Arts and Culture

True/False Art Installations

Mar 6, 2015

As the True/False Film Festival goes into full gear, the art installations are finally set up. With old standbys and new additions, the True/False Film Festival makes sure the art doesn't end when you leave the theater. Some, like "Unweaving The Fabric Of/Over Time," invite the viewers to participate in the artwork. Others, like "Torus Worm," ask only to be viewed.

Here are just a few of the installations you can see around town this weekend.

Hila Oz

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

“Life according to Ohad” follows its eponymous character as he tries to re-bond with his family. Ohad is an animal rights activist, who throughout the documentary sneaks into slaughterhouses, chains himself to chicken crates and performs unsettling public demonstrations with his teams of activists.

There’s a disconnect between Ohad and his family, though, and while both sides realize the ties of family are deeply important and worth fighting for, so is trying to see life the way others do. I talked with director and vegan activist Eri Daniel Erlich about his choice to make a film about his friend Ohad.

What Happened, Miss Simone?

Mar 6, 2015
Press Photo / What Happened, Miss Simone?

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

The film What Happened, Miss Simone? Takes an intimate look into the life of the late singer and her struggles with fame, race and a tumultuous marriage. The legacy of Nina Simone’s music has spanned multiple generations, shattering racial barriers in the music industry. Trained as a classical pianist, Simone found success in the raw immersive world of jazz and blues. Her songs told the stories of a broken system and racial prejudice that helped set the tone of the civil rights movement in the 1960’s.


True/False Friday

Mar 6, 2015
Bram Sable-Smith / KBIA

As True/False 2015 begins we bring you what's happening, as it happens. We'll rewind the best of the day, including visual arts, music, and of course, films. 

Landon Burke / KBIA

The True/False Film Festival began Thursday night with the Jubilee at the Missouri Theater.  True/False ticketholders were treated to a wide array of complementary wines, cocktails and beers from all over Missouri while local musicians performed.

Note to our readers: This report contains some strong racial language.

This month Selma, Ala., will mark the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday." That's the day police beat demonstrators attempting to march to Montgomery in support of voting rights. Some of the most iconic images of that day were captured by a white photographer — the late Spider Martin.

The Man who is ‘Almost There’

Mar 5, 2015
Press Photo / Almost There

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

83-year-old artist Peter Anton was only known in his community of East Chicago before filmmakers Dan Rybicky and Aaron Wickenden stumbled into his life. The film “Almost There” follows Anton as the filmmakers become his caretakers and advocates for his art exhibit, which quickly becomes controversial.


Press Photo / (T)Error

This week on Off the Clock, we’re featuring a conversation about the film (T)ERROR, a selection for this year’s True/False Film Festival.

The film dives into the world of F.B.I confidential informants and counterterrorism efforts. KBIA’s Austin Federa spoke with Lyric R. Cabral and David Felix Sutcliffe, co-directors of the film (T)ERROR.

Climbing and Filming The Shark's Fin in 'Meru'

Mar 5, 2015
Press Photo / Meru

The Shark’s Fin route of Meru Peak in the Himalayas is considered one of the most challenging climbs in the world. The ascent to the almost 21,000 foot summit has defeated dozens of professional mountain climbers. Meru, one of the films at this weekend’s True False Film Festival, documents three climbers’ trip to the top of the peak where so many others have failed.


Torie Ross / KBIA

Here Say is a project in community storytelling. We travel to a new place each week and ask people to share true stories about things we all experience: love, family, learning, etc. To see where we've been, check out our interactive map


Press Photo / The Visit

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Fest.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

Director Michael Madsen is working on a trilogy of films that he calls “a trilogy on mankind.” The first film, Into Eternity: A Film for the Future, was about the building of a final repository for nuclear waste. He now presents the second in this series, called The Visit, which chronicles the events and conversations that unfold once intelligent, extraterrestrial life has landed on Earth and made contact with mankind.

MU Rec Center

A big weekend is ahead in Columbia. The True/False Film Fest takes over downtown Columbia starting Thursday. Also rolling into action Thursday is the National Intercollegiate Wheelchair Basketball Tournament at MU's Rec Center. Both events are previewed on this week's Thinking Out Loud on KBIA.


Today Paul Pepper chats with JACK SCHULTZ, Bond Life Sciences Center, about epigenetics, or "the higher level of organization" to our genes. Did you know that the amount of DNA in every one of our cells is almost 7ft in length? (...I know, right?!) We pack a lot in 8 minutes - watch! March 4, 2015

Dick Preston / KRCG

My longest job ever was just under four years. It's hard for me to fathom working in the same place for ten years. It is a rarity these days to find someone who has stayed in the same job for more than a decade. This week's guest on Thinking Out Loud has worked for 53 years in the mid-Missouri television market. Forty-seven of those years he has spent with one organization. This week on Thinking Out Loud, we talk with KRCG Anchor and News Producer Dick Preston.


Press Photo / Finders Keepers

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Fest.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

Back in 2008 filmmaker Ed Cunningham heard a strange story on the news about a man who bought a barbecue smoker at an auction and found a severed human leg inside. A legal battle ensued between the finder of the foot and the man it once belonged to.


Press Photo / The Chinese Mayor

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Fest.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

Qi Zhao is an Emmy award winning producer. His most recent film, The Chinese Mayor, depicts the mayor of the Chinese city of Datong as he attempts to transform the city into a cultural destination; a massive undertaking that includes relocating half-a-million of the city’s residents.


Today Paul Pepper and VAL GERMANN, Central Missouri Astronomical Association, talk about tomorrow night's (March 4) unique ability to see the planet Uranus through a pair of binoculars, as well as Thursday night's (March 5) "mini moon." As usual, Val has brought more stunning images from outer space - check them out! March 3, 2015

Today Paul Pepper chats with HEATHER HARLAN, Phoenix Health Programs, Inc., about a free mental health screening for kids and young adults, ages 9-21. Why would you have a child screened? Two words: early intervention. Heather explains - watch! March 2, 2015

Radio Play: "The Mixer"

Feb 28, 2015

This episode of Maplewood Barn Radio Theatre is a bit different from our usual shows: It's narrated from a dog's perspective. 

This story is called "The Mixer," and it was written by one of our favorite authors, P.G. Wodehouse. The tale was first published in a 1915 edition of Strand Magazine in the United Kingdom. The story made its appearance in the United States the next year when it was published in Red Book. 

Radio Play: "The Shadows on the Wall"

Feb 28, 2015

  In this episode of Maplewood Barn Radio Theatre, we bring you a classic chiller by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman: "The Shadows on the Wall."

Mary was raised in a stern household. Her strong religious background played heavily in many of her writings, as she pitted good versus evil with an emphasis on the supernatural, as you'll hear in this presentation. 

The players

  • Caroline: Barb Buchanan
  • Emma: Val Davis
  • Rebecca: Lisa Weaver
  • Henry: Terry Yates
  • Narrator: Darren Hellwege

Production

Radio Play: "The Rival Ghosts"

Feb 28, 2015

Welcome to another edition of Maplewood Barn Radio Theatre. In this episode, we bring you a story by Brander Matthews called, "The Rival Ghosts." 

Although he is hardly remembered today, Brander Matthews was the first full-time professor of dramatic literature in an American university, and he was largely responsible for establishing the theatrical arts as a topic worthy of formal study in academic institutions. 

In 1966, when Leonard Nimoy was offered a minor role on a new space drama, he was thrilled. As he told Archive of American Television: "You have to understand that prior to Star Trek I never had a job that lasted longer than two weeks in any TV show or movie. Never. Two weeks — max. And here I was, looking at a season of work."

The actor beloved for his role as the pointy-eared half-human, half-Vulcan died of lung disease at his home in Los Angeles on Friday. He was 83.

Collection of the Kansas City Art Institute

This week on KBIA's arts/culture segment KCUR's C.J. Janovy explores folk artist, Jesse Howard. 


Today Paul Pepper welcomes LIZA MARTINDALE, LESLIE WAGNER and JOSH FRIEDRICH (a.k.a. Morticia, Wednesday and Gomez, respectively), from Hickman High School's latest production of "The Addams Family: The Musical." Josh performs "Trapped" at [4:52]. February 27, 2015

Noah McQueen is part of "My Brother's Keeper," a White House program aimed at young men of color.

His teen years have been rough, and include several arrests and a short period of incarceration. But last week, he was at the White House. The 18-year-old sat down for a StoryCorps interview with President Obama, who wanted to know more about Noah's life.

Back in 2012, something unusual got started in an alleyway in an already tightly developed part of northeast Washington, D.C.

On an 11th-of-an-acre lot next to a cemetery, behind a block of row houses, tiny houses started to go up. And not just one little house in backyard, like you might see in many places. The builders billed this as an urban tiny house community.

Press Photo / Cartel Land

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Fest.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

Since 2004 the annual True False Film Fest has brought world-class documentary films and their creators to Columbia, and the 2015 festival promises to bring more than fifty films to venues across the city.  Stacey Woelfel, Director of the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism, and an associate professor at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, came in to give us a journalist's preview of True/False 2015.


Today Paul Pepper chats with JUDY ARNET, Central Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, who shares important, easy-to-remember tips ahead of National Nutrition Month (which begins this Sunday). Plus, find out about the latest 'kids in the kitchen' session at the Columbia Public Library. At [4:38] DIANA MOXON tells us about "Everything is a Remix," the latest show at the Columbia Art League! February 26, 2015

Portland Cello Project

Most working cellists play in classical ensembles that perform in concert halls and music theaters. Tonight, Columbia's Rose Music Hall features a different take on the instrument. The Portland Cello Project is an ensemble interested in testing the boundaries of what you expect from the cello.

Today Paul Pepper and VERA MASSEY, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist at University of Missouri Extension, talk about "mindless" and "mindful" eating. Do you know the difference between being physically hungry or emotionally hungry? It's more important than you might think! February 25, 2015

Pages