budget cuts

Lincoln University / flickr

  Lincoln University in Jefferson City is struggling to respond to a budget gap created by cuts in state and federal appropriations and a history of being mostly forgotten by government officials.

The university is one of two historically black colleges in Missouri. It says it will lose $3.8 million in state and federal funds for the 2017-2018 academic year. In response, Lincoln is cutting 48 positions and reducing employee pay by 0.5 percent. It's also increasing tuition by 2 percent.

Lincoln University
Kristina D.C. Hoeppner

 

Lincoln University in Jefferson City plans to cut 48 jobs and reduce salaries as it tries to respond to a budget deficit.

The school, which is facing a $3.8 million deficit in its fiscal 2018 budget, announced Monday that 32.5 staff and 15.5 faculty positions will be cut.

KRCG reports a statement from the school said the jobs services it provides to students will continue knowing that the workforce is already stretched too thin.

Paul Sableman / Flickr

St. Louis University is planning to cut about 120 employees in response to a $16 million budget deficit.

An email sent Friday from President Fred Pestello said staff and administrators — but not faculty— will find out Tuesday who will be laid off.

Another 130 vacant positions are being eliminated.

University leaders blame the school's deficit on declining enrollment and increased expenses.

Pestello and other administrators hope to avoid further layoffs by finding between $40 million and $80 million through budget cuts or new income opportunities.

Disability Services Organizations Brace for Cuts

Feb 14, 2017
Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Organizations that provide services to people with disabilities are bracing themselves for funding cuts under Gov. Eric Greiten’s proposed state budget.

A spokesman for Gov. Greitens recently said the budget would save $52 million by raising eligibility requirements for seniors and disabled people in in-home or nursing home care programs.

Cathy Brown is the director of Public Policy and Advocacy at ParaQuad, a non-profit agency that helps people with disabilities live independently through the Medicaid-funded Consumer Directed Services program.

KBIA

Ozarks Technical Community College officials in Springfield, Missouri say they're dramatically increasing tuition should the state face budget cuts.

Chancellor Hal Higdon tells the Springfield News-Leader that the school didn't raise tuition this year because the state's Legislature promised they would quote "get us that money." But if the budget cut for next year is equal to the one this year, Higdon says he will have no choice but to propose a tuition increase.

David Shane / Flickr

Lawmakers are anticipating tuition hikes in Missouri after recently announced budget cuts.

Gov. Eric Greitens announced nearly $68 million in core funding for public universities and community colleges last week. The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that Republican Rep. Lyle Rowland, of Cedarcreek, says he sees little chance of providing more than static spending in the coming year. Rowland is the chairman of the House committee that will take the first look at education spending for the coming year after Greitens submits his budget

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

 Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is blocking millions of dollars of planned Medicaid spending in a budget-balancing move near the end of his term.

The Democratic governor said Wednesday that he was restricting $51 million of budgeted spending, including nearly $43 million for the Medicaid health care program and nearly $9 million in bonding authority. In both cases, Nixon said the budgeted spending wasn't needed because of savings achieved by his administration.

He also cited declining corporate tax revenues as a reason for the cuts.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri schools will get additional money because Gov. Jay Nixon has decided to reverse a few of the budget cuts he made earlier this year.

Nixon on Wednesday released about $12 million of previously blocked spending, including $9 million for public schools. The Democratic governor cited a report released a day earlier showing Missouri revenues grew by 5.8 percent in September compared with the same time last year.

The school funding was part of $59 million of budget cuts Nixon announced last month, after lawmakers overrode his vetoes to enact new tax breaks.

MU Extension Communications Lays Off Some New Employees

Jun 13, 2016
KBIA

MU Extension Communications is drastically reducing the size of its news footprint effective Tuesday. MU Extension Communications laid off two full-time employees and one part-time employee in the Extension news group.

They also let go one employee in its web group. MU Extension Communications Director Dennis Gagnon said there are several groups within communications that perform various functions for Extension. He said this leaves one designated news employee on staff.

Columns and Jesse Hall
Adam Procter / Flickr

The University of Missouri is now projecting a drop in enrollment of 2,630 students for the next school year, which will contribute to a $31.4 million revenue shortfall for MU next year.

University of Missouri leaders briefed faculty and staff Wednesday with the latest figures on enrollment and the budget for the next fiscal year. Vice Chancellor of Finance Rhonda Gibler explained the cuts necessary to right the ship at MU will not be easy.

Columns and Jesse Hall
Adam Procter / Flickr

The University of Missouri says it's planning to close two more dorms on the Columbia campus because of a drop in residency.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says increased state general revenues make some proposed budget cuts unnecessary, specifically those for foster children and people with mental illnesses.

The Internal Revenue Service on Tuesday began accepting tax returns electronically, and paper returns will begin to be processed at the same time. In a statement, the IRS reminded taxpayers that filing electronically is the most accurate way to file a tax return and the fastest way to get a refund.

Philippe Put / Flickr

  Gov. Jay Nixon's administration is cutting back on a $32 million-a-year special program for the blind.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the program offers monthly pension-like payments. The Department of Social Services has told all 3,847 people receiving the pension checks to expect a $33-a-month cut in January. The cut will save the state an estimated $730,000.

hospital room
Fotos GOVBA / flicker

  Compared to their urban counterparts, rural hospitals serve a population that tends to be older, sicker, uninsured and have less income. Rural hospitals provide a lot of uncompensated care and run on more narrow profit margins.

To stay open, these hospitals depend on special federal designations that give them a higher rate of reimbursements from Medicare and Medicaid. For example, when a hospital designated as a critical access hospital, Medicare reimbursements can make up to a third of its entire revenue

Newscast for June 22, 2012

Jun 22, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Gov. Nixon signs and cuts budget
  • Bukowsky drops out of District 47 race
  • Two Southern Boone County school leaders resign following scathing letter

Missouri’s state budget for next year has been signed into law, but Governor Jay Nixon also carved $15 million out of the spending plan that takes effect July 1. 

University of Missouri Press to be eliminated

May 24, 2012
KBIA file photo

The University of Missouri Press will close. That’s according to a press release issued today by the University of Missouri system. The UM system provides the University of Missouri Press with a $400,000 yearly subsidy, and according to the press release, the Press has been unable to operate without a deficit in recent years.

Newscast for April 4, 2012

Apr 4, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Missouri's House and Senate disagree over budget cuts.
  • Missouri members of Congress oppose military base cuts or relocation.
  • A proposal limiting tanning bed usage among teens divides Missouri House members.

Will Murphy / flikr

In some of the first higher education layoffs announced this year in reaction to state funding reductions, Northwest Missouri State University will cut 20 jobs and eliminate or reorganize eight academic departments in a campus-wide move to reduce costs.

File / KBIA

Lawyers have been back in court arguing over the authority of Missouri's governor to make budget cuts.

Nixon softens budget cut to colleges

Feb 7, 2012

Governor Jay Nixon's office announced late Tuesday it may reduce the level of proposed 2013 cuts to higher education by six percent.

Columbia Representative Mary Still says while she's encouraged, she still thinks the cuts are deep.

Matt Veto / KBIA

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Fire destroys Boonville's Unlimited Opportunities businesses
  • Food bank's Buddy Pack program faces cuts, elimination
  • Curators discuss proposed budget cut outcomes

File photo / KBIA

The University of Missouri System Board of Curators is meeting today in Kansas City. One item on the agenda, and on everyone's minds, is the budget.

chip / Flickr

Missouri is planning to refinance more than $500 million of debt as part of Gov. Jay Nixon's plan to balance the state budget.

Newscast for January 24, 2012

Jan 24, 2012
Vicky Hartzler
Wikimedia Common

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Missouri tries to refinance more than a half billion dollars of debt as part of Gov. Jay Nixon's plan to balance the state budget
  • Missouri General Assembly weighs changes to workplace discrimination laws
  • Freshman Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler could face a challenger from her Missouri hometown 

File photo / Flickr

The governor wants to cut the state’s Higher Education budget by nearly 106 million dollars, or 12.5%.

File photo / KBIA

Governor Jay Nixon delivered his annual State of the State Address last night Tuesday night.  He touched briefly on the state budget and other issues, while spending lots of time showcasing his administration’s accomplishments and praising the values of Missouri citizens as he prepares for his re-election bid this fall.  Marshall Griffin recaps the address from Jefferson City: