter Aiyana Cristal's on-air performance, but ended up focusing more on her body and not her work. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

 

Bob McCulloch Spoke on MU's Campus, But to a Select Group

Apr 2, 2015
KARA TABOR / KBIA

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch spoke at the Missouri School of Law on Tuesday about the grand jury process. McCulloch was the lead prosecutor to handle the jury during the Ferguson case that decided not to indict former officer Darren Wilson who shot and killed Michael Brown last August. 

The event was not heavily promoted. Instead, it was only open to students, faculty and staff of the MU Law School who had to register for the event. The student chapter of the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys organized McCulloch's appearance, and said due to full capacity of Hulston Hall the public was not allowed in, including the media. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

 


Justin Eagan / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) signed the state's Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law Thursday, March 26. The law is said to allow businesses to refuse service citing religious reasons. The fear? Those in opposition to the law say this is legislated discrimination, and that it specifically targets the LGBTQ community. ABC'S George Stephanopoulos directly asked Pence if this law is discriminatory, and Pence dodged the question about seven times. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  


    

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts. Also, the media lockout at a law school event featuring St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch, how newsroom diversity affects workplace culture, the Colorado Springs Gazette’s editorial project, Clearing the Haze. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts.

  Robert Durst, the focus of HBO’s ‘The Jinx’ docuseries, is now under arrest and charged with murder in the 2000 homicide of Susan Berman. How role did filmmakers Andrew Jarecki and Marc Smeling play in cracking the case? And, how likely is it the statements they recorded will be admissible in court? Also, a partnership between Starbucks and USA Today attempts to drive a nationwide discussion on race, the Obama administration deletes a rule obligating part of it from the Freedom of Information Act, and whether TIME Magazine gave Hillary Clinton horns on its latest cover. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Starbucks

Coffee giant Starbucks and USA Today have teamed up to start a nationwide conversation about race. Baristas as encouraged to write "#RaceTogether" on drink cups and initiate conversations with customers about racial issues. Friday, there will be a special section in the print editions of the USA Today. That supplement will also be available in Starbucks retail locations.

  Hillary Clinton said she used a personal address while Secretary of State as a manner of convenience, so that she wouldn't need to carry more than one mobile device. It’s an explanation that drew skepticism at Tuesday’s news conference. Also, tech blog Gigaom goes belly up, how you can access HBO without a cable subscription, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Selma march and why a television news reporter decided to thank a public information officer on the air. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Bureau of IIP

Hillary Clinton told reporters Tuesday she chose to use a private email address for her communications while Secretary of State out of convenience.  She maintains she did nothing wrong, but does wish she had done things differently.

Erik Wemple, Washington Post: “With Clinton quip, Kerry expresses his attitude toward open records

How the Media Covered Tom Schweich's Suicide

Mar 6, 2015

Last week Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound. What’s the appropriate way for the news media to cover a suicide? Missouri School of Journalism professors Judd Slivka, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

Just before the incident, Schweich left a voicemail for St. Louis Post-Dispatch Editorial Page Editor, Tony Messenger.  Messenger later released the audio recording.


Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State, used a personal email during her time at the State Department. The New York Times broke the story on March 2. Missouri School of Journalism professors Judd Slivka, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

McKean said he hopes the media doesn't cast this as another political debate, the right versus the left.


  What’s the appropriate way for the news media to cover a suicide? Last week, when Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, it was front-page news. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch released a voicemail Schweich left for Editorial Page Editor Tony Messenger moments before firing the shot. Was publishing a violation of Shweich’s privacy or in the best interest of the public?  Also, Hillary Clinton’s private email address, and update on new allegations against Bill O’Reilly, unmasking ‘Jihadi John’ and how BuzzFeed nearly broke the internet with #TheDress. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Judd Slivka: Views of the News.


State of Missouri

What is the appropriate way for the news media to cover a suicide? Last week, when Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, it was front-page news. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch released a voicemail Schweich left for Editorial Page Editor Tony Messenger moments before firing the shot. Was publishing a violation of Shweich’s privacy or in the best interest of the public? 

The New York Times Changes Things Up

Feb 27, 2015

The New York Times is changing its daily editors' meeting. It's moving from a traditional Page One meeting, in which editors pitch their strongest stories, to what will be called the Dean’s List. This new format will focus more on the Times' digital products, such as for their mobile app and website. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Judd Slivka and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

With more people getting their news from either a tablet or phone, Perry points out that this new method is targeting the mobile audience.


Toronto Star Feels Backlash Over HPV Reporting

Feb 26, 2015

The Toronto Star recently published an investigation into a possible connection between Merck's Gardisil vaccine and illnesses in teenage girls. This vaccine is to help prevent HPV, which can lead to cervical cancer for women. Fifteen days later took down the piece. They took it offline. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Judd Slivka and Amy Simons discussed the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

Once the story was initially released, people began to “hammer” them, Slivka stated.


Bill O'Reilly Is Fighting Back

Feb 26, 2015

Fox News' Bill O'Reilly has recently been criticized for previous reporting he did during his time at CBS on the Falklands War. The Mother Jones article accused O’Reilly of telling tales about what the environment was like when reporting. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Judd Slivka and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

O’Reilly denies the allegations, firing back at his accusers calling them a coward and a guttersnipe.


  Did Bill O’Reilly lie about his experiences reporting during the Falklands War? A story in Mother Jones claims the Fox News Channel host lied about his whereabouts during coverage of the 1982 conflict for CBS News.  We’ll talk about what former colleagues say about that time and what O’Reilly is saying about it.  Also, editors at the New York Times drop the legendary Page One meetings, why the Toronto Star backed off its reporting on the HPV vaccine and the job outlook for journalism graduates. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Judd Slivka: Views of the News.


Remembering David Carr

Feb 21, 2015
Web Summit

Last week was a tough week in our industry. NBC suspended Brian Williams, Jon Stewart stepped down from The Daily Show, Bob Simon from "60 Minutes" died in a car crash, and New York Times media columnist David Carr died of lung cancer. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jaime Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

Carr was not afraid to challenge the establishment. Perry mentioned that he was a man that told people where they could do better and wonders if there will ever be someone like him again. 


FAA Proposes New Drone Rules

Feb 19, 2015
Luke Runyon

The FAA recently proposed new regulations for the use of unmanned aircraft over U.S. airspace -- and it looks like it could be promising for drone journalism. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

This will not only be useful for broadcast and photojournalism, but as Perry said, it will be good for strategic communication, advertising, public relations, science, and agriculture.

  The past week was a shock for many journalists: the sudden deaths of CBS correspondent Bob Simon and New York Times media columnist David Carr, the fallout from Brian Williams suspension and Jon Stewart’s impending departure from “The Daily Show.” What have we lost and what will we most remember? Also, clues from the FAA on how it will regulate the use of drones, why we still televise car chases live, and 40 years of “Saturday Night Live.” From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.


This was a week that was hard on many in the media world, with the sudden deaths of both David Carr and Bob Simon, the suspension of Brian Williams, and word that Jon Stewart would be leaving "The Daily Show."

Former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein told CNN's Brian Stelter that these four stories all tie together, as we come together to strive to tell the best version of the truth.

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