babies

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Premature birth is a problem throughout the nation including here in Missouri. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of 2014, it affected about 1 in 10 infants.

Rebecca Smith, from the KBIA Health and Wealth Desk, sat down with Trina Ragain, the State Director of Program Services for the Missouri March of Dimes to discuss the problem.


Christopher Hawkins / Flickr

You've probably heard infants babbling strings of syllables before they start using words, but have you ever wondered why?

University of Missouri researcher Mary Fagan examined that question in a recent study by comparing speech development in babies with normal hearing, babies with profound hearing loss and babies with cochlear implants-a surgically implanted device that can help the deaf hear.


To survive, we humans need to be able to do a handful of things: breathe, of course. And drink and eat. Those are obvious.

We're going to focus now on a less obvious — but no less vital — human function: learning. Because new research out today in the journal Science sheds light on the very building blocks of learning.

Columbia College
File Photo / KBIA


Scott Dalrymple began serving as the president of Columbia College last May. KBIA’s Liying Qian caught up with Dalrymple after a presentation he gave last month, to discuss his first few months as president.

If there's one thing Tiger Mothers have in common with those bringing up Bébé, it's that they both show us just how varied parenting styles can be.

Argentine parents let their kids stay up until all hours; Japanese parents let 7-year-olds ride the subway by themselves; and Danish parents leave their kids sleeping in a stroller on the curb while they go inside to shop or eat.

National, state car seat recommendations differ

Jul 29, 2013
treehouse1977 / Flickr

Missouri law requires kids to be in rear-facing car seats at least until the age of one.  But the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children stay rear-facing until age two.   "Because pediatric patients, their neck muscles are not strong enough to withstand forces on an impact when they're forward facing until they're at least two-years-old," Lana Martin, a trauma nurse clinician at CoxHealth in Springfield, said. Under Missouri law, kids less than four-years-old or less than 40 pounds must be in an appropriate child safety seat.

(Flickr/brokinhrt2)

Missouri lawmakers have voted to mandate another health screening for newborn babies.

Legislators gave final approval Wednesday to a measure that will require infants to be screened for critical congenital heart disease within 48 hours of birth or before they are discharged from hospitals. The new mandate would begin for babies born in Missouri in 2014.

Parents could opt out if they sign a written statement saying the screening conflicts with their religious beliefs.