bridgeton landfill

The Environmental Protection Agency says preliminary radiation screening results showed no public health risk at the Bridgeton Municipal Athletic Complex.

Dan Verbeck / KBIA

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster's office has reached agreement with the owners of the Bridgeton Landfill, measures aimed at better controlling underground smoldering and reducing a strong odor that has troubled neighboring residents for months.

Veronique LaCapra / St. Louis Public Radio

A federal judge has ruled that residents who collect damages from a $6.8 million class-action settlement over the smoldering Bridgeton Landfill in St. Louis County can still pursue separate legal claims related to radiation risks.

A tentative agreement reached in April calls for the landfill's owner to pay an average of nearly $13,000 per household to hundreds of affected residents. But some were prepared to turn down the deal, which required approval by 95 percent of the 400 remaining class members.

Joe Gratz / Flickr

A $6.8 million settlement of a class-action lawsuit over a smoldering St. Louis County landfill could be in jeopardy.

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster wants more air monitoring at the Bridgeton Landfill, where an underground fire has been smoldering for more than three years.

Attorney General Koster asked the St. Louis County Circuit Court on Thursday to order the landfill's owner to collect more data on carbon monoxide emissions.

Updated Wednesday, May 22, 5:30 p.m.: The Department of Health & Senior Services is also posting its evaluations of the air monitoring data here. The regulatory standards that DHSS is using to estimate the health risks from landfill fumes are here.

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster announced a preliminary agreement on Tuesday with the owner of the Bridgeton Landfill.

Koster filed a lawsuit against Republic Services six weeks ago, alleging violations of state environmental laws. A fire has been smoldering underground at the landfill for two and half years.

Things have been heating up at the Bridgeton Landfill, a few miles west of the St. Louis airport.

Whether you call it an underground fire, a smoldering event, or just a chemical reaction, it’s causing temperatures inside the landfill to reach well over 200 degrees.